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1.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(6): 667-678, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899121

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severely ill patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop circulatory failure. We aimed to report patterns of left and right ventricular dysfunction in the first echocardiography following admission to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study that collected echocardiographic and clinical information from severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to 14 ICUs in 8 countries. Patients admitted to ICU who received at least one echocardiography between 1st February 2020 and 30th June 2021 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic data were uploaded using a secured web-based electronic database (REDCap). RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-seven patients were included and the first echo was performed 2 [1, 4] days after ICU admission. The median age was 65 [56, 73] years, and 71% were male. Left ventricle (LV) and/or right ventricle (RV) systolic dysfunction were found in 234 (34.5%) patients. 149 (22%) patients had LV systolic dysfunction (with or without RV dysfunction) without LV dilatation and no elevation in filling pressure. 152 (22.5%) had RV systolic dysfunction. In 517 patients with information on both paradoxical septal motion and quantitative RV size, 90 (17.4%) had acute cor pulmonale (ACP). ACP was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR > 4), pulmonary embolism (OR > 5) and increased PaCO2. Exploratory analyses showed that patients with ACP and older age were more likely to die in hospital (including ICU). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of this cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormal LV and/or RV systolic function in their first echocardiography assessment. While LV systolic dysfunction appears similar to septic cardiomyopathy, RV systolic dysfunction was related to pressure overload due to positive pressure ventilation, hypercapnia and pulmonary embolism. ACP and age seemed to be associated with mortality in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Pulmonary Embolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313137

ABSTRACT

Background:  Understanding heterogeneity seen in patients with COVIDARDS and comparing to non-COVIDARDS may inform tailored treatments.  Methods:  A multidisciplinary team of frontline clinicians and data scientists worked to create the Northwell COVIDARDS dataset (NorthCARDS) leveraging over 11,542 COVID-19 hospital admissions. The data was then summarized to examine descriptive differences based on clinically meaningful categories of lung compliance, and to examine trends in oxygenation. Findings:  Of the 1595 COVIDARDS patients in the NorthCARDS dataset, there were 538 (34·6%) who had very low lung compliance (<20ml/cmH 2 O), 982 (63·2%) with low-normal compliance (20-50ml/cmH 2 O), and 34 (2·2%) with high lung compliance (>50ml/cmH 2 O). The very low compliance group had double the median time to intubation compared to the low-normal group (107 hours (IQR 26·3, 238·3) vs. 37·9 hours (IQR 4·8, 90·7)). Overall, 67·5% (n=1049) of the patients died during the hospitalization. In comparison to non-COVIDARDS reports, there were less patients in the high compliance category (2.2%vs.12%, compliance ≥50mL/cmH20), and more patients with P/F ≤ 150 (57·8% vs. 45.6%). No correlation was apparent between lung compliance and P/F ratio. The Oxygenation Index was similar, (11·12(SD 5·67) vs.12·8(SD 10·8)). 1  

3.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 51, 2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding heterogeneity seen in patients with COVIDARDS and comparing to non-COVIDARDS may inform tailored treatments. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team of frontline clinicians and data scientists worked to create the Northwell COVIDARDS dataset (NorthCARDS) leveraging over 11,542 COVID-19 hospital admissions. The data was then summarized to examine descriptive differences based on clinically meaningful categories of lung compliance, and to examine trends in oxygenation. FINDINGS: Of the 1536 COVIDARDS patients in the NorthCARDS dataset, there were 531 (34.6%) who had very low lung compliance (< 20 ml/cmH2O), 970 (63.2%) with low-normal compliance (20-50 ml/cmH2O), and 35 (2.2%) with high lung compliance (> 50 ml/cmH2O). The very low compliance group had double the median time to intubation compared to the low-normal group (107.3 h (IQR 25.8, 239.2) vs. 39.5 h (IQR 5.4, 91.6)). Overall, 68.8% (n = 1057) of the patients died during hospitalization. In comparison to non-COVIDARDS reports, there were less patients in the high compliance category (2.2% vs. 12%, compliance ≥ 50 mL/cmH20), and more patients with P/F ≤ 150 (59.8% vs. 45.6%). There is a statistically significant correlation between compliance and P/F ratio. The Oxygenation Index is the highest in the very low compliance group (12.51, SD(6.15)), and lowest in high compliance group (8.78, SD(4.93)). CONCLUSIONS: The respiratory system compliance distribution of COVIDARDS is similar to non-COVIDARDS. In some patients, there may be a relation between time to intubation and duration of high levels of supplemental oxygen treatment on trajectory of lung compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hypoxia/virology , Lung/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomechanical Phenomena , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Hypoxia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Function Tests , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
Chest ; 158(6): 2511-2516, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108121

ABSTRACT

Lung ultrasonography (LUS), an imaging modality quickly performed, interpreted, and integrated by the treating physician at the bedside, is a particularly useful tool for acutely ill patients. In the evaluation of a patient with respiratory failure in the ICU or ED, LUS is superior to chest radiograph and generally comparable with CT imaging and reduces the need for patient transport and radiation exposure. This article will provide a concise review of LUS as it pertains to respiratory failure in general and will include examples of relevant ultrasound images and video clips from critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness/therapy , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Testing , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Ultrasonography/methods , Acute Disease , Comparative Effectiveness Research , Humans
7.
Chest ; 159(1): 205-211, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064920

ABSTRACT

Given the general utility of lung ultrasound for the evaluation of respiratory failure in acutely ill patients, it is logical to consider its specific advantages in coronavirus disease 2019-related pulmonary disease. The authors, representing the extensive experience of the North American and European coronavirus disease 2019 epicenters, present an ultrasound scanning protocol and report on the common associated ultrasound findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ultrasonography/methods
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