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Butler-Laporte, Guillaume, Povysil, Gundula, Kosmicki, Jack, Cirulli, Elizabeth, Drivas, Theodore, Furini, Simone, Saad, Chadi, Schmidt, Axel, Olszewski, Pawel, Korotko, Urszula, Quinodoz, Mathieu, Çelik, Elifnaz, Kundu, Kousik, Walter, Klaudia, Jung, Junghyung, Stockwell, Amy, Sloofman, Laura, Charney, Alexander, Jordan, Daniel, Beckmann, Noam, Przychodzen, Bartlomiej, Chang, Timothy, Pottinger, Tess, Shang, Ning, Brand, Fabian, Fava, Francesca, Mari, Francesca, Chwialkowska, Karolina, Niemira, Magdalena, Pula, Szymon, Baillie, Kenneth, Stuckey, Alex, Ganna, Andrea, Karczewski, Konrad, Veerapen, Kumar, Bourgey, Mathieu, Bourque, Guillaume, Eveleigh, Robert J. M.; Forgetta, Vincenzo, Morrison, David, Langlais, David, Lathrop, Mark, Mooser, Vincent, Nakanishi, Tomoko, Frithiof, Robert, Hultström, Michael, Lipcsey, Miklos, Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara, Nordlund, Jessica, Schiabor Barrett, Kelly, Lee, William, Bolze, Alexandre, White, Simon, Riffle, Stephen, Tanudjaja, Francisco, Sandoval, Efren, Neveux, Iva, Dabe, Shaun, Casadei, Nicolas, Motameny, Susanne, Alaamery, Manal, Massadeh, Salam, Aljawini, Nora, Almutairi, Mansour, Arabi, Yaseen, Alqahtan, Saleh, Al Harthi, Fawz, Almutairi, Amal, Alqubaishi, Fatima, Alotaibi, Sarah, Binowayn, Albandari, Alsolm, Ebtehal, Bardisy, Hadeel El, Fawzy, Mohammad, Geschwind, Daniel, Arteaga, Stephanie, Stephens, Alexis, Butte, Manish, Boutros, Paul, Yamaguchi, Takafumi, Tao, Shu, Eng, Stefan, Sanders, Timothy, Tung, Paul, Broudy, Michael, Pan, Yu, Gonzalez, Alfredo, Chavan, Nikhil, Johnson, Ruth, Pasaniuc, Bogdan, Yaspan, Brian, Smieszek, Sandra, Rivolta, Carlo, Bibert, Stephanie, Bochud, Pierre-Yves, Dabrowski, Maciej, Zawadzki, Pawel, Sypniewski, Mateusz, Kaja, Elżbieta, Chariyavilaskul, Pajaree, Nilaratanakul, Voraphoj, Hirankarn, Nattiya, Shotelersuk, Vorasuk, Pongpanich, Monnat, Phokaew, Chureerat, Chetruengchai, Wanna, Kawai, Yosuke, Hasegawa, Takanori, Naito, Tatsuhiko, Namkoong, Ho, Edahiro, Ryuya, Kimura, Akinori, Ogawa, Seishi, Kanai, Takanori, Fukunaga, Koichi, Okada, Yukinori, Imoto, Seiya, Miyano, Satoru, Mangul, Serghei, Abedalthagafi, Malak, Zeberg, Hugo, Grzymski, Joseph, Washington, Nicole, Ossowski, Stephan, Ludwig, Kerstin, Schulte, Eva, Riess, Olaf, Moniuszko, Marcin, Kwasniewski, Miroslaw, Mbarek, Hamdi, Ismail, Said, Verma, Anurag, Goldstein, David, Kiryluk, Krzysztof, Renieri, Alessandra, Ferreira, Manuel, Richards, Brent, Initiative, Covid- Host Genetics, De, C. O. I. Host Genetics Group, Study, Gen-Covid Multicenter, Gen, Omicc Consortium, Japan, Covid-Task Force, Regeneron Genetics, Center.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332108

ABSTRACT

Host genetics is a key determinant of COVID-19 outcomes. Previously, the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative genome-wide association study used common variants to identify multiple loci associated with COVID-19 outcomes. However, variants with the largest impact on COVID-19 outcomes are expected to be rare in the population. Hence, studying rare variants may provide additional insights into disease susceptibility and pathogenesis, thereby informing therapeutics development. Here, we combined whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing from 21 cohorts across 12 countries and performed rare variant exome-wide burden analyses for COVID-19 outcomes. In an analysis of 5,048 severe disease cases and 571,009 controls, we observed that carrying a rare deleterious variant in the SARS-CoV-2 sensor toll-like receptor TLR7 (on chromosome X) was associated with a 5.3-fold increase in severe disease (95% CI: 2.75-10.05, p=5.41×10 -7 ). These results further support TLR7 as a genetic determinant of severe disease and suggest that larger studies on rare variants influencing COVID-19 outcomes could provide additional insights.

2.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 768883, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555159

ABSTRACT

Qatar, a country with a strong health system and a diverse population consisting mainly of expatriate residents, has experienced two large waves of COVID-19 outbreak. In this study, we report on 2634 SARS-CoV-2 whole-genome sequences from infected patients in Qatar between March-2020 and March-2021, representing 1.5% of all positive cases in this period. Despite the restrictions on international travel, the viruses sampled from the populace of Qatar mirrored nearly the entire global population's genomic diversity with nine predominant viral lineages that were sustained by local transmission chains and the emergence of mutations that are likely to have originated in Qatar. We reported an increased number of mutations and deletions in B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 lineages in a short period. These findings raise the imperative need to continue the ongoing genomic surveillance that has been an integral part of the national response to monitor the SARS-CoV-2 profile and re-emergence in Qatar.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Disease Outbreaks , Genomics , Humans , Qatar/epidemiology
3.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(11)2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533885

ABSTRACT

Host genomic information, specifically genomic variations, may characterize susceptibility to disease and identify people with a higher risk of harm, leading to better targeting of care and vaccination. Italy was the epicentre for the spread of COVID-19 in Europe, the first country to go into a national lockdown and has one of the highest COVID-19 associated mortality rates. Qatar, on the other hand has a very low mortality rate. In this study, we compared whole-genome sequencing data of 14398 adults and Qatari-national to 925 Italian individuals. We also included in the comparison whole-exome sequence data from 189 Italian laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases. We focused our study on a curated list of 3619 candidate genes involved in innate immunity and host-pathogen interaction. Two population-gene metric scores, the Delta Singleton-Cohort variant score (DSC) and Sum Singleton-Cohort variant score (SSC), were applied to estimate the presence of selective constraints in the Qatari population and in the Italian cohorts. Results based on DSC and SSC metrics demonstrated a different selective pressure on three genes (MUC5AC, ABCA7, FLNA) between Qatari and Italian populations. This study highlighted the genetic differences between Qatari and Italian populations and identified a subset of genes involved in innate immunity and host-pathogen interaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Adult , Alleles , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Exome/genetics , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology , Genetics, Population , Genomics/methods , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Whole Exome Sequencing/methods , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods
4.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365266

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
5.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247462

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
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