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1.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 203(1): 141-142, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383567

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(12)2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884214

ABSTRACT

In the lung, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are dispersed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) occupying the interstitial space between the capillary endothelium and the alveolar epithelium, in the sub-epithelial tissue and in airway secretions. In addition to playing key structural roles, GAGs contribute to a number of physiologic processes ranging from cell differentiation, cell adhesion and wound healing. Cytokine and chemokine-GAG interactions are also involved in presentation of inflammatory molecules to respective receptors leading to immune cell migration and airway infiltration. More recently, pathophysiological roles of GAGs have been described. This review aims to discuss the biological roles and molecular interactions of GAGs, and their impact in the pathology of chronic airway diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moreover, the role of GAGs in respiratory disease has been heightened by the current COVID-19 pandemic. This review underlines the essential need for continued research aimed at exploring the contribution of GAGs in the development of inflammation, to provide a better understanding of their biological impact, as well as leads in the development of new therapeutic agents.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Glycosaminoglycans/metabolism , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Pandemics
3.
Med (N Y) ; 3(4): 233-248.e6, 2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882364

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop a febrile pro-inflammatory cytokinemia with accelerated progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here we report the results of a phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous (IV) plasma-purified alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) for moderate to severe ARDS secondary to COVID-19 (EudraCT 2020-001391-15). Methods: Patients (n = 36) were randomized to receive weekly placebo, weekly AAT (Prolastin, Grifols, S.A.; 120 mg/kg), or AAT once followed by weekly placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in plasma interleukin (IL)-6 concentration at 1 week. In addition to assessing safety and tolerability, changes in plasma levels of IL-1ß, IL-8, IL-10, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) and clinical outcomes were assessed as secondary endpoints. Findings: Treatment with IV AAT resulted in decreased inflammation and was safe and well tolerated. The study met its primary endpoint, with decreased circulating IL-6 concentrations at 1 week in the treatment group. This was in contrast to the placebo group, where IL-6 was increased. Similarly, plasma sTNFR1 was substantially decreased in the treatment group while remaining unchanged in patients receiving placebo. IV AAT did not definitively reduce levels of IL-1ß, IL-8, and IL-10. No difference in mortality or ventilator-free days was observed between groups, although a trend toward decreased time on ventilator was observed in AAT-treated patients. Conclusions: In patients with COVID-19 and moderate to severe ARDS, treatment with IV AAT was safe, feasible, and biochemically efficacious. The data support progression to a phase 3 trial and prompt further investigation of AAT as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic. Funding: ECSA-2020-009; Elaine Galwey Research Bursary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interleukin-10/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/therapeutic use , Interleukin-8/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency/drug therapy
4.
Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis ; 9(2): 266-273, 2022 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856402

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) are at increased risk for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly if they smoke. This, coupled with their predilection for dysregulated inflammation and autoimmunity, makes affected individuals priority candidates for vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To promote vaccine uptake effectively, an understanding of the factors motivating people to proceed with vaccination is essential. The attitudes of patients with AATD towards COVID-19 vaccination have yet to be described. We prospectively studied 170 Pi*ZZ genotype AATD patients, 150 patients with nonhereditary (Pi*MM genotype) COPD and 140 Pi*MM genotype individuals without lung disease receiving first-dose vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AstraZeneca). Patient attitudes towards vaccination and motivations for getting vaccinated were assessed at the time of the vaccine being offered. Following completion of the 2-dose vaccine series, Pi*ZZ patients were then re-assessed regarding their attitudes towards booster vaccination. The most common primary motivation for accepting vaccination in Pi*ZZ participants ≥50 years old was a fear of illness or death from COVID-19. In contrast, Pi*ZZ patients <50 years most often cited a desire to socialize. The motivation pattern of younger Pi*ZZ AATD patients was similar to that of non-deficient individuals of comparable age, whereas older Pi*ZZ individuals were more closely aligned with Pi*MM COPD and differed from age-matched controls without lung disease. When considering booster vaccination, Pi*ZZ patients were increasingly motivated by a desire to reacquire social freedoms. A desire to reduce the risk of transmission was not a prominent consideration in any of the groups studied. The most commonly cited reason for booster hesitancy was a lack of incentive, given that no additional social freedoms were available to triple-vaccinated individuals compared to those who were double-vaccinated at the time. Taken together, these data may inform policymakers attempting to promote vaccine uptake among patients with AATD.

5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715404

ABSTRACT

Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the canonical serine protease inhibitor of neutrophil-derived proteases and can modulate innate immune mechanisms through its anti-inflammatory activities mediated by a broad spectrum of protein, cytokine, and cell surface interactions. AAT contains a reactive methionine residue that is critical for its protease-specific binding capacity, whereby AAT entraps the protease on cleavage of its reactive centre loop, neutralises its activity by key changes in its tertiary structure, and permits removal of the AAT-protease complex from the circulation. Recently, however, the immunomodulatory role of AAT has come increasingly to the fore with several prominent studies focused on lipid or protein-protein interactions that are predominantly mediated through electrostatic, glycan, or hydrophobic potential binding sites. The aim of this review was to investigate the spectrum of AAT molecular interactions, with newer studies supporting a potential therapeutic paradigm for AAT augmentation therapy in disorders in which a chronic immune response is strongly linked.


Subject(s)
Apolipoproteins/metabolism , Caspases/metabolism , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/metabolism , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/chemistry , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/genetics , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency/genetics , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency/metabolism
6.
EBioMedicine ; 77: 103894, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703667

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is elevated in SARS-CoV-2 infection. IL-6 regulates acute-phase proteins, such as alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a key lung anti-protease. We investigated the protease-anti-protease balance in the circulation and pulmonary compartments in SARS-CoV-2 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared to non-SARS-CoV-2 ARDS (nsARDS) and the effects of tocilizumab (IL-6 receptor antagonist) on anti-protease defence in SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: Levels and activity of AAT and neutrophil elastase (NE) were measured in plasma, airway tissue and tracheal secretions (TA) of people with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS or nsARDS. AAT and IL-6 levels were evaluated in people with moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection who received standard of care +/- tocilizumab. FINDINGS: AAT plasma levels doubled in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. In lung parenchyma AAT levels were increased, as was the percentage of neutrophils involved in NET formation. A protease-anti-protease imbalance was detected in TA with active NE and no active AAT. The airway anti-protease, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor was decreased in SARS-CoV-2-infected lungs and cleaved in TA. In nsARDS, plasma AAT levels were elevated but TA samples had less AAT cleavage, with no detectable active NE in most samples. Induction of AAT in ARDS occurred mainly through IL-6. Tocilizumab down-regulated AAT during SARS-CoV-2 infection. INTERPRETATION: There is a protease-anti-protease imbalance in the airways of SARS-CoV-2-ARDS patients. This imbalance is a target for anti-protease therapy. FUNDING: NIH Serological Sciences Network, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Peptide Hydrolases , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 20, 2021 Jan 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to characterize the effects of prone positioning on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in invasively ventilated patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. RESULTS: This was a prospective cohort study in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral centre. We included 20 consecutive, invasively ventilated patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 related ARDS who underwent prone positioning in ICU as part of their management. The main outcome was the effect of prone positioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics. There was a median improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 132 in the prone position compared to the supine position (IQR 67-228). We observed lower PaO2/FiO2 ratios in those with low (< median) baseline respiratory system static compliance, compared to those with higher (> median) static compliance (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in respiratory system static compliance with prone positioning. Prone positioning was effective in improving oxygenation in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. Furthermore, poor respiratory system static compliance was common and was associated with disease severity. Improvements in oxygenation were partly due to lung recruitment. Prone positioning should be considered in patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Lung/metabolism , Prone Position , COVID-19/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
8.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256226, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374147

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID)-19, as a result of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has been the direct cause of over 2.2 million deaths worldwide. A timely coordinated host-immune response represents the leading driver for restraining SARS-CoV-2 infection. Indeed, several studies have described dysregulated immunity as the crucial determinant for critical illness and the failure of viral control. Improved understanding and management of COVID-19 could greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by SARS-CoV-2. One aspect of the immune response that has to date been understudied is whether lipid mediator production is dysregulated in critically ill patients. In the present study, plasma from COVID-19 patients with either severe disease and those that were critically ill was collected and lipid mediator profiles were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results from these studies indicated that plasma concentrations of both pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediator were reduced in critically ill patients when compared with those with severe disease. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of a select group of mediators that included the specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) Resolvin (Rv) D1 and RvE4 were diagnostic of disease severity. Interestingly, peripheral blood SPM concentrations were also linked with outcome in critically ill patients, where we observed reduced overall concentrations of these mediators in those patients that did not survive. Together the present findings establish a link between plasma lipid mediators and disease severity in patients with COVID-19 and indicate that plasma SPM concentrations may be linked with survival in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Docosahexaenoic Acids/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Critical Illness , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Up-Regulation
9.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(6): 643-654, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291133

ABSTRACT

Circulating concentrations of the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) are known to be increased in pro-inflammatory critical care syndromes, such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in serum IL-6 concentrations in patients with severe COVID-19 have led to renewed interest in the cytokine as a therapeutic target. However, although the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6 are widely known, the cytokine also has a series of important physiological and anti-inflammatory functions. An adequate understanding of the complex processes by which IL-6 signalling occurs is crucial for the correct interpretation of IL-6 concentrations in the blood or lung, the use of IL-6 as a critical care biomarker, or the design of effective anti-IL-6 strategies. Here, we outline the role of IL-6 in health and disease, explain the different types of IL-6 signalling and their contribution to the net biological effect of the cytokine, describe the approaches to IL-6 inhibition that are currently available, and discuss implications for the future use of treatments such as tocilizumab in the critical care setting.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Interleukin-6 , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Anesthesiology ; 134(5): 792-808, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202432

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by hypoxemia, altered alveolar-capillary permeability, and neutrophil-dominated inflammatory pulmonary edema. Despite decades of research, an effective drug therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome remains elusive. The ideal pharmacotherapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome should demonstrate antiprotease activity and target injurious inflammatory pathways while maintaining host defense against infection. Furthermore, a drug with a reputable safety profile, low possibility of off-target effects, and well-known pharmacokinetics would be desirable. The endogenous 52-kd serine protease α1-antitrypsin has the potential to be a novel treatment option for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The main function of α1-antitrypsin is as an antiprotease, targeting neutrophil elastase in particular. However, studies have also highlighted the role of α1-antitrypsin in the modulation of inflammation and bacterial clearance. In light of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the identification of a treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome is even more pertinent, and α1-antitrypsin has been implicated in the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils/drug effects , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/enzymology , Lung/immunology , Neutrophils/enzymology , Neutrophils/immunology , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/enzymology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology
11.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20(1): 31-35, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical course of severe COVID-19 in cystic fibrosis (CF) is incompletely understood. We describe the use of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) as a salvage therapy in a critically unwell patient with CF (PWCF) who developed COVID-19 while awaiting lung transplantation. METHODS: IV AAT was administered at 120 mg/kg/week for 4 consecutive weeks. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) were assessed at regular intervals in plasma, with IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8 and neutrophil elastase (NE) activity measured in airway secretions. Levels were compared to baseline and historic severe exacerbation measurements. RESULTS: Systemic and airway inflammatory markers were increased compared to both prior exacerbation and baseline levels, in particular IL-6, IL-1ß and NE activity. Following each AAT dose, rapid decreases in each inflammatory parameter were observed. These were matched by marked clinical and radiographic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: The results support further investigation of AAT as a COVID-19 therapeutic, and re-exploration of its use in CF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Ireland , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Thorax ; 76(1): 86-88, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066942

ABSTRACT

False negatives from nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) in SARS-CoV-2 are high. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) contains lower respiratory droplets that may improve detection. We performed EBC RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 genes (E, S, N, ORF1ab) on NPS-positive (n=16) and NPS-negative/clinically positive COVID-19 patients (n=15) using two commercial assays. EBC detected SARS-CoV-2 in 93.5% (29/31) using the four genes. Pre-SARS-CoV-2 era controls (n=14) were negative. EBC was positive in NPS negative/clinically positive patients in 66.6% (10/15) using the identical E and S (E/S) gene assay used for NPS, 73.3% (11/15) using the N/ORF1ab assay and 14/15 (93.3%) combined.


Subject(s)
Breath Tests/methods , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Exhalation , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results
14.
EBioMedicine ; 61: 103026, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838033

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prognostic tools are required to guide clinical decision-making in COVID-19. METHODS: We studied the relationship between the ratio of interleukin (IL)-6 to IL-10 and clinical outcome in 80 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, and created a simple 5-point linear score predictor of clinical outcome, the Dublin-Boston score. Clinical outcome was analysed as a three-level ordinal variable ("Improved", "Unchanged", or "Declined"). For both IL-6:IL-10 ratio and IL-6 alone, we associated clinical outcome with a) baseline biomarker levels, b) change in biomarker level from day 0 to day 2, c) change in biomarker from day 0 to day 4, and d) slope of biomarker change throughout the study. The associations between ordinal clinical outcome and each of the different predictors were performed with proportional odds logistic regression. Associations were run both "unadjusted" and adjusted for age and sex. Nested cross-validation was used to identify the model for incorporation into the Dublin-Boston score. FINDINGS: The 4-day change in IL-6:IL-10 ratio was chosen to derive the Dublin-Boston score. Each 1 point increase in the score was associated with a 5.6 times increased odds for a more severe outcome (OR 5.62, 95% CI -3.22-9.81, P = 1.2 × 10-9). Both the Dublin-Boston score and the 4-day change in IL-6:IL-10 significantly outperformed IL-6 alone in predicting clinical outcome at day 7. INTERPRETATION: The Dublin-Boston score is easily calculated and can be applied to a spectrum of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. More informed prognosis could help determine when to escalate care, institute or remove mechanical ventilation, or drive considerations for therapies. FUNDING: Funding was received from the Elaine Galwey Research Fellowship, American Thoracic Society, National Institutes of Health and the Parker B Francis Research Opportunity Award.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
15.
Ir J Med Sci ; 190(2): 461-468, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In January 2020, the WHO declared the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak a public health emergency; by March 11, a pandemic was declared. To date in Ireland, over 3300 patients have been admitted to acute hospitals as a result of infection with COVID-19. AIMS: This article aims to describe the establishment of a COVID Recovery Service, a multidisciplinary service for comprehensive follow-up of patients with a hospital diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: A hybrid model of virtual and in-person clinics was established, supported by a multidisciplinary team consisting of respiratory, critical care, infectious diseases, psychiatry, and psychology services. This model identifies patients who need enhanced follow-up following COVID-19 pneumonia and aims to support patients with complications of COVID-19 and those who require integrated community care. RESULTS: We describe a post-COVID-19 service structure together with detailed protocols for multidisciplinary follow-up. One hundred seventy-four patients were discharged from Beaumont Hospital after COVID-19 pneumonia. Sixty-seven percent were male with a median age (IQR) of 66.5 (51-97). Twenty-two percent were admitted to the ICU for mechanical ventilation, 11% had non-invasive ventilation or high flow oxygen, and 67% did not have specialist respiratory support. Early data suggests that 48% of these patients will require medium to long-term specialist follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate the implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary approach to patients with COVID-19, identifying those with increased physical and mental healthcare needs. Our initial experience suggests that significant physical, psychological, and cognitive impairments may persist despite clinical resolution of the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
16.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(6): 812-821, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614625

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a global threat to health. Its inflammatory characteristics are incompletely understood.Objectives: To define the cytokine profile of COVID-19 and to identify evidence of immunometabolic alterations in those with severe illness.Methods: Levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and sTNFR1 (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1) were assessed in plasma from healthy volunteers, hospitalized but stable patients with COVID-19 (COVIDstable patients), patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission (COVIDICU patients), and patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring ICU support (CAPICU patients). Immunometabolic markers were measured in circulating neutrophils from patients with severe COVID-19. The acute phase response of AAT (alpha-1 antitrypsin) to COVID-19 was also evaluated.Measurements and Main Results: IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and sTNFR1 were all increased in patients with COVID-19. COVIDICU patients could be clearly differentiated from COVIDstable patients, and demonstrated higher levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, and sTNFR1 but lower IL-10 than CAPICU patients. COVID-19 neutrophils displayed altered immunometabolism, with increased cytosolic PKM2 (pyruvate kinase M2), phosphorylated PKM2, HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α), and lactate. The production and sialylation of AAT increased in COVID-19, but this antiinflammatory response was overwhelmed in severe illness, with the IL-6:AAT ratio markedly higher in patients requiring ICU admission (P < 0.0001). In critically unwell patients with COVID-19, increases in IL-6:AAT predicted prolonged ICU stay and mortality, whereas improvement in IL-6:AAT was associated with clinical resolution (P < 0.0001).Conclusions: The COVID-19 cytokinemia is distinct from that of other types of pneumonia, leading to organ failure and ICU need. Neutrophils undergo immunometabolic reprogramming in severe COVID-19 illness. Cytokine ratios may predict outcomes in this population.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Reaction/immunology , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Lactic Acid/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Thyroid Hormones/metabolism , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology , Acute-Phase Reaction/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Blotting, Western , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/immunology , Community-Acquired Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pandemics , Phosphorylation , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/metabolism
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