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1.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 18, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818561

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 myocarditis is becoming increasingly appreciated as a complication of COVID-19. There are significant hurdles to formal diagnosis with endomyocardial biopsy or cardiac MRI, whether by resource limitations, patient instability, or isolation precautions. Therefore, further exploratory analysis is needed to clinically define the characteristics and spectrum of severity of COVID-19 myocarditis. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course, echocardiographic, and laboratory testing across suspected fulminant and non-fulminant clinically defined COVID-19 myocarditis. Methods: In a cross-sectional observational study of 19 patients with clinically defined COVID-19 myocarditis, we report presenting symptoms, clinical course, laboratory findings, and echocardiographic results stratified by non-fulminant and fulminant myocarditis. Student t-test and univariate logistic regression are used to compare laboratory findings across fulminant and non-fulminant cases. Findings: Among 19 patients, there was no prior history of coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure; 21.1% of patients died; and 78.9% of cases required supplemental oxygen. A significantly higher geometric mean D-dimer and ferritin were observed in patients with fulminant compared to non-fulminant suspected myocarditis. 26.3% of cases had pericardial effusions. 10 out of the 16 with available echocardiographic data had normal left ventricular systolic function. Conclusions: In this study, we provide a practical clinical depiction of patients with clinical COVID-19 myocarditis across fulminant and non-fulminant cases. Statistically significant elevations in inflammatory markers in fulminant versus non-fulminant cases generate hypotheses regarding the role of systemic inflammation. While cardiac MRI and endomyocardial biopsy may not be accessible at scale in low- and middle-income countries, the present study offers a clinical definition of COVID-19 myocarditis and accessible laboratory findings to define severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography , Humans , Myocarditis/complications , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , New York City/epidemiology
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24246, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573886

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Predicting early respiratory failure due to COVID-19 can help triage patients to higher levels of care, allocate scarce resources, and reduce morbidity and mortality by appropriately monitoring and treating the patients at greatest risk for deterioration. Given the complexity of COVID-19, machine learning approaches may support clinical decision making for patients with this disease. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to derive a machine learning model that predicts respiratory failure within 48 hours of admission based on data from the emergency department. METHODS: Data were collected from patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to Northwell Health acute care hospitals and were discharged, died, or spent a minimum of 48 hours in the hospital between March 1 and May 11, 2020. Of 11,525 patients, 933 (8.1%) were placed on invasive mechanical ventilation within 48 hours of admission. Variables used by the models included clinical and laboratory data commonly collected in the emergency department. We trained and validated three predictive models (two based on XGBoost and one that used logistic regression) using cross-hospital validation. We compared model performance among all three models as well as an established early warning score (Modified Early Warning Score) using receiver operating characteristic curves, precision-recall curves, and other metrics. RESULTS: The XGBoost model had the highest mean accuracy (0.919; area under the curve=0.77), outperforming the other two models as well as the Modified Early Warning Score. Important predictor variables included the type of oxygen delivery used in the emergency department, patient age, Emergency Severity Index level, respiratory rate, serum lactate, and demographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: The XGBoost model had high predictive accuracy, outperforming other early warning scores. The clinical plausibility and predictive ability of XGBoost suggest that the model could be used to predict 48-hour respiratory failure in admitted patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hospitalization , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Machine Learning , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Clinical Decision Rules , Early Warning Score , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , ROC Curve , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
3.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-296326

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background COVID-19 myocarditis is becoming increasingly appreciated as a complication of COVID-19. There are significant hurdles to formal diagnosis with endomyocardial biopsy or cardiac MRI whether by resource limitations, patient instability, or isolation precautions. Therefore, further exploratory analysis is needed to clinically define the characteristics and spectrum of severity of COVID-19 myocarditis. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course, echocardiographic, and laboratory testing across suspected fulminant and non-fulminant clinically defined COVID-19 myocarditis. Methods In a cross-sectional observational study of 19 patients with clinically defined COVID-19 myocarditis, we report presenting symptoms, clinical course, laboratory findings, and echocardiographic results stratified by non-fulminant and fulminant myocarditis. Student t-test and univariate logistic regression are used to compare laboratory findings across fulminant and non-fulminant cases. Findings Among 19 patients, there was no prior history of coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure;21.1% of patients died;and 78.9% of cases required supplemental oxygen. A significantly higher geometric mean D-dimer and ferritin were observed in patients with fulminant compared to non-fulminant suspected myocarditis. 26.3% of cases had pericardial effusions. 10 out of the 16 with available echocardiographic data had normal left ventricular systolic function. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, we provide a practical clinical depiction of patients with clinical COVID-19 myocarditis across fulminant and non-fulminant cases. Statistically significant elevations in inflammatory markers in fulminant versus non-fulminant cases generate hypothesis regarding the role of systemic inflammation in driving severity of COVID-19 myocarditis.

4.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(10): 1257-1259, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541092

ABSTRACT

We performed a prospective study of 501 patients, regardless of symptoms, admitted to the hospital, to estimate the predictive value of a negative nasopharyngeal swab for severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At a positivity rate of 10.2%, the estimated negative predictive value (NPV) was 97.2% and the NPV rose as prevalence decreased during the study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Hospitalization , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(4): 1032-1035, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525576

ABSTRACT

There is a need to discriminate which COVID-19 inpatients are at higher risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) to inform prophylaxis strategies. The IMPROVE-DD VTE risk assessment model (RAM) has previously demonstrated good discrimination in non-COVID populations. We aimed to externally validate the IMPROVE-DD VTE RAM in medical patients hospitalized with COVID-19. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the IMPROVE-DD VTE RAM in adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to one of thirteen Northwell Health hospitals in the New York metropolitan area between March 1, 2020 and April 27, 2020. VTE was defined as new-onset symptomatic deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. To assess the predictive value of the RAM, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Of 9407 patients who met study criteria, 274 patients developed VTE with a prevalence of 2.91%. The VTE rate was 0.41% for IMPROVE-DD score 0-1 (low risk), 1.21% for score 2-3 (moderate risk), and 5.30% for score ≥ 4 (high risk). Approximately 45.7% of patients were classified as high VTE risk, 33.3% moderate risk, and 21.0% low risk. Discrimination of low versus moderate-high VTE risk demonstrated sensitivity 0.971, specificity 0.215, PPV 0.036, and NPV 0.996. ROC AUC was 0.703. In this external validation study, the IMPROVE-DD VTE RAM demonstrated very good discrimination to identify hospitalized COVID-19 patients at low, moderate, and high VTE risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Risk Assessment , Venous Thromboembolism , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Inpatients , New York City , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology
6.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):33-34, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339052

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThromboembolic outcomes have emerged as an important issue in sick hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms for thrombosis have been implicated, including endothelial dysfunction, increased von Willebrand factor (vWF), interleukin-6 release, and activation of/interaction between macrophages, monocytes, endothelial cells, platelets and lymphocytes. The actual rate of arterial and venous thromboembolic events (ATE and VTE) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, especially in the immediate post-hospital discharge period, has not been fully elucidated, with most of the data derived from retrospective studies with small sample sizes.MethodsAgainst this background, we have designed and implemented an ongoing prospective registry (CORE-19) consisting of 11,249 consecutive hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from March 1st 2020 through May 31st 2020 using data derived from the Northwell Health System and the COVID-19 Research Consortium to study through 90-days post-discharge the rate of VTE and ATE, major bleeding, all-cause mortality, and other complications. We are capturing data of interest including demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, relevant medications, hospital setting, in-hospital treatment, thromboprophylaxis usage, key laboratory parameters, and 90-day thromboembolic and other key outcomes. A unified data repository (datamart) of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across multiple datasets from electronic health records, health informatics exchange, a dedicated radiology database, and a standardized data collection tool in REDCap, that includes telephonic calls up to 90 days post-discharge, is being implemented. A common data model (CDM) is utilized to ensure semantic interoperability between data originating from disparate sources. Northwell Health protocols stipulate the use of post-discharge low-molecular weight heparin, direct oral anticoagulants, or baby aspirin in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with high thrombotic risk features.ResultsOur cohort as of August 7, 2020 consists of complete follow up in 4,100 patients with a mean age of 61.0 years (SD: 17.0) with 54.7% males (Table 1). Preliminary data show an all-cause mortality rate of 4.29%, an overall thromboembolic rate of 3.51% (2.41% VTE and 1.10% ATE), a major bleeding rate of 1.61%, and a rehospitalization rate of 12.85%. Of patients with either DVT or PE post-discharge, 13.43% (9/67) died. The full dataset, including risk factors, comorbidities, key in-hospital and post-discharge medications including anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents, will be available at the time of presentation to the ASH congress.ConclusionOur ongoing registry is a large prospective study evaluating the rate of overall thromboembolic complications and all-cause mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients through 90 days post discharge. Current rates of thromboembolic events signify the importance of post-discharge surveillance and, potentially, post-discharge extended thromboprophylaxis, in this acutely ill medical population.

7.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(6): ofab233, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our objective was to characterize young adult patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and identify predictors of survival at 30 days. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study took place at 12 acute care hospitals in the New York City area. Patients aged 18-39 hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19 between March 1 and April 27, 2020 were included in the study. Demographic, clinical, and outcome data were extracted from electronic health record reports. RESULTS: A total of 1013 patients were included in the study (median age, 33 years; interquartile range [IQR], 28-36; 52% female). At the study end point, 940 (92.8%) patients were discharged alive, 18 (1.8%) remained hospitalized, 5 (0.5%) were transferred to another acute care facility, and 50 (4.9%) died. The most common comorbidities in hospitalized young adult patients were obesity (51.2%), diabetes mellitus (14.8%), and hypertension (13%). Multivariable analysis revealed that obesity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-5.73; P = .002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (aHR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.35; P = .002) were independent predictors of in-hospital 30-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was identified as the strongest negative predictor of 30-day in-hospital survival in young adults with COVID-19.

8.
Blood ; 137(20): 2838-2847, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236540

ABSTRACT

Thromboembolic events, including venous thromboembolism (VTE) and arterial thromboembolism (ATE), and mortality from subclinical thrombotic events occur frequently in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) inpatients. Whether the risk extends postdischarge has been controversial. Our prospective registry included consecutive patients with COVID-19 hospitalized within our multihospital system from 1 March to 31 May 2020. We captured demographics, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, medications, postdischarge thromboprophylaxis, and 90-day outcomes. Data from electronic health records, health informatics exchange, radiology database, and telephonic follow-up were merged. Primary outcome was a composite of adjudicated VTE, ATE, and all-cause mortality (ACM). Principal safety outcome was major bleeding (MB). Among 4906 patients (53.7% male), mean age was 61.7 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (38.6%), diabetes (25.1%), obesity (18.9%), and cancer history (13.1%). Postdischarge thromboprophylaxis was prescribed in 13.2%. VTE rate was 1.55%; ATE, 1.71%; ΑCM, 4.83%; and MB, 1.73%. Composite primary outcome rate was 7.13% and significantly associated with advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 3.66; 95% CI, 2.84-4.71), prior VTE (OR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.00-4.47), intensive care unit (ICU) stay (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.78-2.93), chronic kidney disease (CKD; OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.47-3.0), peripheral arterial disease (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.10-3.80), carotid occlusive disease (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.30-3.14), IMPROVE-DD VTE score ≥4 (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.06-2.14), and coronary artery disease (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04-2.17). Postdischarge anticoagulation was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47-0.81). Postdischarge VTE, ATE, and ACM occurred frequently after COVID-19 hospitalization. Advanced age, cardiovascular risk factors, CKD, IMPROVE-DD VTE score ≥4, and ICU stay increased risk. Postdischarge anticoagulation reduced risk by 46%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/prevention & control
9.
Blood ; 137(20): 2838-2847, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172063

ABSTRACT

Thromboembolic events, including venous thromboembolism (VTE) and arterial thromboembolism (ATE), and mortality from subclinical thrombotic events occur frequently in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) inpatients. Whether the risk extends postdischarge has been controversial. Our prospective registry included consecutive patients with COVID-19 hospitalized within our multihospital system from 1 March to 31 May 2020. We captured demographics, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, medications, postdischarge thromboprophylaxis, and 90-day outcomes. Data from electronic health records, health informatics exchange, radiology database, and telephonic follow-up were merged. Primary outcome was a composite of adjudicated VTE, ATE, and all-cause mortality (ACM). Principal safety outcome was major bleeding (MB). Among 4906 patients (53.7% male), mean age was 61.7 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (38.6%), diabetes (25.1%), obesity (18.9%), and cancer history (13.1%). Postdischarge thromboprophylaxis was prescribed in 13.2%. VTE rate was 1.55%; ATE, 1.71%; ΑCM, 4.83%; and MB, 1.73%. Composite primary outcome rate was 7.13% and significantly associated with advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 3.66; 95% CI, 2.84-4.71), prior VTE (OR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.00-4.47), intensive care unit (ICU) stay (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.78-2.93), chronic kidney disease (CKD; OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.47-3.0), peripheral arterial disease (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.10-3.80), carotid occlusive disease (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.30-3.14), IMPROVE-DD VTE score ≥4 (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.06-2.14), and coronary artery disease (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04-2.17). Postdischarge anticoagulation was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47-0.81). Postdischarge VTE, ATE, and ACM occurred frequently after COVID-19 hospitalization. Advanced age, cardiovascular risk factors, CKD, IMPROVE-DD VTE score ≥4, and ICU stay increased risk. Postdischarge anticoagulation reduced risk by 46%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/prevention & control
10.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 51(4): 897-901, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118256

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) has emerged as an important issue in patients with COVID-19. The purpose of this study is to identify the incidence of VTE and mortality in COVID-19 patients initially presenting to a large health system. Our retrospective study included adult patients (excluding patients presenting with obstetric/gynecologic conditions) across a multihospital health system in the New York Metropolitan Region from March 1-April 27, 2020. VTE and mortality rates within 8 h of assessment were described. In 10,871 adults with COVID-19, 118 patients (1.09%) were diagnosed with symptomatic VTE (101 pulmonary embolism, 17 deep vein thrombosis events) and 28 patients (0.26%) died during initial assessment. Among these 146 patients, 64.4% were males, 56.8% were 60 years or older, 15.1% had a BMI > 35, and 11.6% were admitted to the intensive care unit. Comorbidities included hypertension (46.6%), diabetes (24.7%), hyperlipidemia (14.4%), chronic lung disease (12.3%), coronary artery disease (11.0%), and prior VTE (7.5%). Key medications included corticosteroids (22.6%), statins (21.2%), antiplatelets (20.6%), and anticoagulants (20.6%). Highest D-Dimer was greater than six times the upper limit of normal in 51.4%. Statin and antiplatelet use were associated with decreased VTE or mortality (each p < 0.01). In COVID-19 patients who initially presented to a large multihospital health system, the overall symptomatic VTE and mortality rate was over 1.0%. Statin and antiplatelet use were associated with decreased VTE or mortality. The potential benefits of antithrombotics in high risk COVID-19 patients during the pre-hospitalization period deserves study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Incidence , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , New York/epidemiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Protective Factors , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/mortality
11.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 5(2): 296-300, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antithrombotic guidance statements for hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) suggest a universal thromboprophylactic strategy with potential to escalate doses in high-risk patients. To date, no clear approach exists to discriminate patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to externally validate the IMPROVE-DD risk assessment model (RAM) for VTE in a large cohort of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 within a multihospital health system. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study evaluated the IMPROVE-DD RAM on adult inpatients with COVID-19 hospitalized between March 1, 2020, and April 27, 2020. Diagnosis of VTE was defined by new acute deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism by Radiology Department imaging or point-of-care ultrasound. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted and area under the curve (AUC) calculated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated using standard methods. RESULTS: A total of 9407 patients were included, with a VTE prevalence of 2.9%. The VTE rate was 0.4% for IMPROVE-DD score 0-1 (low risk), 1.3% for score 2-3 (moderate risk), and 5.3% for score ≥ 4 (high risk). Approximately 45% of the total population scored high VTE risk, while 21% scored low VTE risk. IMPROVE-DD discrimination of low versus medium/high risk showed sensitivity of 0.971, specificity of 0.218, PPV of 0.036, and NPV of 0.996. ROC AUC was 0.702. CONCLUSIONS: The IMPROVE-DD VTE RAM demonstrated very good discrimination to identify hospitalized patients with COVID-19 as low, moderate, and high VTE risk in this large external validation study with potential to individualize thromboprophylactic strategies.

12.
Thromb Haemost ; 121(8): 1043-1053, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to identify the prevalence and predictors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or mortality in hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized adult patients admitted to an integrated health care network in the New York metropolitan region between March 1, 2020 and April 27, 2020. The final analysis included 9,407 patients with an overall VTE rate of 2.9% (2.4% in the medical ward and 4.9% in the intensive care unit [ICU]) and a VTE or mortality rate of 26.1%. Most patients received prophylactic-dose thromboprophylaxis. Multivariable analysis showed significantly reduced VTE or mortality with Black race, history of hypertension, angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin receptor blocker use, and initial prophylactic anticoagulation. It also showed significantly increased VTE or mortality with age 60 years or greater, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) of 3 or greater, patients on Medicare, history of heart failure, history of cerebrovascular disease, body mass index greater than 35, steroid use, antirheumatologic medication use, hydroxychloroquine use, maximum D-dimer four times or greater than the upper limit of normal (ULN), ICU level of care, increasing creatinine, and decreasing platelet counts. CONCLUSION: In our large cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the overall in-hospital VTE rate was 2.9% (4.9% in the ICU) and a VTE or mortality rate of 26.1%. Key predictors of VTE or mortality included advanced age, increasing CCI, history of cardiovascular disease, ICU level of care, and elevated maximum D-dimer with a cutoff at least four times the ULN. Use of prophylactic-dose anticoagulation but not treatment-dose anticoagulation was associated with reduced VTE or mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality , Young Adult
13.
Home Health Care Management & Practice ; : 1084822320964196, 2020.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-862143

ABSTRACT

During the height of the novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in New York City, area hospitals were filled to 150% capacity, and there was a significant fear among the public of going to the hospital. Many hospitalized patients were treated with therapies that could be administered in a home setting under proper monitoring. We designed the CROWN Program, a Home-Care based ambulatory protocol to evaluate, monitor, and treat moderate to high risk COVID-19 patients in their homes, with escalation to hospital care when necessary. Patients were evaluated with telehealth visits with a Pulmonologist, and a Home-Care protocol, including RN visit, pulse-oximetry, and oxygen, lab-work, intravenous fluids, medication if needed patient data, comorbidities, and symptoms were collected. Labs, including COVID-19 PCR, D Dimer, CRP, Ferritin, Procalcitonin, CBC, and metabolic panel were measured, as were homecare, home oxygen, and intravenous fluids orders, radiographic studies and initiation of an anticoagulant. Emergency Department visits and need for hospital admission during the study period were recorded. A total of 182 patients were enrolled between the start date of April 27th and June 1st, and fell into two categories: not-admitted (101) and post-discharge (81). Two patients were referred for hospital admission, seven were treated and released from the ED, and one was referred to home hospice. There were no unexpected admissions or deaths. The CROWN program has demonstrated the feasibility and apparent safety of a specialized, Home-Care based protocol for the ambulatory management of moderate to high risk COVID-19 patients.

14.
medRxiv ; 2020 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chinese studies reported predictors of severe disease and mortality associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A generalizable and simple survival calculator based on data from US patients hospitalized with COVID-19 has not yet been introduced. OBJECTIVE: Develop and validate a clinical tool to predict 7-day survival in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective and prospective cohort study. SETTING: Thirteen acute care hospitals in the New York City area. PARTICIPANTS: Adult patients hospitalized with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. The development and internal validation cohort included patients hospitalized between March 1 and May 6, 2020. The external validation cohort included patients hospitalized between March 1 and May 5, 2020. MEASUREMENTS: Demographic, laboratory, clinical, and outcome data were extracted from the electronic health record. Optimal predictors and performance were identified using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression with receiver operating characteristic curves and measurements of area under the curve (AUC). RESULTS: The development and internal validation cohort included 11 095 patients with a median age of 65 years [interquartile range (IQR) 54-77]. Overall 7-day survival was 89%. Serum blood urea nitrogen, age, absolute neutrophil count, red cell distribution width, oxygen saturation, and serum sodium were identified as the 6 optimal of 42 possible predictors of survival. These factors constitute the NOCOS (Northwell COVID-19 Survival) Calculator. Performance in the internal validation, prospective validation, and external validation were marked by AUCs of 0.86, 0.82, and 0.82, respectively. LIMITATIONS: All participants were hospitalized within the New York City area. CONCLUSIONS: The NOCOS Calculator uses 6 factors routinely available at hospital admission to predict 7-day survival for patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The calculator is publicly available at https://feinstein.northwell.edu/NOCOS.

16.
JAMA ; 323(20): 2052-2059, 2020 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-101977

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is limited information describing the presenting characteristics and outcomes of US patients requiring hospitalization for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in a US health care system. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case series of patients with COVID-19 admitted to 12 hospitals in New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County, New York, within the Northwell Health system. The study included all sequentially hospitalized patients between March 1, 2020, and April 4, 2020, inclusive of these dates. Exposures: Confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection by positive result on polymerase chain reaction testing of a nasopharyngeal sample among patients requiring admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical outcomes during hospitalization, such as invasive mechanical ventilation, kidney replacement therapy, and death. Demographics, baseline comorbidities, presenting vital signs, and test results were also collected. Results: A total of 5700 patients were included (median age, 63 years [interquartile range {IQR}, 52-75; range, 0-107 years]; 39.7% female). The most common comorbidities were hypertension (3026; 56.6%), obesity (1737; 41.7%), and diabetes (1808; 33.8%). At triage, 30.7% of patients were febrile, 17.3% had a respiratory rate greater than 24 breaths/min, and 27.8% received supplemental oxygen. The rate of respiratory virus co-infection was 2.1%. Outcomes were assessed for 2634 patients who were discharged or had died at the study end point. During hospitalization, 373 patients (14.2%) (median age, 68 years [IQR, 56-78]; 33.5% female) were treated in the intensive care unit care, 320 (12.2%) received invasive mechanical ventilation, 81 (3.2%) were treated with kidney replacement therapy, and 553 (21%) died. As of April 4, 2020, for patients requiring mechanical ventilation (n = 1151, 20.2%), 38 (3.3%) were discharged alive, 282 (24.5%) died, and 831 (72.2%) remained in hospital. The median postdischarge follow-up time was 4.4 days (IQR, 2.2-9.3). A total of 45 patients (2.2%) were readmitted during the study period. The median time to readmission was 3 days (IQR, 1.0-4.5) for readmitted patients. Among the 3066 patients who remained hospitalized at the final study follow-up date (median age, 65 years [IQR, 54-75]), the median follow-up at time of censoring was 4.5 days (IQR, 2.4-8.1). Conclusions and Relevance: This case series provides characteristics and early outcomes of sequentially hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 in the New York City area.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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