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1.
Clin Imaging ; 83: 152-158, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in dramatic loss of life worldwide, but as the large number of acutely ill patients subsides, the emerging group of "COVID-19 long-haulers" present a clinical challenge. Studies have shown that many of these patients suffer long-term pulmonary disease related to residual fibrosis. Prior studies have shown that while many patients have non-specific findings of fibrotic-like changes, others develop specific patterns of interstitial lung disease. CASE REPORT: Here, we present the first case of a patient developing pulmonary sarcoidosis one year after critical illness from COVID-19. He developed numerous non-necrotizing and well-formed granulomas in mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules, compatible radiographically and pathologically with sarcoid. CONCLUSIONS: While the pathophysiology of sarcoid is incompletely understood, inflammation is mediated through the dysregulation of a number of different cytokines (IFNγ, IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, IL-22). This case provides valuable clues for better understanding of the shared pathophysiology of cytokine dysregulation seen in COVID-19 and other interstitial lung diseases such as sarcoidosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary , Sarcoidosis , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcoidosis/pathology , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/chemically induced , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/diagnostic imaging , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/pathology
2.
JCI Insight ; 7(2)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571524

ABSTRACT

Acute cardiac injury is prevalent in critical COVID-19 and associated with increased mortality. Its etiology remains debated, as initially presumed causes - myocarditis and cardiac necrosis - have proved uncommon. To elucidate the pathophysiology of COVID-19-associated cardiac injury, we conducted a prospective study of the first 69 consecutive COVID-19 decedents at CUIMC in New York City. Of 6 acute cardiac histopathologic features, presence of microthrombi was the most commonly detected among our cohort. We tested associations of cardiac microthrombi with biomarkers of inflammation, cardiac injury, and fibrinolysis and with in-hospital antiplatelet therapy, therapeutic anticoagulation, and corticosteroid treatment, while adjusting for multiple clinical factors, including COVID-19 therapies. Higher peak erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were independently associated with increased odds of microthrombi, supporting an immunothrombotic etiology. Using single-nuclei RNA-sequencing analysis on 3 patients with and 4 patients without cardiac microthrombi, we discovered an enrichment of prothrombotic/antifibrinolytic, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune-potentiating signaling among cardiac fibroblasts in microthrombi-positive, relative to microthrombi-negative, COVID-19 hearts. Non-COVID-19, nonfailing hearts were used as reference controls. Our study identifies a specific transcriptomic signature in cardiac fibroblasts as a salient feature of microthrombi-positive COVID-19 hearts. Our findings warrant further mechanistic study as cardiac fibroblasts may represent a potential therapeutic target for COVID-19-associated cardiac microthrombi.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Injuries , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thrombosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Heart Injuries/genetics , Heart Injuries/metabolism , Heart Injuries/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Myocardium/pathology , Prospective Studies , Thrombosis/genetics , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology
3.
Thorax ; 76(12): 1242-1245, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518155

ABSTRACT

The risk factors for development of fibrotic-like radiographic abnormalities after severe COVID-19 are incompletely described and the extent to which CT findings correlate with symptoms and physical function after hospitalisation remains unclear. At 4 months after hospitalisation, fibrotic-like patterns were more common in those who underwent mechanical ventilation (72%) than in those who did not (20%). We demonstrate that severity of initial illness, duration of mechanical ventilation, lactate dehydrogenase on admission and leucocyte telomere length are independent risk factors for fibrotic-like radiographic abnormalities. These fibrotic-like changes correlate with lung function, cough and measures of frailty, but not with dyspnoea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Telomere , COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea , Fibrosis , Humans , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Telomere/genetics
4.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517636

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
5.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147038

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
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