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1.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4):i, 2021.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2184657
2.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2179883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the 2022 monkeypox (mpox) outbreak, 79,000 global cases have been reported. Yet, limited dermatologic data have been published regarding lesion morphology and progression. OBJECTIVE: To characterize skin lesion morphology, symptomatology, and outcomes of mpox infection over time. METHODS: The AAD/ILDS Dermatology COVID-19, Monkeypox, and Emerging Infections Registry captured de-identified patient cases of mpox entered by healthcare professionals. RESULTS: From August 4-November 13 2022, 101 cases from 13 countries were entered, primarily by dermatologists (92%). Thirty-nine percent had fewer than five lesions. In 54% of cases skin lesions were the first sign of infection. In the first 1-5 days of infection, papules (36%), vesicles (17%) and pustules (20%) predominated. By days 6-10, pustules (36%) were most common, followed by erosions/ulcers (27%) and crusts/scabs (24%). Crusts/scabs were the predominant morphology after Day 11. Ten cases of morbilliform rash were reported. Scarring occurred in 13% of cases. LIMITATIONS: Registry-reported data cannot address incidence. There is potential reporting bias from the predilection to report cases with greater clinical severity. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight differences in skin findings compared to historical outbreaks, notably the presence of skin lesions prior to systemic symptoms and low overall lesion-counts. Scarring emerged as a major possible sequela.

3.
Event Management ; 26(7):1537-1547, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2055458

ABSTRACT

The authors propose a strategy to help event planners pivot and adjust to the post-COVID world. This involves the use of social media and sales force automation (SFA). The authors explain how both of these can be accomplished in a low cost, easy to learn and use manner by adopting LinkedIn. The authors also present three tools that will help the event planner assess if they and their personnel are ready to make such a change. The authors conclude with a set of managerial imperatives that include not only how to be proactive and competitive but also the operational adjustments that will be necessary for the mode of operation, the reach of the planner, how online presence and content will drive awareness, the role and definition of personnel, how client relationships are conducted, and how the different facets of the event itself will change.

5.
Saudi Dent J ; 34(7): 596-603, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983982

ABSTRACT

Objective: Studies have shown that gingival crevices may be a significant route for SARS-CoV-2 entry. However, the role of oral health in the acquisition and severity of COVID-19 is not known. Design: A retrospective analysis was performed using electronic health record data from a large urban academic medical center between 12/1/2019 and 8/24/2020. A total of 387 COVID-19 positive cases were identified and matched 1:1 by age, sex, and race to 387 controls without COVID-19 diagnoses. Demographics, number of missing teeth and alveolar crestal height were determined from radiographs and medical/dental charts. In a subgroup of 107 cases and controls, we also examined the rate of change in alveolar crestal height. A conditional logistic regression model was utilized to assess association between alveolar crestal height and missing teeth with COVID-19 status and with hospitalization status among COVID-19 cases. Results: Increased alveolar bone loss, OR = 4.302 (2.510 - 7.376), fewer missing teeth, OR = 0.897 (0.835-0.965) and lack of smoking history distinguished COVID-19 cases from controls. After adjusting for time between examinations, cases with COVID-19 had greater alveolar bone loss compared to controls (0.641 ± 0.613 mm vs 0.260 ± 0.631 mm, p < 0.01.) Among cases with COVID-19, increased number of missing teeth OR = 2.1871 (1.146- 4.174) was significantly associated with hospitalization. Conclusions: Alveolar bone loss and missing teeth are positively associated with the acquisition and severity of COVID-19 disease, respectively.

6.
Journal of Investigative Dermatology ; 142(8, Supplement):S29, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1936802
7.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S539, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746355

ABSTRACT

Background. We sought to characterize the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV-related outcomes in a cohort of patients by examining rates of viral load (VL) suppression, retention-in-care, PrEP access, and STIs. Methods. This was a single center, retrospective study of adults receiving HIV treatment or HIV/STI prevention services from 01/2019 - 12/2020. HIV outpatient visits were identified through HRSA's CareWARE. Visits (in-person, telehealth) only included HIV primary care. HRSA core performance measures were utilized (Table 1). STI positivity rates and descriptive characteristics were calculated. New and refill PrEP prescriptions were tabulated. Chi-square tests compared unmatched non-parametric variables;McNemar's test matched non-parametric variables. Multivariable logistic regression identified variables associated with retention in care and viral suppression. Results. 1721 patients received care;1234 were seen in both years, 334 only in 2019, 153 only in 2020. The number of telehealth visits increased significantly: video (0% to 31%, < 0.001), phone (0% to 0.4%, p < 0.001). Though the proportion of kept appointments increased (57.2% vs 61.2%), the annual retention in care rate decreased from 74.5% to 70.9% (p = 0.002). Overall, 9.7% of patients had detectable VLs at any point. Compared to 2019, a lower proportion of patients maintained VL suppression in 2020, (91.6% vs 83.5% p = 0.075). More patients did not have a VL drawn in 2020 than in 2019 (10.3% vs 2.0 %, p < 0.001). Patients with detectable VLs in 2019 were more likely than those who were undetectable to have detectable VLs in 2020 (OR 18.2, 95% CI 9.91-33.42). Black race was associated with higher likelihood of lack of VL suppression (OR = 2.0;95% CI 1.10-3.66). There were no significant differences between gender or age groups in rates of viral suppression, number screened for bacterial STIs or positive results. Visits for new and refill PrEP prescriptions decreased by 59% and 7%, respectively. Conclusion. Rates of viral load suppression and retention in care decreased in 2020 compared to 2019. The proportion of clinic visits attended increased after the integration of telemedicine in 2020. These data may be used to inform evidence-based interventions to improve the HIV continuum of care through telehealth.

9.
Diabetes Metab ; 47(6): 101267, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330743

ABSTRACT

AIM: - Patients with diabetes have increased morbidity and mortality from COVID-19. Case reports describe patients with simultaneous COVID-19 and diabetic acidosis (DKA), however there is limited data on the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of DKA in these patients. METHODS: - Patients with COVID-19 were identified from the electronic medical record. DKA was defined by standardized criteria. Proportional hazard regression models were used to determine risk factors for, and mortality from DKA in COVID-19. RESULTS: - Of 2366 patients admitted for COVID-19, 157 (6.6%) patients developed DKA, 94% of whom had antecedent type 2 diabetes, 0.6% had antecedent type 1 diabetes, and 5.7% patients had no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Patients with DKA had increased hospital length of stay and in-patient mortality. Higher HbA1c predicted increased risk of incident DKA (HR 1.47 per 1% increase, 95% CI 1.40-1.54). Risk factors for mortality included older age (HR 1.07 per 5 years, 95% CI 1.06-1.08) and need for pressors (HR 2.33, 95% CI 1.82-2.98). Glucocorticoid use was protective in patients with and without DKA. CONCLUSION: - The combination of DKA and COVID-19 is associated with greater mortality, driven by older age and COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetic Ketoacidosis , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Humans
12.
13.
British Journal of Dermatology ; 183(SUPPL 1):200, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1093710

ABSTRACT

Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with frequent multimorbidity, and immunosuppressants are the mainstay of treatment in moderate-to-severe disease. An understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on individuals with psoriasis and the effect of psoriasis therapies on the course of COVID-19 is urgently required to inform clinical decision-making. This study sought to characterize the clinical course of COVID-19 in patients with psoriasis and to identify factors associated with hospitalization. Clinicianreported cases of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 in psoriasis were collected via an international online registry. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression identified factors associated with hospitalization. Patient risk-mitigating behaviours were characterized using an independent global selfreport registry. In total, 334 clinician-reported cases (median age 50 years, 62% male, median body mass index 28 kg m-2, 85% white) from 22 countries [most frequently, the U.K. (35%), Italy (22%) and Spain (16%)] were available between 27 March and 20 June 2020. Altogether, 245 (73.3%) patients were receiving a biologic, 54 (16.2%) a nonbiologic and 31 (9.3%) no systemic treatment. Overall, 311 (93.1%) achieved a full recovery, 71 (21.2%) were hospitalized and nine (2.7%) died. Risk factors associated with hospitalization were older age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-2.32], male sex (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.11-5.04) and nonwhite ethnicity (aOR 3.40, 95% CI 1.27-9.11), in addition to chronic lung disease (aOR 4.37, 95% CI 1.62-11.74) and hypertension (aOR 2.23, 95% CI 1.05-4.74). Reduced risk of hospitalization was associated with use of a biologic (aOR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-0.98) vs. nonbiological systemic therapy. There was no difference in risk of hospitalization between classes of biologics. An independent selfreport psoriasis registry (1167 patients from 39 countries) suggested increased social isolation (76% vs. 66%;P < 0.05) but similar nonadherence to medication (18% vs 22%) in patients receiving biologics vs. nonbiological systemic treatments. In this international moderate-to-severe psoriasis case series, most patients fully recovered from COVID-19;older age, being male and being of nonwhite ethnicity increased risk of hospitalization. Use of biologics, when compared with nonbiological systemic therapies, was associated with reduced risk of hospitalization;however, this requires further study owing to potential selection bias and unmeasured confounding such as a difference in risk-mitigating behaviours.

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