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1.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925289

ABSTRACT

Objective: To further characterize the relationship between markers of inflammation and outcome in patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Background: Inflammation and infection after ischemic stroke are known to exacerbate tissue injury and worsen clinical outcome. Thrombectomy has become standard of care in stroke, but little data exist regarding how inflammation affects outcome after thrombectomy. Design/Methods: We performed retrospective chart review of stroke patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at 2 tertiary academic centers between December 2018 and November 2020. The relationship between discharge mortality, admission WBC count, admission neutrophil percentage, peak WBC count, and fever (peak temperature >38°C) were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, Student's t-test, and Fisher's exact test. Multivariable analysis was performed to test for independent predictors of discharge mortality. Analyses were performed for the entire cohort, then repeated in a cohort excluding COVIDpositive patients. Results: Of 254 patients who had thrombectomy for acute stroke, 42 (16.5%) died prior to discharge. Mortality was associated with admission WBC count (10.7 [8.9-14] vs. 8.6 [7-12], p=0.0064), admission neutrophil percentage (78% ± 11 vs. 70% ± 14, p=0.0001), peak WBC count (17 [13-22] vs. 12 [8.9-15], p<0.0001), and fever (71% vs. 29%, p<0.0001). In multivariable analysis, admission WBC count (OR 14, CI 1.5-158, p=0.024), neutrophil percentage (OR 1.04, CI 1.0-1.1, p=0.039), peak WBC count (OR 343, CI 27-5702, p<0.0001) and fever (OR 8.6, CI 3.6-23, p<0.0001) were significantly predictive of discharge mortality after controlling for age, admission NIHSS and post-thrombectomy ASPECTS score. Fifteen patients tested positive for COVID-19. In analyses excluding these patients, peak WBC count and fever remained independent predictors of discharge mortality. Conclusions: Elevated markers of inflammation during hospitalization predict discharge mortality in patients who undergo mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Further study is warranted to investigate causation and identify opportunities to improve quality of care in this patient population.

3.
Stroke ; 52(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234365

ABSTRACT

Introduction: While the thrombotic complications of COVID-19 have been described, there are limited data on its implications in hemorrhagic stroke. The clinical characteristics, underlying stroke mechanism, and outcomes in this group of patients are especially salient as empiric therapeutic anticoagulation becomes increasingly common in the treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications of COVID-19. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with hemorrhagic stroke (both nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage) who were hospitalized between 3/1/20-5/15/20 at a NYC hospital system, during the coronavirus pandemic. We compared the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with hemorrhagic stroke and COVID-19 to those without COVID-19 admitted to our hospital between 3/1/20-5/15/20 (contemporary controls) and 3/1/19-5/15/19 (historical controls), using Fischer's exact test and nonparametric testing. We adjusted for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method. Results: During the study period, 19 out of 4071 (0.5%) patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 had hemorrhagic stroke on imaging. Of all COVID-19 with hemorrhagic stroke, only 3 had non-aneurysmal SAH without intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Among hemorrhagic stroke and COVID-19 patients, coagulopathy was the most common etiology (73.7%);empiric anticoagulation was started in 89.5% vs 4.2% of contemporary and 10.0% of historical controls (both with p = <0.001). Compared to contemporary and historical controls, COVID-19 patients had higher initial NIHSS scores, INR, PTT and fibrinogen levels. These patients also had higher rates of in-hospital mortality [84.6% vs. 4.6%, p =<0.001]. Sensitivity analyses excluding patients with strictly subarachnoid hemorrhage yielded similar results. Conclusion: We observed an overall low rate of imaging-confirmed hemorrhagic stroke among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Most hemorrhages in COVID-19 patients occurred in the setting of therapeutic anticoagulation and were associated with increased mortality. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of therapeutic anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients.

4.
Critical Care Medicine ; 48(12):e1211-e1217, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209806

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Hyponatremia occurs in up to 30% of patients with pneumonia and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of hyponatremia associated with coronavirus disease 2019 and the impact on outcome is unknown. We aimed to identify the prevalence, predictors, and impact on outcome of mild, moderate, and severe admission hyponatremia compared with normonatremia among coronavirus disease 2019 patients. DESIGN: Retrospective, multicenter, observational cohort study. SETTING: Four New York City hospitals that are part of the same health network. PATIENTS: Hospitalized, laboratory-confirmed adult coronavirus disease 2019 patients admitted between March 1, 2020, and May 13, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Hyponatremia was categorized as mild (sodium: 130-134 mmol/L), moderate (sodium: 121-129 mmol/L), or severe (sodium: <= 120 mmol/L) versus normonatremia (135-145 mmol/L). The primary outcome was the association of increasing severity of hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Secondary outcomes included encephalopathy, acute renal failure, mechanical ventilation, and discharge home compared across sodium levels using Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests. In exploratory analysis, the association of sodium levels and interleukin-6 levels (which has been linked to nonosmotic release of vasopressin) was assessed. Among 4,645 patient encounters, hyponatremia (sodium < 135 mmol/L) occurred in 1,373 (30%) and 374 of 1,373 (27%) required invasive mechanical ventilation. Mild, moderate, and severe hyponatremia occurred in 1,032 (22%), 305 (7%), and 36 (1%) patients, respectively. Each level of worsening hyponatremia conferred 43% increased odds of in-hospital death after adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index, past medical history, admission laboratory abnormalities, admission Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, renal failure, encephalopathy, and mechanical ventilation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43;95% CI, 1.08-1.88;p = 0.012). Increasing severity of hyponatremia was associated with encephalopathy, mechanical ventilation, and decreased probability of discharge home (all p < 0.001). Higher interleukin-6 levels correlated with lower sodium levels (p = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Hyponatremia occurred in nearly a third of coronavirus disease 2019 patients, was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, and was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy and mechanical ventilation.

5.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 42(2): 279-284, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Various patterns of leukoencephalopathy have been described in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this article, we aimed to describe the clinical and imaging features of acute disseminated leukoencephalopathy in critically ill patients with COVID-19 and the imaging evolution during a short-term follow-up. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified and reviewed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and outcomes for 8 critically ill patients with COVID-19 with acute disseminated leukoencephalopathy. RESULTS: All patients demonstrated multiple areas of white matter changes in both cerebral hemispheres; 87.5% (7/8) of patients had a posterior predilection. Four patients (50%) had short-term follow-up imaging within a median of 17 days after the first MR imaging; they developed brain atrophy, and their white matter lesions evolved into necrotizing cystic cavitations. All (8/8) patients had inflammatory cytokine release syndrome as demonstrated by elevated interleukin-6, D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin levels. Most (7/8; 87.5%) patients were on prolonged ventilator support (median, 44.5 days; interquartile range, 20.5 days). These patients had poor functional outcomes (6/8 [75%] patients were discharged with mRS 5) and high mortality (2/8, 25%). CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 can develop acute disseminated leukoencephalopathy that evolves into cystic degeneration of white matter lesions with brain atrophy during a short period, which we dubbed virus-associated necrotizing disseminated acute leukoencephalopathy. This may be the result of COVID-19-related endothelial injury, cytokine storm, or thrombotic microangiopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Aged , Atrophy , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Humans , Leukoencephalopathies/etiology , Leukoencephalopathies/mortality , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Thrombosis/etiology , Treatment Outcome , White Matter/diagnostic imaging
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