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1.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 25(1): 88-91, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726283

ABSTRACT

Background: Headache is one of the commonly reported symptoms of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) illness. A number of studies have been done so far focusing on headache associated with COVID-19 with variable incidence and characteristics. Material and Methods: This study is a prospective study conducted on 120 patients with confirmed COVID-19 illness. Critically ill and ventilated patients were excluded. Demographic data, COVID illness symptom profile, headache characteristics were documented. Patients were followed up at 2 weeks and 4 weeks. For the statistical analysis, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 24.0 was used. Results: 120 COVID-19 positive cases were included in the study with a mean age of 54.59 ± 14.89 years (range 21-84 years) with male-to-female ratio of 3:2. 78.33% (94) of patients had various comorbidities. 43.33% (52) cases were diabetic. The presenting symptoms were fever (65%), cough (53.33%), shortness of breath (35%) and myalgia (31.66%). 26 (21.66%) patients reported headache during the COVID illness. 18 (15%) cases had headache attributed as secondary to COVID-19 illness. Out of them, 12 cases were new onset with no past history of headache and 6 cases had a significant change in previous headache episodes. COVID-19 illness precipitated headache episodes similar to past headache type in 8 cases. Headache was the presenting symptom in 8 (6.66%) patients with COVID-19 being detected in the regular hospital screening protocol. Conclusion: Headache was a common symptom in COVID-19 patients. New onset headaches or change in past headache type in patients in the setting of ongoing pandemic should be screened for COVID-19.

3.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 24(5): 703-707, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has a major bearing on mental health. This study was aimed to study the level of stress among the medical and dental students amidst this crisis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to students pursuing medical and dental undergraduate and postgraduate degrees across India. It included sociodemographics, psychological status, academic activities, online classes, information about COVID-19, and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). RESULTS: The overall response rate was 86%. 9.8% of students had low, 74.4% had moderate, and 15.8% had high stress according to PSS. The major worry was uncertain future (41.8%); academic inadequacies/delays (27.78%), apprehension of self-health (26.78%), and family's health (21.13%). 52.7% of participants experienced a lack of motivation; 74% were frustrated/irritable and 46.3% experienced loneliness. Their access to information about COVID-19 was from family and friends (71.42%); news (64.48%), social media sites (62.79%), Internet (36.87%), and newspapers (34.71%). Females were more stressed (P value = 0.000) with ages 21-25 years (P value = 0.000). The students who were motivated, frustrated/irritable, or lonely had high stress (P value <0.01). The students with no exercise had high stress (P value <0.01), however, the duration of exercise was not statistically significant. 58% were not satisfied with the online classes (P value <0.01). INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that more than three-fourths of medical and dental students were under moderate to high-level stress. Multiple factors for the stress were identified. Exercise was a stress buster, which should be encouraged for good mental health. In view of the uncertain future identified as the major worry, it is prudent for health educators to change the curriculum to keep pace with the existing competency of training.

4.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429:N.PAG-N.PAG, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1461556
5.
J Relig Health ; 60(2): 654-662, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103500

ABSTRACT

During life challenging times like the present COVID-19 pandemic, the health care worker (HCW) is faced with a number of questions of an existential nature. There is a sense of guilt, anguish, helplessness, uncertainty and powerlessness when one is fighting something on such a powerful scale with limited resources and no definite end in sight. There are circumstances when these feelings can overwhelm a person leading to demoralization and potentially a moral injury. Spiritual practices and advice may help to deal with moral paradoxes and ethical dilemmas when other secular supports are undermined or inaccessible. The Holy Indian Epic, the Bhagvad Gita has described the moral distress of the warrior Arjuna, during the battle of Kurukshetra and the advice given to him by the Lord Krishna the gist of which can be encapsulated in the form of the four Ds- Detachment, Duty, Doer-ship and Dhyana or meditation. In this article, the authors explore how these concepts may be useful aids to the HCW faced with moral and psychological distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hinduism/psychology , Morals , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Humans , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Neurol ; 11: 664, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-658453

ABSTRACT

With the rapid pace and scale of the emerging coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a growing body of evidence has shown a strong association of COVID-19 with pre- and post- neurological complications. This has necessitated the need to incorporate targeted neurological care for this subgroup of patients which warrants further reorganization of services, healthcare workforce, and ongoing management of chronic neurological cases. The social distancing and the shutdown imposed by several nations in the midst of COVID-19 have severely impacted the ongoing care, access and support of patients with chronic neurological conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis, Epilepsy, Neuromuscular Disorders, Migraine, Dementia, and Parkinson disease. There is a pressing need for governing bodies including national and international professional associations, health ministries and health institutions to harmonize policies, guidelines, and recommendations relating to the management of chronic neurological conditions. These harmonized guidelines should ensure patient continuity across the spectrum of hospital and community care including the well-being, safety, and mental health of the patients, their care partners and the health professionals involved. This article provides an in-depth analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on chronic neurological conditions and specific recommendations to minimize the potential harm to those at high risk.

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