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1.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 88(3): 299-304, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We assessed the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on HIV suppression rates in people living with HIV (PLWH) attending a large Italian HIV clinic. SETTING: The HIV outpatient clinic of the Infectious Diseases Department of Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy, which serves more than 5000 PLWH per year. METHODS: A before and after quasi-experimental study design was used to make a retrospective assessment of the monthly trend of HIV-RNA determinations of ≥50 among the PLWH attending our clinic, with "before" being the period from January 1, 2016 to February 20, 2020, and "after" being the period from February 21, 2020 to December 31, 2020 (the COVID-19 period). Interrupted time series analysis was used to evaluate any changes in the trend. RESULTS: During the study period, 70,349 HIV-RNA viral load determinations were made, and the percentage of HIV-RNA viral load determinations of <50 copies/mL increased from 88.4% in 2016 to 93.2% in 2020 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant monthly trend toward a decrease in the number of HIV-RNA determinations of ≥50 copies/mL before the pandemic (ß -0.084; standard error 0.015; P < 0.001), and this did not significantly change after it started (ß -0.039, standard error 0.161; P = 0.811). CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of viral suppression was maintained among the PLWH referring to our clinic, despite the structural barriers raised by the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of simplified methods of delivering care (such as teleconsultations and multiple antiretroviral treatment prescriptions) may have contributed to preserving this continuum.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Anti-HIV Agents/administration & dosage , Delivery of Health Care/methods , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV-1 , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load/drug effects
2.
J Infect ; 83(2): 237-279, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244767

ABSTRACT

Data are presented of 368/503 post-COVID-19 outpatients followed within the AntiCROWN Cohort who have a one-year control and a baseline assessment of anti-S1/S2 antibodies, detected with the The LIAISON® SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG solution by DiaSorin. Loss of response occurred in 4 subjects having a baseline level below 50 AU/mL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Preliminary Data , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(8): 2023, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203640
4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2276-2278, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153165

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the clinical outcomes of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infected with SARS-CoV-2. We describe 47 patients referred to our hospital between 21 February and 16 April 2020 with proven/probable COVID-19, 45 (96%) of whom fully recovered and 2 who died.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
HIV Med ; 22(5): 372-378, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998932

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A prior T cell depletion induced by HIV infection may carry deleterious consequences in the current COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical data on patients co-infected with HIV and SARS-CoV-2 are still scarce. METHODS: This multicentre cohort study evaluated risk factors for morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 in people living with HIV (PLWH), infected with SARS-CoV-2 in three countries in different clinical settings. COVID-19 was clinically classified as to be mild-to-moderate or severe. RESULTS: Of 175 patients, 49 (28%) had severe COVID-19 and 7 (4%) patients died. Almost all patients were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and in 94%, HIV RNA was below 50 copies/mL prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. In the univariate analysis, an age 50 years or older, a CD4+ T cell nadir of < 200/µl, current CD4+ T cells < 350/µl and the presence of at least one comorbidity were significantly associated with severity of COVID-19. No significant association was found for gender, ethnicity, obesity, a detectable HIV RNA, a prior AIDS-defining illness, or tenofovir (which was mainly given as alafenamide) or protease inhibitor use in the current ART. In a multivariate analysis, the only factor associated with risk for severe COVID-19 was a current CD4+ T cell count of < 350/µl (adjusted odds ratio 2.85, 95% confidence interval 1.26-6.44, p=0.01). The only factor associated with mortality was a low CD4 T cell nadir. CONCLUSIONS: In PLWH, immune deficiency is a possible risk factor for severe COVID-19, even in the setting of virological suppression. There is no evidence for a protective effect of PIs or tenofovir alafenamide.


Subject(s)
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active/methods , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Cohort Studies , Coinfection , Germany/epidemiology , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV Infections/mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/genetics , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology , Viral Load , Young Adult
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