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1.
Antimicrob Agents Chemother ; : AAC0210721, 2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571139

ABSTRACT

In this phase II, open-label, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 115 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and systemic inflammation, early use of sarilumab was associated with a low risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring high-flow devices or mechanical ventilation. Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of early treatment with sarilumab, added to standard of care (SOC), in hospitalised adults with COVID-19. Methods: Phase II, open-label, randomized, controlled clinical trial of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and interleukin (IL)-6 levels ≥ 40 pg/mL and/or D-dimer > 1500 ng/mL. Participants were randomized (1:1:1) to receive SOC (control group), SOC plus a single subcutaneous dose of sarilumab 200 mg (Sarilumab-200) or SOC plus a single subcutaneous dose of sarilumab 400 mg (Sarilumab-400). The primary outcome variable was the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring high-flow nasal oxygenation (HFNO), non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) at day 28. Results: One-hundred and fifteen participants (control group, n = 39; Sarilumab-200, n = 37; Sarilumab-400, n = 39) were included. At randomization, 104 (90%) patients had supplemental oxygen and 103 (90%) received corticosteroids. Eleven (28%) patients in the control group, ten (27%) in Sarilumab-200 and five (13%) in Sarilumab-400 developed the primary outcome (hazard ratio [95% CI] of Sarilumab-400 vs control group: 0.41 [0.14-1.18]; p=0.09). Seven (6%) patients died: three in the control group and four in Sarilumab-200. There were no deaths in Sarilumab-400 (p = 0.079, log-rank test for comparisons with the control group). Conclusion: In patients recently hospitalised with COVID-19 pneumonia and features of systemic inflammation, early IL-6 blockade with a single dose of sarilumab 400 mg was safe and associated with a trend for better outcomes.

2.
JAMA ; 326(6): 499-518, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413703

ABSTRACT

Importance: Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of IL-6 antagonists in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 have variously reported benefit, no effect, and harm. Objective: To estimate the association between administration of IL-6 antagonists compared with usual care or placebo and 28-day all-cause mortality and other outcomes. Data Sources: Trials were identified through systematic searches of electronic databases between October 2020 and January 2021. Searches were not restricted by trial status or language. Additional trials were identified through contact with experts. Study Selection: Eligible trials randomly assigned patients hospitalized for COVID-19 to a group in whom IL-6 antagonists were administered and to a group in whom neither IL-6 antagonists nor any other immunomodulators except corticosteroids were administered. Among 72 potentially eligible trials, 27 (37.5%) met study selection criteria. Data Extraction and Synthesis: In this prospective meta-analysis, risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. Inconsistency among trial results was assessed using the I2 statistic. The primary analysis was an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis of odds ratios (ORs) for 28-day all-cause mortality. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality at 28 days after randomization. There were 9 secondary outcomes including progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or death and risk of secondary infection by 28 days. Results: A total of 10 930 patients (median age, 61 years [range of medians, 52-68 years]; 3560 [33%] were women) participating in 27 trials were included. By 28 days, there were 1407 deaths among 6449 patients randomized to IL-6 antagonists and 1158 deaths among 4481 patients randomized to usual care or placebo (summary OR, 0.86 [95% CI, 0.79-0.95]; P = .003 based on a fixed-effects meta-analysis). This corresponds to an absolute mortality risk of 22% for IL-6 antagonists compared with an assumed mortality risk of 25% for usual care or placebo. The corresponding summary ORs were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.74-0.92; P < .001) for tocilizumab and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.86-1.36; P = .52) for sarilumab. The summary ORs for the association with mortality compared with usual care or placebo in those receiving corticosteroids were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.87) for tocilizumab and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.61-1.38) for sarilumab. The ORs for the association with progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or death, compared with usual care or placebo, were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.70-0.85) for all IL-6 antagonists, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66-0.82) for tocilizumab, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.74-1.34) for sarilumab. Secondary infections by 28 days occurred in 21.9% of patients treated with IL-6 antagonists vs 17.6% of patients treated with usual care or placebo (OR accounting for trial sample sizes, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.85-1.16). Conclusions and Relevance: In this prospective meta-analysis of clinical trials of patients hospitalized for COVID-19, administration of IL-6 antagonists, compared with usual care or placebo, was associated with lower 28-day all-cause mortality. Trial Registration: PROSPERO Identifier: CRD42021230155.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Coinfection , Disease Progression , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial
3.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e039951, 2020 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944946

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: About 25% of patients with COVID-19 develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with a high release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). The aim of the SARICOR study is to demonstrate that early administration of sarilumab (an IL-6 receptor inhibitor) in hospitalised patients with COVID-19, pulmonary infiltrates and a high IL-6 or D-dimer serum level could reduce the progression of ARDS requiring high-flow nasal oxygen or mechanical ventilation (non-invasive or invasive). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Phase II, open-label, randomised, multicentre, controlled clinical trial to study the efficacy and safety of the administration of two doses of sarilumab (200 and 400 mg) plus best available therapy (BAT) in hospitalised adults with COVID-19 presenting cytokine release syndrome. This strategy will be compared with a BAT control group. The efficacy and safety will be monitored up to 28 days postadministration. A total of 120 patients will be recruited (40 patients in each arm). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The clinical trial has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the coordinating centre and authorised by the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Products. If the hypothesis is verified, the dissemination of the results could change clinical practice by increasing early administration of sarilumab in adult patients with COVID-19 presenting cytokine release syndrome, thus reducing intensive care unit admissions. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04357860.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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