Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 3 de 3
Filter
Add filters

Language
Year range
1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324909

ABSTRACT

Background: Widespread viral and serological testing for SARS-CoV-2 may present a unique opportunity to also test for HIV infection. We estimated the potential impact of adding linked, opt-out HIV testing alongside SARS-CoV-2 testing on HIV incidence and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in six US cities.Methods: We calibrated a dynamic compartmental HIV transmission model to match the epidemiological characteristics of six US cities (Atlanta, Baltimore, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Seattle). For each city, we constructed three sets of scenarios: (1) sustained current levels of HIV-related treatment and prevention services (status quo);(2) temporary disruptions in health services and changes in sexual and injection risk behaviours at discrete levels between 0%-50%;and (3) linked HIV and SARS-CoV-2 testing offered to 10%-90% of the adult population in addition to scenario (2). We estimated cumulative HIV infections between 2020-2025, as well as incremental costs, quality-adjusted life years, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of linked HIV testing over 20 years.Findings: In the absence of linked, opt-out HIV testing, we estimated a best-case scenario (50% reduction in risk behaviours and no service disruptions) of 6,733 fewer HIV infections between 2020-2025 (16.5% decrease), and a worst-case scenario (no behavioural change and 50% reduction in service access) of 3,669 additional HIV infections (9.0% increase) across cities. If HIV testing could be offered to 10%-90% of the adult population, we estimated that a total of 576-7,225 (1.6%-17.2%) new infections could be averted. The intervention would require an initial investment of $20M-$218M across cities;however, the intervention would ultimately result in savings in health care costs in each city.Interpretation: Although COVID-19-related disruptions in HIV-related services may increase or decrease HIV incidence, a campaign in which HIV testing is linked with SARS-CoV-2 testing could substantially reduce HIV incidence and reduce direct and indirect health care costs attributable to HIV.Funding Statement: US NIH-NIDA Grant No. R01-DA041747Declaration of Interests: XZ, EK, SC, MP, WSA, CNB, CDR, DJF, BDLM, SHM, JM, LRM, BRS, SAS and BN declare no competing interests.

2.
Am J Prev Med ; 61(3): 369-376, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258300

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted healthcare services, reducing opportunities to conduct routine hepatitis C virus antibody screening, clinical care, and treatment. Therefore, people living with undiagnosed hepatitis C virus during the pandemic may later become identified at more advanced stages of the disease, leading to higher morbidity and mortality rates. Further, unidentified hepatitis C virus-infected individuals may continue to unknowingly transmit the virus to others. METHODS: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, data were evaluated from a large national reference clinical laboratory and from national estimates of dispensed prescriptions for hepatitis C virus treatment. Investigators estimated the average number of hepatitis C virus antibody tests, hepatitis C virus antibody-positive test results, and hepatitis C virus RNA-positive test results by month in January-July for 2018 and 2019, compared with the same months in 2020. To assess the impact of hepatitis C virus treatment, dispensed hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiretroviral medications were examined for the same time periods. Statistical analyses of trends were performed using negative binomial models. RESULTS: Compared with the 2018 and 2019 months, hepatitis C virus antibody testing volume decreased 59% during April 2020 and rebounded to a 6% reduction in July 2020. The number of hepatitis C virus RNA-positive results fell by 62% in March 2020 and remained 39% below the baseline by July 2020. For hepatitis C virus treatment, prescriptions decreased 43% in May, 37% in June, and 38% in July relative to the corresponding months in 2018 and 2019. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, continued public health messaging, interventions and outreach programs to restore hepatitis C virus testing and treatment to prepandemic levels, and maintenance of public health efforts to eliminate hepatitis C infections remain important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis C , Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C/diagnosis , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(11): e828-e834, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Widespread viral and serological testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may present a unique opportunity to also test for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We estimated the potential impact of adding linked, opt-out HIV testing alongside SARS-CoV-2 testing on the HIV incidence and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in 6 US cities. METHODS: Using a previously calibrated dynamic HIV transmission model, we constructed 3 sets of scenarios for each city: (1) sustained current levels of HIV-related treatment and prevention services (status quo); (2) temporary disruptions in health services and changes in sexual and injection risk behaviors at discrete levels between 0%-50%; and (3) linked HIV and SARS-CoV-2 testing offered to 10%-90% of the adult population in addition to Scenario 2. We estimated the cumulative number of HIV infections between 2020-2025 and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of linked HIV testing over 20 years. RESULTS: In the absence of linked, opt-out HIV testing, we estimated a total of a 16.5% decrease in HIV infections between 2020-2025 in the best-case scenario (50% reduction in risk behaviors and no service disruptions), and a 9.0% increase in the worst-case scenario (no behavioral change and 50% reduction in service access). We estimated that HIV testing (offered at 10%-90% levels) could avert a total of 576-7225 (1.6%-17.2%) new infections. The intervention would require an initial investment of $20.6M-$220.7M across cities; however, the intervention would ultimately result in savings in health-care costs in each city. CONCLUSIONS: A campaign in which HIV testing is linked with SARS-CoV-2 testing could substantially reduce the HIV incidence and reduce direct and indirect health care costs attributable to HIV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , HIV Infections , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Cities , Cost-Benefit Analysis , HIV , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL