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1.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther ; 2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909559

ABSTRACT

We hypothesized that exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) could be implied in the pathogenesis of thromboembolic complications in COVID-19. We isolated circulating exosomes from COVID-19 patients and then we divided our population in two arms based on the D-dimer level on hospital admission. We observed that exosomal miR-145 and miR-885 significantly correlate with D-Dimer levels. Moreover, we demonstrate that human endothelial cells express the main cofactors needed for SARS-CoV-2 internalization, including ACE2, TMPRSS2, and CD-147. Interestingly, human endothelial cells treated with serum from COVID-19 patients release significantly less miR-145 and miR-885, exhibit increased apoptosis, and display significantly impaired angiogenetic properties compared to cells treated with non-COVID-19 serum. Taken together, our data indicate that exosomal miR-145 and miR-885 are essential in modulating thromboembolic events in COVID-19. Significance Statement In this work, we demonstrate for the first time that two specific microRNA (namely miR-145 and miR-885) contained in circulating exosomes are functionally involved in thromboembolic events in COVID-19. Our findings are especially relevant to the general audience when considering the emerging prominence of post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 systemic manifestations known as Long-COVID.

2.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(5): 562-565, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of an innovative model of HCV micro-elimination in a hospital setting in an area of high HCV prevalence. PATIENTS AND METODS: Between January and December 2019, a prospective, interventional study for a program of HCV case-finding and linkage-to-care was performed in S. Anna and S. Sebastiano hospital of Caserta, in Campania, a region in southern Italy. All adult patients who were admitted to the Caserta hospital in the study period and resulted positive for anti-HCV were included in the study. The outcomes evaluated were the number of subjects resulting HCV-RNA-positive, those linked-to-care and treated with a DAA and the subjects whose anti-HCV-status was unknown. RESULTS: In the study period, 14,396 subjects, admitted to the hospital for different reasons, were tested for anti-HCV: 529 (3.7%) subjects resulted positive for anti-HCV. Of the 529 anti-HCV-positive subjects, 10 died during hospitalization and 243 were already treated with a DAA. The remaining 276 subjects were contacted and agreed to be evaluated. Of these 276 subjects, 68 patients resulted HCV- RNA-negative and 194 HCV-RNA-positive and 180 of these were treated with a DAA according to the international guidelines. DISCUSSION: A simple, rapid, inexpensive model of HCV micro-elimination in the hospital setting allowed us to find anti-HCV-positive subjects with unknown anti-HCV status or not linked to a clinical center.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis C, Chronic , Hepatitis C , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Hepacivirus/genetics , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Hepatitis C/prevention & control , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Prospective Studies , RNA/therapeutic use
3.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 2318, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815536

ABSTRACT

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are characterized by blunted immune responses, which are affected by glycaemic control. Whether glycaemic control influences the response to COVID-19 vaccines and the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections is unknown. Here we show that poor glycaemic control, assessed as mean HbA1c in the post-vaccination period, is associated with lower immune responses and an increased incidence of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections in T2D patients vaccinated with mRNA-BNT162b2. We report data from a prospective observational study enroling healthcare and educator workers with T2D receiving the mRNA-BNT162b2 vaccine in Campania (Italy) and followed for one year (5 visits, follow-up 346 ± 49 days) after one full vaccination cycle. Considering the 494 subjects completing the study, patients with good glycaemic control (HbA1c one-year mean < 7%) show a higher virus-neutralizing antibody capacity and a better CD4 + T/cytokine response, compared with those with poor control (HbA1c one-year mean ≥ 7%). The one-year mean of HbA1c is linearly associated with the incidence of breakthrough infections (Beta = 0.068; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.032-0.103; p < 0.001). The comparison of patients with poor and good glycaemic control through Cox regression also show an increased risk for patients with poor control (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.261; 95% CI, 0.097-0.700; p = 0.008). Among other factors, only smoking (HR = 0.290, CI 0.146-0.576 for non-smokers; p < 0.001) and sex (HR = 0.105, CI 0.035-0.317 for females; p < 0.001) are significantly associated with the incidence of breakthrough infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A , Glycemic Control , Humans , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Biology (Basel) ; 11(4)2022 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792833

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to the hospitalization of an unselected population with the possibility to evaluate the epidemiology of viral hepatitis. Thus, a retrospective multicenter study was conducted in an area of Southern Italy with the aim of assessing the prevalence of HCV and HBV markers and the ability of current screening program to capture cases. We evaluated 2126 hospitalized patients in seven COVID Centers of Naples and Caserta area in which 70% of the Campania population lives. HBsAg and HCV-Ab prevalence was 1.6% and 5.1%, respectively, with no differences between gender. Decade distribution for birth year shows a bimodal trend of HCV prevalence, with a peak (11.6%) in the decade 1930-1939 and a second peak (5.6%) for those born in 1960-1969. An analysis of the screening period imposed by the Italian government for those born between 1969 and 1989 shows that only 17% of cases of HCV infection could be captured. A small alignment of the screening period, i.e., those born from 1960 to 1984, would capture 40% of cases. The data confirm the high endemicity of our geographical area for hepatitis virus infections and underline the need for a tailored screening program according to the regional epidemiology.

5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 5771, 2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778635

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is still a health problem worldwide despite the availability of vaccines. Therefore, there is a need for effective and safe antiviral. SARS-CoV-2 and HCV necessitate RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for replication; therefore, it has been hypothesized that RdRp inhibitors used to treat HCV may be effective treating SARS-CoV-2. Accordingly, we evaluated the effect of the sofosbuvir/velpatasvir (SOF/VEL) combination in early SARS-CoV-2 infection. A multicenter case-control study was conducted, enrolling 120 patients with mild or moderate COVID-19, of whom 30, HCV coinfected or not, received SOF/VEL tablets (400/100 mg) once daily for 9 days within a median of 6 days from the beginning of infection and 90 controls were treated with standard care. The primary endpoint was the effect on viral clearance, and the secondary endpoint was the improvement of clinical outcomes. Nasal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR were performed every 5-7 days. Between 5-14 days after starting SOF/VEL treatment, SAS-CoV-2 clearance was observed in 83% of patients, while spontaneous clearance in the control was 13% (p < 0.001). An earlier SARS-CoV-2 clearance was observed in the SOF/VEL group than in the control group (median 14 vs 22 days, respectively, p < 0.001) also when the first positivity was considered. None of the patients in the SOF/VEL group showed disease progression, while in the control group, 24% required more intensive treatment (high flow oxygen or noninvasive/invasive ventilation), and one patient died (p < 0.01). No significant side effects were observed in the SOF/VEL group. Early SOF/VEL treatment in mild/moderate COVID-19 seems to be safe and effective for faster elimination of SARS-CoV-2 and to prevent disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis C , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbamates , Case-Control Studies , Disease Progression , Genotype , Hepacivirus/genetics , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Heterocyclic Compounds, 4 or More Rings/adverse effects , Humans , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , SARS-CoV-2 , Sofosbuvir , Treatment Outcome
6.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329936

ABSTRACT

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are characterized by blunted immune responses, which are affected by glycaemic control. Whether glycaemic control influences the response to COVID-19 vaccines and the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections is unknown. To explore the association between glycaemic control and immune responses or breakthrough infections in patients with T2D after mRNA-BNT162b2 vaccination, we conducted a prospective observational study among healthcare and educator workers with T2D receiving the mRNA-BNT162b2 vaccine in Campania (Italy). Patients were followed for one year (5 visits) after one full vaccination cycle to evaluate immune responses and monitor the incidence of breakthrough infections. The one-year mean of HbA1c values and canonical risk factors were used to estimate their association with breakthrough infections through Cox regression models adjusted for multiple variables. Overall, 494 subjects were followed up for 346 ± 49 days and completed the study. Patients with good glycaemic control (HbA1c one-year mean < 7%) showed a higher virus-neutralizing antibody capacity and a better CD4 + T/cytokine response, compared with those with poor control (HbA1c one-year mean ≥ 7%). One-year mean of HbA1c was significantly associated with the incidence of breakthrough infections (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.285;95% confidence interval [CI], 0.106 to 0.768;p = 0.013). Among other factors, only smoking status was associated with the incidence of breakthrough infections (HR = 0.360, CI 0.181–0.716 for non-smokers). In summary, poor glycaemic control, assessed as mean HbA1c in the post-vaccination period, is associated with lower immune responses and an increased incidence of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections in T2D patients vaccinated with mRNA-BNT162b2.

9.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367924

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The Global Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has resulted in explosive patterns of transmission in most countries. Nasopharyngeal swabs were the specimen's collection tools recommended for the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and for monitoring infection outbreaks in communities. Our objective was to report the quality and efficacy of unsupervised self-collected mid turbinate "dry FLOQSwabs" (MT FLOQSwabs) (56380CS01, Copan). There were 111 specimens collected for the study: 36 by health care personnel, from themselves, to verify the quality and efficacy of mid-turbinate swabs; 75 to compare and assess the diagnostic performance, among health care personnel, of nasopharyngeal swabs and self-collected mid-turbinate FLOQSwabs. A collection of 51 specimens was enrolled to define the efficacy of the Testami program (validation). Our analyses demonstrate that self-collected mid-turbinate dry swabs ensure an accuracy of 97.3%, as compared to the standard nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health care workers. Furthermore, the mid-turbinate FLOQSwabs can be stored without medium for six days at room temperature without affecting the molecular diagnosis of the SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Self-collection of diagnostic specimens at home could offer an avenue to increase testing availability for SARS-CoV-2 infection without asking people to travel to a clinic or a laboratory, thus reducing people's exposure to infection. Our findings demonstrate that unsupervised self-collection swabs, transported dry, are sensitive, practical and easy-to-use tools and should be considered for diagnosis of SARS-COV-2 and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Specimen Handling , Turbinates/virology , Humans , Nasopharynx/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling/instrumentation , Specimen Handling/methods
10.
Front Oncol ; 11: 662746, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity presentation between oncologic and non-oncologic patients and to evaluate the impact of cancer type and stage on COVID-19 course. METHODS: We performed a multicentre, retrospective study involving 13 COVID-19 Units in Campania region from February to May 2020. We defined as severe COVID-19 presentation the cases that required mechanical ventilation and/or admission to Intensive Care Units (ICU) and/or in case of death. RESULTS: We enrolled 371 COVID-19 patients, of whom 34 (9.2%) had a history or a diagnosis of cancer (24 solid, 6 onco-hematological). Oncologic patients were older (p<0.001), had more comorbidities (p<0.001) and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 presentation (p=0.001) and of death (p<0.001). Compared to 12 patients with non-active cancer and to 337 without cancer, the 17 patients with active cancer had more comorbidities and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 and of mortality (all p values <0.001). Compared to the 281 non-severe patients, the 90 subjects with a severe presentation of COVID-19 were older (p<0.01), with more comorbidities (p<0.001) and with a higher rate of cancer (p=0.001). At multivariate analysis, age (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.11) and suffering from cancer in an active stage (OR 5.33, 95% CI: 1.77-16.53) were independently associated with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Since the higher risk of severe evolution of COVID-19, cancer patients, especially those with an active malignancy, should be candidates for early evaluation of symptoms and early treatment for COVID-19.

11.
Life (Basel) ; 11(4)2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194689

ABSTRACT

To describe epidemiological and clinical features of patients confirmed as having SARS-CoV-2 infection and managed in isolation at home. We performed a multicenter retrospective study enrolling all SARS-CoV-2-positive adults evaluated from 28 February to 31 May 2020 at one of nine COVID-19 Units in southern Italy: we included patients receiving care at home and those admitted to hospital. We defined patients with not-severe disease if they were asymptomatic or experienced a mild infection that did not need oxygen (O2) therapy and those with a severe infection if hospitalized and required O2 therapy. We enrolled 415 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection: 77 were managed in isolation at home, 338 required hospital management. The 77 patients in home isolation were less frequently male than hospitalized patients (55% vs. 64%; <0.01) and were younger (median age 45 years (IQR:19) vs. 62 (IQR 22); p < 0.01), had a lower Charlson comorbidity index (median 0 (IQR2) vs. 6 (IQR 3); p < 0.01), and included fewer subjects with an underlying chronic disease (36% vs. 59%; p < 0.01). According to a binomial logistic regression analysis, a younger age (OR: 0.96 (95% IC: 0.94-0.98), p < 0.01) and a low Charlson comorbidity index (OR: 0.66 (95% IC: 0.54-0.83); p < 0.01) were independent factors associated with at-home management. The identification of subjects with SARS-CoV-2 infection who could be managed in home isolation is useful in clinical practice. A younger age and no comorbidities were identified as factors independently associated with home management.

12.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol ; 17(3): 201-208, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066078

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In people living with HIV (PLWH), immune activation and inflammation levels are high even when viral suppression is maintained, potentially contributing to several comorbidities, and hampering the immune response to infections such as the recent SARS-CoV-2 disease 2019 (COVID-19). AREAS COVERED: Immune activation and inflammation play a role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Severe COVID-19 patients may experience cytokine release syndrome (CRS), leading to alveolar damage, pulmonary fibrinolysis, dysregulated coagulation, and pulmonary injury. Into the systemic circulation, cytokines in excess might leak out of pulmonary circulation, causing systemic symptoms and possibly a multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome. Preexisting comorbidities are also linked to worse COVID-19 outcome: studies suggest that diabetes and hypertension are linked to higher mortality rates. Such comorbidities are more frequent in PLWH, but it is unclear if they have worse outcomes in the case of COVID-19. The literature was searched in PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE, and manually in COVID-19 resources. EXPERT OPINION: A body of evidence shows that HIV and SARS-CoV-2 are able to activate inflammatory pathways, acute in the case of SARS-CoV-2, chronic in the case of HIV, while the comorbidities seem to represent, in the first case, a contributory cause, in the second an effect of the virus-induced damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/immunology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/epidemiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , Comorbidity , Cytokines/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/immunology , Inflammation , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 20(1): 373, 2020 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypertension is the most frequent co-morbidity in patients with covid-19 infection, and we might speculate that a specific blood group could play a key role in the clinical outcome of hypertensive patients with covid-19. METHODS: In this prospective study, we compared 0 vs. non-0 blood group in hypertensive patients with covid-19 infection. In these patients, we evaluated inflammatory and thrombotic status, cardiac injury, and death events. RESULTS: Patients in non-0 (n = 92) vs. 0 blood group (n = 72) had significantly different values of activated pro-thrombin time, D-dimer, and thrombotic indexes as Von Willebrand factor and Factor VIII (p < 0.05). Furthermore, patients in non-0 vs. 0 blood group had higher rate of cardiac injury (10 (13.9%) vs. 27 (29.3%)) and death, (6 (8.3%) vs. 18 (19.6%)), (p < 0.05). At the multivariate analysis, Interleukin-6 (1.118, CI 95% 1.067-1.171) and non-0 blood group (2.574, CI 95% 1.207-5.490) were independent predictors of cardiac injury in hypertensive patients with covid-19. D-dimer (1.082, CI 95% 1.027-1.140), Interleukin-6 (1.216, CI 95% 1.082-1.367) and non-0 blood group (3.706, CI 95% 1.223-11.235) were independent predictors of deaths events in hypertensive patients with covid-19. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our data indicate that non-0 covid-19 hypertensive patients have significantly higher values of pro-thrombotic indexes, as well as higher rate of cardiac injury and deaths compared to 0 patients. Moreover, AB0 blood type influences worse prognosis in hypertensive patients with covid-19 infection.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Pressure , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Hypertension/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Factors/analysis , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/physiopathology , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(17): e016948, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the cause of a pandemic disease, with severe acute respiratory syndrome by binding target epithelial lung cells through angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in humans. Thus, patients with hypertension with COVID-19 could have worse prognosis. Indeed, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers may interfere with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 expression/activity. Thus, patients with hypertension undergoing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and/or angiotensin receptor blockers drug therapy may be at a higher risk of contracting a serious COVID-19 infection and should be monitored. Moreover, in the present study we investigated the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor versus angiotensin receptor blockers versus calcium channel blockers on clinical outcomes as mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admissions, heart injury, and death in 62 patients with hypertension hospitalized for COVID-19 infection. METHODS AND RESULTS The multicenter study was prospectively conducted at Department of Infectious Diseases of Sant'Anna Hospital of Caserta, and of University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli" of Naples, at Department of Advanced Surgical and Medical Sciences of University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli," Naples, and at General Medical Assistance Unit "FIMG," Naples, Italy. Lowest values of left ventricle ejection fraction predicted deaths (1.142, 1.008-1.294, P<0.05), while highest values of interleukin-6 predicted the admission to intensive care unit (1.617, 1.094-2.389), mechanical ventilation (1.149, 1.082-1.219), heart injuries (1.367, 1.054-1.772), and deaths (4.742, 1.788-8.524). CONCLUSIONS Anti-hypertensive drugs didn't affect the prognosis in patients with COVID-19. Consequently, tailored anti-inflammatory and immune therapies in addition to chronic antihypertensive therapy, could prevent a worse prognosis, as well as improve the clinical outcomes in patients with hypertension with COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Blood Pressure/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/physiopathology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Diabetes Care ; 43(7): 1408-1415, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324249

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: An important prognostic factor in any form of infection seems to be glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. There is no information about the effects of tight glycemic control on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes in patients with hyperglycemia. Therefore, we examined the effects of optimal glycemic control in patients with hyperglycemia affected by COVID-19. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifty-nine patients with COVID-19 hospitalized with moderate disease were evaluated. On the basis of admission glycemia >7.77 mmol/L, patients were divided into hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and D-dimer levels were evaluated at admission and weekly during hospitalization. The composite end point was severe disease, admission to an intensive care unit, use of mechanical ventilation, or death. RESULTS: Thirty-four (57.6%) patients were normoglycemic and 25 (42.4%) were hyperglycemic. In the hyperglycemic group, 7 (28%) and 18 (72%) patients were diagnosed with diabetes already before admission, and 10 (40%) and 15 (60%) were treated without and with insulin infusion, respectively. The mean of glycemia during hospitalization was 10.65 ± 0.84 mmol/L in the no insulin infusion group and 7.69 ± 1.85 mmol/L in the insulin infusion group. At baseline, IL-6 and D-dimer levels were significantly higher in the hyperglycemic group than in the normoglycemic group (P < 0.001). Even though all patients were on standard treatment for COVID-19 infection, IL-6 and D-dimer levels persisted higher in patients with hyperglycemia during hospitalization. In a risk-adjusted Cox regression analysis, both patients with hyperglycemia and patients with diabetes had a higher risk of severe disease than those without diabetes and with normoglycemia. Cox regression analysis evidenced that patients with hyperglycemia treated with insulin infusion had a lower risk of severe disease than patients without insulin infusion. CONCLUSIONS: Insulin infusion may be an effective method for achieving glycemic targets and improving outcomes in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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