Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 3675, 2023 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272704

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has brought about dramatic restrictions to real-life social interactions and a shift towards more online social encounters. Positive social interactions have been highlighted as an important protective factor, with previous studies suggesting an involvement of the amygdala in the relationship between social embeddedness and well-being. The present study investigated the effect of the quality of real-life and online social interactions on mood, and explored whether this association is affected by an individual's amygdala activity. Sixty-two participants of a longitudinal study took part in a one-week ecological momentary assessment (EMA) during the first lockdown, reporting their momentary well-being and their engagement in real-life and online social interactions eight times per day (N ~ 3000 observations). Amygdala activity was assessed before the pandemic during an emotion-processing task. Mixed models were calculated to estimate the association between social interactions and well-being, including two-way interactions to test for the moderating effect of amygdala activity. We found a positive relationship between real-life interactions and momentary well-being. In contrast, online interactions had no effect on well-being. Moreover, positive real-life social interactions augmented this social affective benefit, especially in individuals with higher amygdala being more sensitive to the interaction quality. Our findings demonstrate a mood-lifting effect of positive real-life social interactions during the pandemic, which was dependent on amygdala activity before the pandemic. As no corresponding effect was found between online social interactions and well-being, it can be concluded that increased online social interactions may not compensate for the absence of real-life social interactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Longitudinal Studies , Social Interaction , Communicable Disease Control
2.
European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology ; 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2228067

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted people's daily lives. However, it remains unknown how the pandemic situation affects daily-life experiences of individuals with preexisting severe mental illnesses (SMI). In this real-life longitudinal study, the acute onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany did not cause the already low everyday well-being of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) or major depression (MDD) to decrease further. On the contrary, healthy participants' well-being, anxiety, social isolation, and mobility worsened, especially in healthy individuals at risk for mental disorder, but remained above the levels seen in patients. Despite being stressful for healthy individuals at risk for mental disorder, the COVID-19 pandemic had little additional influence on daily-life well-being in psychiatric patients with SMI. This highlights the need for preventive action and targeted support of this vulnerable population.

3.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol ; 69: 79-83, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2220685

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted people's daily lives. However, it remains unknown how the pandemic situation affects daily-life experiences of individuals with preexisting severe mental illnesses (SMI). In this real-life longitudinal study, the acute onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany did not cause the already low everyday well-being of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) or major depression (MDD) to decrease further. On the contrary, healthy participants' well-being, anxiety, social isolation, and mobility worsened, especially in healthy individuals at risk for mental disorder, but remained above the levels seen in patients. Despite being stressful for healthy individuals at risk for mental disorder, the COVID-19 pandemic had little additional influence on daily-life well-being in psychiatric patients with SMI. This highlights the need for preventive action and targeted support of this vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Schizophrenia , Humans , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Longitudinal Studies , Anxiety
4.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 971896, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199410

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic telemedicine became essential in maintaining diagnostic procedures and treatment in psychiatry. However, it is still an open question if telemedicine is a feasible treatment option for all groups of psychiatric patients alike. This prospective monocentric observational trial was conducted to assess the general applicability of telemedical treatment in a naturalistic psychiatric outpatient cohort and to identify groups of disorders and clusters of psychopathology that respond particularly well to telemedical treatment considering sociodemographic characteristics and patients' perspectives. Methods: Patients were recruited April 2020-April 2021 and asked to fill out the WHO-5 and the SCL-90R at baseline, after 4-6 and 8-12 weeks and a feedback-survey. Additionally, medical records, psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, and socio-demographic data were analyzed. Primary outcomes were well-being, psychopathology and functioning during treatment. Secondly, diagnostic groups and psychopathology linked to a superior treatment-response were determined with respect to patients' subjective experiences. Results: Out of 1.385 patients, 254-mostly with hyperkinetic (35.3%) and depressive disorders (24.6%)-took part. Well-being and SCL-90R total scores improved substantially (both p < 0.001). CGI and GAF scores were worse in depressed subjects (both p < 0.05). Improvement was mainly seen in depressed patients; chronic disorders experienced a decline in well-being. Sociodemographic characteristics could not explain this difference. Particularly female (r = 0.413) patients found telepsychiatry equivalent to conventional treatment. The more virtual sessions participants attended the more likely they were to find telepsychiatry equal to conventional treatment (r = 0.231). Conclusion: Telemedicine is an effective treatment for patients with depression under naturalistic conditions. Telemedical consultations are a simple and reliable way of monitoring symptom severity and directing treatment choices during the treatment of depressive disorders. Patients with depression benefited more from telemedical treatment compared to participants with chronic non-episodic psychiatric disorders. Future research needs to concentrate on improving telemedical treatment options suited for the latter conditions. Psychiatric telemedicine yielded overall high degrees of satisfaction among users.

5.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 118(10): 179, 2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383846
6.
Nervenarzt ; 93(8): 779-787, 2022 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the last 2 years of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, knowledge about the long-term effects of the disease, the so-called long COVID, has rapidly grown; however, many questions remain unanswered, especially regarding the causes of persistent symptoms and their prognosis. Cognitive disorders and sleep disturbances are among the most frequent complaints. Both are associated with severe suffering and significant impairment in everyday functioning. OBJECTIVE: What is known about the occurrence of cognitive disorders and sleep disturbances in long COVID? What are the influencing factors and what is known about the course over time and possible underlying mechanisms? What treatment options are available? MATERIAL AND METHOD: In a narrative review, the most important findings on cognitive disorders and sleep disturbances in long COVID are presented. An overview of cohort studies with data on the prevalence and influencing factors of both symptom complexes is given. Current knowledge and hypotheses on pathophysiological mechanisms are presented and an outlook on treatment approaches is given. RESULTS: About one in five of those affected report cognitive impairment more than 3 months after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and about one third report sleep disturbances. The latter comprise symptoms of insomnia as well as hypersomnia. Cognitive impairment and sleep disturbances occur in patients with all levels of initial disease severity. There are indications of an improvement of cognitive deficits over time but further longitudinal studies are needed. CONCLUSION: In addition to the prognosis, the underlying disease mechanisms are still insufficiently understood. Furthermore, there is a great need for research on the efficacy and specific effective factors of therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Cognition , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
7.
Transl Psychiatry ; 12(1): 28, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641939

ABSTRACT

Social integration is a major resilience factor for staying healthy. However, the COVID-19-pandemic led to unprecedented restrictions in social life. The consequences of these social lockdowns on momentary well-being are yet not fully understood. We investigated the affective benefit from social interactions in a longitudinal birth cohort. We used two real-time, real-life ecological momentary assessments once before and once during the initial lockdown of the pandemic (N = 70 participants; n~6800 observations) capturing the protective role of social interactions on well-being. Moreover, we used a multimethod approach to analyze ecological assessment data with individual risk and resilience factors, which are promising moderators in the relationship of social behavior, stress reactivity, and affective states (i.e., amygdala volume, neuroticism, polygenic risk for schizophrenia). Social contacts were linked to higher positive affect both during normal times and during the COVID-19-pandemic (beta coefficient = 0.1035), highlighting the beneficial role of social embedding. Interestingly, this relationship was differentially moderated by individual risk and resilience factors. In detail, participants with a larger left amygdala volume (beta coefficient = -0.0793) and higher neuroticism (beta coefficient = -0.0958) exhibited an affective benefit from more social interactions prior to the pandemic. This pattern changed during the pandemic with participants with smaller amygdala volumes and lower neurotic traits showing an affective gain during the pandemic. Moreover, participants with low genetic risk for schizophrenia showed an affective benefit (beta coefficient = -0.0528) from social interactions irrespective of the time point. Our results highlight the protective role of social integration on momentary well-being. Thereby, we offer new insights into how this relationship is differently affected by a person's neurobiology, personality, and genes under adverse circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurobiology , Birth Cohort , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Personality/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Interaction
8.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol ; 56: 13-23, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525787

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has confronted millions of people around the world with an unprecedented stressor, affecting physical and mental health. Accumulating evidence suggests that emotional and cognitive self-regulation is particularly needed to effectively cope with stress. Therefore, we investigated the predictive value of affective and inhibitory prefrontal control for stress burden during the COVID-19 crisis. Physical and mental health burden were assessed using an online survey, which was administered to 104 participants of an ongoing at-risk birth cohort during the first wave in April 2020. Two follow-ups were carried out during the pandemic, one capturing the relaxation during summer and the other the beginning of the second wave of the crisis. Prefrontal activity during emotion regulation and inhibitory control were assessed prior to the COVID-19 crisis. Increased inferior frontal gyrus activity during emotion regulation predicted lower stress burden at the beginning of the first and the second wave of the crisis. In contrast, inferior and middle frontal gyrus activity during inhibitory control predicted effective coping only during the summer, when infection rates decreased but stress burden remained unchanged. These findings remained significant when controlling for sociodemographic and clinical confounders such as stressful life events prior to the crisis or current psychopathology. We demonstrate that differential stress-buffering effects are predicted by the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation and cognitive regulation at different stages during the pandemic. These findings may inform future prevention strategies to foster stress coping in unforeseen situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Fortschritte der Neurologie, Psychiatrie ; 89(6):296-301, 2021.
Article in German | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1441578

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has a significant impact on mental health. On the one hand, fears about one's economic situation, own health and the health of others can lead to psychosocial consequences. On the other hand, social isolation through physical distancing can affect mental health. Finally, the infection itself can lead to psychiatric and neuropsychiatric symptoms as part of a systemic manifestation. In this paper, different mechanisms are presented, which can lead directly or indirectly to neuropsychological and psychopathological symptoms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) Abstract (German) Die COVID-19-Pandemie hat erhebliche Auswirkungen auf die psychische Gesundheit. Neben Angsten um die okonomische Situation, die eigene Gesundheit und die Gesundheit anderer Menschen konnen auch Masnahmen der Pandemiekontrolle wie Distanzierung und die dadurch bedingte Isolation psychosoziale Folgen haben. Schlieslich kann die Infektion selbst im Rahmen einer systemischen Manifestation zu psychiatrischen und neuropsychiatrischen Symptomen fuhren. In dieser Arbeit werden unterschiedliche Mechanismen dargestellt, die mittelbar oder unmittelbar zu neuropsychologischen und psychopathologischen Symptomen im Kontext der COVID-19-Pandemie fuhren konnen. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr ; 89(6): 296-301, 2021 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164977

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has a significant impact on mental health. On the one hand, fears about one's economic situation, own health and the health of others can lead to psychosocial consequences. On the other hand, social isolation through physical distancing can affect mental health. Finally, the infection itself can lead to psychiatric and neuropsychiatric symptoms as part of a systemic manifestation. In this paper, different mechanisms are presented, which can lead directly or indirectly to neuropsychological and psychopathological symptoms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Psychiatrische Praxis ; 47(7):361-369, 2020.
Article in German | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1089486

ABSTRACT

Objective: Analysis of associations between perceived daily life strain during the COVID-19-crisis and personality aspects with current psychological wellbeing in the general population and comparison of mental health indicators with those from a previous survey in 2018. Methods: Written survey in a random sample from the general population (n = 721) on Corona-related assessments, personality aspects and current mental health (WHO-5, PHQ-D). Results: Fear for the health of close persons, strain regarding going out restrictions, increased substance use and psychological risk- and resilience factors were independently related to current mental health. Extent and frequencies of mental health symptomatology did not differ between 2018 and 2020. Conclusion: This is a first study in Germany reporting results from a population-based random sample on determinants of mental health during the COVID-19-crisis and a comparison of mental health symptomatology with prepandemic data from the same population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) Abstract (German) Ziel der Studie: Zusammenhangsanalyse von wahrgenommenen Alltagsbelastungen wahrend der COVID-19-Krise und Personlichkeitsaspekten mit dem aktuellen psychischen Befinden in der Bevolkerung sowie Vergleich der psychischen Symptomatik mit einem Survey von 2018. Methodik: Zufallsstichprobe aus der Bevolkerung (n = 721), die zu coronabezogenen Einschatzungen, Personlichkeitsaspekten und aktuellem psychischen Befinden (WHO-5, PHQ-D) schriftlich befragt wurde. Ergebnisse: Angst um die Gesundheit Nahestehender, Belastungen durch Ausgangsbeschrankungen und vermehrter Substanzkonsum sowie psychische Risiko- und Resilienzfaktoren trugen im statistischen Modell unabhangig zur Vorhersage des psychischen Befindens bei. Auspragungen und Haufigkeiten psychischer Symptomatik unterschieden sich nicht zwischen 2018 und 2020. Schlussfolgerung: Dies ist eine erste Studie in Deutschland, die Ergebnisse aus einer bevolkerungsbezogenen Zufallsstichprobe zu Determinanten psychischen Befindens wahrend der COVID-19-Krise und einen Vergleich der psychischen Symptomatik mit einer prapandemischen Referenzstichprobe vorlegt. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Psychiatr Prax ; 47(7): 361-369, 2020 Oct.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726955

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Analysis of associations between perceived daily life strain during the COVID-19-crisis and personality aspects with current psychological wellbeing in the general population and comparison of mental health indicators with those from a previous survey in 2018. METHODS: Written survey in a random sample from the general population (n = 721) on Corona-related assessments, personality aspects and current mental health (WHO-5, PHQ-D). RESULTS: Fear for the health of close persons, strain regarding going out restrictions, increased substance use and psychological risk- and resilience factors were independently related to current mental health. Extent and frequencies of mental health symptomatology did not differ between 2018 and 2020. CONCLUSION: This is a first study in Germany reporting results from a population-based random sample on determinants of mental health during the COVID-19-crisis and a comparison of mental health symptomatology with prepandemic data from the same population.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 271(2): 377-379, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591903

ABSTRACT

During the rapid rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, a reduction of the numbers of patients presenting to emergency departments has been observed. We present an early study from a German psychiatric hospital to assess the dynamics of mental health emergency service utilization rates during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our results show that the numbers of emergency presentations decreased, and a positive correlation between these numbers and mobility of the general public suggests an impact of extended measures of social distancing. This finding underscores the necessity of raising and sustaining awareness regarding the threat to mental health in the context of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/psychology , Switzerland
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL