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1.
Economies ; 10(8):184, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023274

ABSTRACT

The digital economy has risen dramatically in the global environment, and many developing countries, including African countries, have seen a spike in digital activity over recent years. The digital economy’s growth has resulted in an increase in digital financial services (DFS) in Africa and other developing regions. Since many African countries are under pressure to raise domestic revenue, taxing the digital economy has become a viable option. As a result, this study attempted to respond to the following questions: first, what is the link between DFS growth and digital inclusion in African countries? Second, what justifies the imposition of DFS taxes in Africa? Third, what are the potential consequences of DFS taxes in African countries? Using secondary data from the literature review and document analysis, a systematic technique for assessing or evaluating printed and electronic documents, and computer-based and internet-transmitted material, the study discovered that digital financial inclusion is driving financial inclusion on the African continent. The study also found that, despite several negative consequences associated with the growth of the digital economy, most African economic activities are informal and are being aided by various digital financial services. Therefore, it is equally crucial that when adopting digital finance taxes, care is taken to avoid excluding low-income earners from the financial sector and to take note of the usage, affordability, and distortive implications of taxation.

2.
Education Sciences ; 12(7):464, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1917393

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has left an unmistakable impression on the world stage. It has altered the global socio-economic landscape, forcing individuals to adapt and embrace new ways of doing business, as well as new ways of life. One of the most significant effects of the pandemic was to hasten the adoption of digital technologies by many areas of the global economy. Campus closures were observed in the higher education sector, putting an end to long-standing face-to-face teaching and learning. This necessitated the most rapid paradigm shift ever seen in this industry to continue educating and learning. An abrupt change to online learning, which is primarily reliant on digital technologies, occurred. As a result, the purpose of this article is to investigate and identify ten critical digital transformation lessons from COVID-19 for South African higher education institutions. Secondary data gathered from the literature research were used to meet the study's goal. The study concluded by laying out the most important digital transformation lessons for South Africa, including the notion that the country should strive to build digital capabilities because digital technology gaps remain wide, among other things.

3.
Journal of African Education ; 2(2):15-15–42, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1812088

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to investigate the opportunities and challenges of introducing blended learning in the education sector in South Africa post the COVID-19 disturbances. The research applied a literature review approach using unobtrusive research methods like conceptual and documentary analysis of authoritative documents. The study discovered that the COVID-19 pandemic created opportunities for the introduction of blended learning postCOVID-19 which can help to expand access to education in South Africa where access was limited by space, especially at the tertiary level. However, the study discovered that introducing blended learning is associated with challenges related to high levels of inequality, massive digital divide, resource constraints and skills shortages. Therefore, the study recommends that for blended learning to be successful it is important to ensure that there is a policy platform for addressing challenges related to inequality, skills deficit, and the massive digital divide. This means that policies that are geared towards addressing all the challenges above should be prioritized if blended learning is to be effective in South Africa.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674642

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic came with disruptions in every aspect of human existence, with all the sectors of the economies of the world affected greatly. In the health sector, the pandemic halted and reversed progress in health and subsequently shortened life expectancy, especially in developing and underdeveloped nations. On the other hand, machine learning and artificial intelligence contributed a great deal to the handling of the pandemic globally. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the role played by artificial intelligence and machine learning in addressing the dangers posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as extrapolate the lessons on the fourth industrial revolution and sustainable development goals. Using qualitative content analysis, the results indicated that artificial intelligence and machine learning played an important role in the response to the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and various digital communication tools through telehealth performed meaningful roles in scaling customer communications, provided a platform for understanding how COVID-19 spreads, and sped up research and treatment of COVID-19, among other notable achievements. The lessons we draw from this is that, despite the disruptions and the rise in the number of unintended consequences of technology in the fourth industrial revolution, the role played by artificial intelligence and machine learning motivates us to conclude that governments must build trust in these technologies, to address health problems going forward, to ensure that the sustainable development goals related to good health and wellbeing are achieved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Artificial Intelligence , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sustainable Development
5.
African Renaissance ; 18(1):247-247–269, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1595983

ABSTRACT

This study sought to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals with a direct focus on poverty (goal one), taking Zimbabwe as a case study and comparing it to South Africa. The neoclassical economic theory of poverty was used in the analysis. The study used a literature review approach where document and conceptual analyses were conducted. The information gathered from the secondary sources of data which include several peer-reviewed journals on the neoclassical economics, reports and even newspaper articles indicated that poverty would rise because of the COVID-19 pandemic in Zimbabwe and South Africa. This will be more prevalent among the low-income earners and those who are already in the poverty bracket. The conclusion is that the rise in poverty will negatively impact the attainment of SDGs. Therefore, governments in various countries, especially in developing nations, should avail grants for the poor, the low-income earners whose income has been disrupted by the pandemic and to come up with strong mechanisms to bail out businesses, especially small businesses who have challenges to cope with the crisis.

6.
Education Sciences ; 10(7):180, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-651249

ABSTRACT

The study sought to assess the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic in motivating digital transformation in the education sector in South Africa. The study was premised on the fact that learning in South Africa and the rest of the world came to a standstill due to the lockdown necessitated by COVID-19. To assess the impact, the study tracked the rate at which the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) tools were used by various institutions during the COVID-19 lockdown. Data were obtained from secondary sources. The findings are that, in South Africa, during the lockdown, a variety of 4IR tools were unleashed from primary education to higher and tertiary education where educational activities switched to remote (online) learning. These observations reflect that South Africa generally has some pockets of excellence to drive the education sector into the 4IR, which has the potential to increase access. Access to education, particularly at a higher education level, has always been a challenge due to a limited number of spaces available. Much as this pandemic has brought with it massive human suffering across the globe, it has presented an opportunity to assess successes and failures of deployed technologies, costs associated with them, and scaling these technologies to improve access.

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