Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Mol Ther ; 30(5): 1952-1965, 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783847

ABSTRACT

For coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), effective and well-understood treatment options are still scarce. Since vaccine efficacy is challenged by novel variants, short-lasting immunity, and vaccine hesitancy, understanding and optimizing therapeutic options remains essential. We aimed at better understanding the effects of two standard-of-care drugs, dexamethasone and anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies, on infection and host responses. By using two COVID-19 hamster models, pulmonary immune responses were analyzed to characterize effects of single or combinatorial treatments. Pulmonary viral burden was reduced by anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody treatment and unaltered or increased by dexamethasone alone. Dexamethasone exhibited strong anti-inflammatory effects and prevented fulminant disease in a severe disease model. Combination therapy showed additive benefits with both anti-viral and anti-inflammatory potency. Bulk and single-cell transcriptomic analyses confirmed dampened inflammatory cell recruitment into lungs upon dexamethasone treatment and identified a specifically responsive subpopulation of neutrophils, thereby indicating a potential mechanism of action. Our analyses confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of dexamethasone and suggest possible mechanisms, validate anti-viral effects of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody treatment, and reveal synergistic effects of a combination therapy, thus informing more effective COVID-19 therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cricetinae , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome
2.
Blood Adv ; 6(3): 1074-1087, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551193

ABSTRACT

The high incidence of thrombotic events suggests a possible role of the contact system pathway in COVID-19 pathology. In this study, we determined the altered levels of factor XII (FXII) and its activation products in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in comparison with patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome related to the influenza virus (acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]-influenza). Compatible with those data, we found rapid consumption of FXII in COVID-19 but not in ARDS-influenza plasma. Interestingly, the lag phase in fibrin formation, triggered by the FXII activator kaolin, was not prolonged in COVID-19, as opposed to that in ARDS-influenza. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that increased FXII activation rate, in conjunction with elevated fibrinogen levels, triggered formation of fibrinolysis-resistant, compact clots with thin fibers and small pores in COVID-19. Accordingly, clot lysis was markedly impaired in COVID-19 as opposed to that in ARDS-influenza. Dysregulated fibrinolytic system, as evidenced by elevated levels of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, tissue-plasminogen activator, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in COVID-19 potentiated this effect. Analysis of lung tissue sections revealed widespread extra- and intravascular compact fibrin deposits in patients with COVID-19. A compact fibrin network structure and dysregulated fibrinolysis may collectively contribute to a high incidence of thrombotic events in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Fibrin , Fibrinolysis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology
3.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323124

ABSTRACT

Activation of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels can disrupt endothelial barrier function, as their mediated Ca2+ influx activates the CaM (calmodulin)/MLCK (myosin light chain kinase)-signaling pathway, and thereby rearranges the cytoskeleton, increases endothelial permeability and thus can facilitate activation of inflammatory cells and formation of pulmonary edema. Interestingly, TRP channel subunits can build heterotetramers, whereas heteromeric TRPC1/4, TRPC3/6 and TRPV1/4 are expressed in the lung endothelium and could be targeted as a protective strategy to reduce endothelial permeability in pulmonary inflammation. An update on TRP heteromers and their role in lung inflammation will be provided with this review.


Subject(s)
Pneumonia/metabolism , Protein Multimerization , Transient Receptor Potential Channels/metabolism , Animals , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Ion Channel Gating , Models, Biological , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/physiopathology
4.
The FASEB Journal ; 35(S1), 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1233934

ABSTRACT

Study objective Endothelial dysfunction and increased microvascular permeability are hallmarks of severe COVID-19. At present, the extent of endothelial barrier failure and its underlying mechanisms in COVID?19 remain unclear. We hypothesized that endothelial leak results from bioactive mediators released in COVID-19 rather than direct endothelial infection and can thus be recapitulated ex vivo by treating endothelial cells with patient plasma, thus providing a personalized screening platform for barrier-protective interventions in COVID-19. Methods Citrate plasma was sampled as part of the Pa-COVID-19 cohort study (ethics approval EA2/066/20) in patients with moderate (hospitalized, no invasive ventilation;WHO severity score: 3-4) and severe (high flow O2 or intubated and mechanically ventilated;WHO severity score: 5-7) COVID?19. Plasma samples were diluted to 10% (v/v) in cell culture medium without FCS and tested for their ability to disrupt barrier integrity of primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) monolayers by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), immunofluorescence for endothelial VE-cadherin and F-actin, and real-time Ca2+ imaging. Plasma from healthy donors served as control. Results COVID-19 plasma was virus-free but caused endothelial barrier disruption as measured by ECIS and gap formation in HPMEC monolayers. The extent of barrier disruption increased with disease severity but varied considerably between endothelial cells from different microvascular beds (lung/heart >> skin). The TRPV4-antagonist HC-067047 prevented the endothelial Ca2+ response to COVID-19 plasma and protected endothelial barrier integrity in lung microvascular cells. Conclusion Here, we identify TRPV4 as critical regulator of microvascular permeability in COVID?19. Targeting TRPV4-mediated endothelial barrier failure may present a promising adjunctive therapy in COVID-19.

6.
Cell Syst ; 11(1): 11-24.e4, 2020 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459007

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global challenge, and point-of-care diagnostic classifiers are urgently required. Here, we present a platform for ultra-high-throughput serum and plasma proteomics that builds on ISO13485 standardization to facilitate simple implementation in regulated clinical laboratories. Our low-cost workflow handles up to 180 samples per day, enables high precision quantification, and reduces batch effects for large-scale and longitudinal studies. We use our platform on samples collected from a cohort of early hospitalized cases of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and identify 27 potential biomarkers that are differentially expressed depending on the WHO severity grade of COVID-19. They include complement factors, the coagulation system, inflammation modulators, and pro-inflammatory factors upstream and downstream of interleukin 6. All protocols and software for implementing our approach are freely available. In total, this work supports the development of routine proteomic assays to aid clinical decision making and generate hypotheses about potential COVID-19 therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Blood Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Proteomics/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/classification , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL