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2.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69(12): e29985, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2034946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in 2020 evolved into a global pandemic, and COVID-19 vaccines became rapidly available, including for pediatric patients. However, questions emerged that challenged vaccine acceptance and use. We aimed to answer these questions and give recommendations applicable for use in pediatric patients with cancer by healthcare professionals and the public. METHODS: A 12-member global COVID-19 Vaccine in Pediatric Oncology Working Group made up of physicians and nurses from all world regions met weekly from March to July 2021. We used a modified Delphi method to select the top questions. The Working Group, in four-member subgroups, answered assigned questions by providing brief recommendations, followed by a discussion of the rationale for each answer. All Working Group members voted on each recommendation using a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being complete agreement. A "pass" recommendation corresponded to an agreement ≥7.5. RESULTS: We selected 15 questions from 173 suggested questions. Based on existing published information, we generated answers for each question as recommendations. The overall average agreement for the 24 recommendations was 9.5 (95% CI 9.4-9.6). CONCLUSION: Top COVID-19 vaccine-related questions could be answered using available information. Reports on COVID-19 vaccination and related topics have been published at record speed, aided by available technology and the priority imposed by the pandemic; however, all efforts were made to incorporate emerging information throughout our project. Recommendations will be periodically updated on a dedicated website.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Child , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination , Neoplasms/therapy
3.
Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; : 1-11, 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956495

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to understand global caregiver concerns about SARS-CoV-2 vaccination for children with cancer and to provide healthcare providers with guidance to support parental decision-making. A co-designed cross-sectional mixed-methods survey was distributed to primary caregivers of children with cancer globally between April and May 2021 via several media. Caregivers were asked to rate the importance of vaccine-related questions and the median scores were ranked. Principal Component Analysis was conducted to identify underlying dimensions of caregiver concerns by World Bank income groups. Content analysis of free-text responses was conducted and triangulated with the quantitative findings. 627 caregivers from 22 countries responded to the survey with 5.3% (n = 67) responses from low-and-middle-income countries (LMIC). 184 caregivers (29%) provided free-text responses. Side effects and vaccine safety were caregivers' primary concerns in all countries. Questions related to logistics were of concern for caregivers in LMIC. A small minority of caregivers (n = 17) did not consider the survey questions important; free-text analysis identified these parents as vaccine hesitant, some of them quoting safety and side effects as main reasons for hesitancy. Healthcare providers and other community organizations globally need to provide tailored information about vaccine safety and effectiveness in pediatric oncology settings. Importantly, continued efforts are imperative to reduce global inequities in logistical access to vaccines, particularly in LMIC.

4.
Interface Focus ; 12(2): 20210079, 2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713825

ABSTRACT

Responses to the early (February-July 2020) COVID-19 pandemic varied widely, globally. Reasons for this are multiple but likely relate to the healthcare and financial resources then available, and the degree of trust in, and economic support provided by, national governments. Cultural factors also affected how different populations reacted to the various pandemic restrictions, like masking, social distancing and self-isolation or self-quarantine. The degree of compliance with these measures depended on how much individuals valued their needs and liberties over those of their society. Thus, several themes may be relevant when comparing pandemic responses across different regions. East and Southeast Asian populations tended to be more collectivist and self-sacrificing, responding quickly to early signs of the pandemic and readily complied with most restrictions to control its spread. Australasian, Eastern European, Scandinavian, some Middle Eastern, African and South American countries also responded promptly by imposing restrictions of varying severity, due to concerns for their wider society, including for some, the fragility of their healthcare systems. Western European and North American countries, with well-resourced healthcare systems, initially reacted more slowly, partly in an effort to maintain their economies but also to delay imposing pandemic restrictions that limited the personal freedoms of their citizens.

5.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 27(2 SUPPL):769-770, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1496075

ABSTRACT

Background: Information about humoral and cellular responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) is scarce. Objective: To determine humoral and cellular responses after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in PwMS and anti-CD20-treated patients with other AID. Methods: Ongoing prospective study performed in two Catalan MS centres from February 2021. Unvaccinated adult pwMS and other anti-CD20-treated AID were recruited. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Whole blood samples were obtained before and 30-90 days after vaccination. The humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 was qualitatively and quantitatively measured before and after vaccination with commercial chemiluminescence immunoassays targeting SARS-CoV-2 antibodies against spike (TrimericS, IgG anti-S) and nucleocasid proteins (Elecsys, Ig anti-N). In 150 selected patients according to diseasemodifying therapy (DMT), the SARS-CoV-2 specific T-cell response was assessed after vaccination by a whole blood Interferon-Gamma Release immuno Assay (IGRA) that uses two Qiagen proprietary mixes of SARS-CoV-2 S protein (Ag.1 and Ag.2) selected to activate both CD4 and CD8 T cells. Results: 457 patients have been enrolled in the study (anti-CD20 therapy n=164, S1P DMTs n=37, natalizumab n=32, cladribine n=29, alemtuzumab n=31, other DMTs n=129, no DMT n=35). Participants characteristics are: mean age 48.1 years (SD 12.0), 69% female, 422 pwMS (29.4% progressive forms) and 35 with other AID, disease duration 13.9 years (IQR 14.1), median EDSS 3.0 (IQR 3.0). 450 have been fully vaccinated (94.2% mRNA vaccine). Pre-vaccination samples were collected 0.33 days (SD 0.5) before the first vaccine dose of which 12 (3.35%) had positive anti S/N immunoglobulin (Ig). As of June 30th, 42 post-vaccination samples have been obtained (1.3 months [SD 0.42] after the 2nd vaccination dose). Positive IgG rates were 44.8% (n=13/29) for CD20s, 100% (8/8) for other DMTs and 100% (4/4) for no DMT. No anti-N Ig were detected. Media titres of anti-S IgG were lower in anti-CD20-treated patients (7.8 [IQR 50.1]) compared to untreated patients (800 [0], p<0.01) or other DMTs (755 [228], p<0.01). Conclusions: Initial results of the study suggest blunted anti-S/N Ig response under anti-CD20 therapy. Knowledge of the cellular response in these patients will be crucial. Data from the cellular study and the completed humoral study will be presented at the meeting.

6.
Lancet Oncol ; 22(10): 1416-1426, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that children and adolescents with COVID-19 generally have mild disease. Children and adolescents with cancer, however, can have severe disease when infected with respiratory viruses. In this study, we aimed to understand the clinical course and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and adolescents with cancer. METHODS: We did a cohort study with data from 131 institutions in 45 countries. We created the Global Registry of COVID-19 in Childhood Cancer to capture de-identified data pertaining to laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections in children and adolescents (<19 years) with cancer or having received a haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. There were no centre-specific exclusion criteria. The registry was disseminated through professional networks through email and conferences and health-care providers were invited to submit all qualifying cases. Data for demographics, oncological diagnosis, clinical course, and cancer therapy details were collected. Primary outcomes were disease severity and modification to cancer-directed therapy. The registry remains open to data collection. FINDINGS: Of 1520 submitted episodes, 1500 patients were included in the study between April 15, 2020, and Feb 1, 2021. 1319 patients had complete 30-day follow-up. 259 (19·9%) of 1301 patients had a severe or critical infection, and 50 (3·8%) of 1319 died with the cause attributed to COVID-19 infection. Modifications to cancer-directed therapy occurred in 609 (55·8%) of 1092 patients receiving active oncological treatment. Multivariable analysis revealed several factors associated with severe or critical illness, including World Bank low-income or lower-middle-income (odds ratio [OR] 5·8 [95% CI 3·8-8·8]; p<0·0001) and upper-middle-income (1·6 [1·2-2·2]; p=0·0024) country status; age 15-18 years (1·6 [1·1-2·2]; p=0·013); absolute lymphocyte count of 300 or less cells per mm3 (2·5 [1·8-3·4]; p<0·0001), absolute neutrophil count of 500 or less cells per mm3 (1·8 [1·3-2·4]; p=0·0001), and intensive treatment (1·8 [1·3-2·3]; p=0·0005). Factors associated with treatment modification included upper-middle-income country status (OR 0·5 [95% CI 0·3-0·7]; p=0·0004), primary diagnosis of other haematological malignancies (0·5 [0·3-0·8]; p=0·0088), the presence of one of more COVID-19 symptoms at the time of presentation (1·8 [1·3-2·4]; p=0·0002), and the presence of one or more comorbidities (1·6 [1·1-2·3]; p=0·020). INTERPRETATION: In this global cohort of children and adolescents with cancer and COVID-19, severe and critical illness occurred in one fifth of patients and deaths occurred in a higher proportion than is reported in the literature in the general paediatric population. Additionally, we found that variables associated with treatment modification were not the same as those associated with greater disease severity. These data could inform clinical practice guidelines and raise awareness globally that children and adolescents with cancer are at high-risk of developing severe COVID-19 illness. FUNDING: American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities and the National Cancer Institute.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adolescent , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Neoplasms/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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