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1.
World J Radiol ; 13(9): 294-306, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463948

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is the main manifestation of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Chest computed tomography is recommended for the initial evaluation of the disease; this technique can also be helpful to monitor the disease progression and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. AIM: To review the currently available literature regarding the radiological follow-up of COVID-19-related lung alterations using the computed tomography scan, to describe the evidence about the dynamic evolution of COVID-19 pneumonia and verify the potential usefulness of the radiological follow-up. METHODS: We used pertinent keywords on PubMed to select relevant studies; the articles we considered were published until October 30, 2020. Through this selection, 69 studies were identified, and 16 were finally included in the review. RESULTS: Summarizing the included works' findings, we identified well-defined stages in the short follow-up time frame. A radiographic deterioration reaching a peak roughly within the first 2 wk; after the peak, an absorption process and repairing signs are observed. At later radiological follow-up, with the limitation of little evidence available, the lesions usually did not recover completely. CONCLUSION: Following computed tomography scan evolution over time could help physicians better understand the clinical impact of COVID-19 pneumonia and manage the possible sequelae; a longer follow-up is advisable to verify the complete resolution or the presence of long-term damage.

2.
World J Radiol ; 13(8): 243-257, 2021 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the several radiological features shared by coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia and other infective or non-infective diseases with lung involvement, the differential diagnosis is often tricky, and no unequivocal tool exists to help the radiologist in the proper diagnosis. Computed tomography is considered the gold standard in detecting pulmonary illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. AIM: To conduct a systematic review including the available studies evaluating computed tomography similarities and discrepancies between coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia and other pulmonary illness, then providing a discussion focus on cancer patients. METHODS: Using pertinent keywords, we performed a systematic review using PubMed to select relevant studies published until October 30, 2020. RESULTS: Of the identified 133 studies, 18 were eligible and included in this review. CONCLUSION: Ground-glass opacity and consolidations are the most common computed tomography lesions in coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia and other respiratory diseases. Only two studies included cancer patients, and the differential diagnosis with early lung cancer and radiation pneumonitis was performed. A single lesion associated with pleural effusion and lymphadenopathies in lung cancer and the onset of the lesions in the radiation field in the case of radiation pneumonitis allowed the differential diagnosis. Nevertheless, the studies were heterogeneous, and the type and prevalence of lesions, distributions, morphology, evolution, and additional signs, together with epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings, are crucial to help in the differential diagnosis.

3.
Clin Med Insights Oncol ; 15: 11795549211043427, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405284

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), an acute respiratory syndrome caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), has rapidly spread worldwide, significantly affecting the outcome of a highly vulnerable group such as cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical impact of COVID-19 infection on outcome and oncologic treatment of cancer patients. PATIENT AND METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled cancer patients with laboratory and/or radiologic confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, admitted to our center from February to April 2020. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the clinical data and univariate analyses were performed to investigate the impact of anticancer treatment modifications due to COVID-19 outbreak on the short-term overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Among 61 patients enrolled, 49 (80%) were undergoing anticancer treatment and 41 (67%) had metastatic disease. Most patients were men; median age was 68 years. Median OS was 46.6 days (40% of deaths occurred within 20 days from COVID-19 diagnosis). Among 59 patients with available data on therapeutic course, 46 experienced consequences on their anticancer treatment schedule. Interruption or a starting failure of the oncologic therapy correlated with significant shorter OS. Anticancer treatment delays did not negatively affect the OS. Lymphocytopenia development after COVID was significantly associated with worst outcome. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 diagnosis in cancer patients may affect their short-term OS, especially in case of interruption/starting failure of cancer therapy. Maintaining/delaying cancer therapy seems not to influence the outcome in selected patients with recent COVID-19 diagnosis.

4.
Eur Respir J ; 58(3)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403207

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: For the management of patients referred to respiratory triage during the early stages of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, either chest radiography or computed tomography (CT) were used as first-line diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to compare the impact on the triage, diagnosis and prognosis of patients with suspected COVID-19 when clinical decisions are derived from reconstructed chest radiography or from CT. METHODS: We reconstructed chest radiographs from high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. Five clinical observers independently reviewed clinical charts of 300 subjects with suspected COVID-19 pneumonia, integrated with either a reconstructed chest radiography or HRCT report in two consecutive blinded and randomised sessions: clinical decisions were recorded for each session. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and prognostic value were compared between reconstructed chest radiography and HRCT. The best radiological integration was also examined to develop an optimised respiratory triage algorithm. RESULTS: Interobserver agreement was fair (Kendall's W=0.365, p<0.001) by the reconstructed chest radiography-based protocol and good (Kendall's W=0.654, p<0.001) by the CT-based protocol. NPV assisted by reconstructed chest radiography (31.4%) was lower than that of HRCT (77.9%). In case of indeterminate or typical radiological appearance for COVID-19 pneumonia, extent of disease on reconstructed chest radiography or HRCT were the only two imaging variables that were similarly linked to mortality by adjusted multivariable models CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that clinical triage is safely assisted by chest radiography. An integrated algorithm using first-line chest radiography and contingent use of HRCT can help optimise management and prognostication of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiography , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Br J Radiol ; 94(1118): 20200716, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038510

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Ground-glass opacity and consolidation are recognized typical features of Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pneumonia on Chest CT, yet ancillary findings have not been fully described. We aimed to describe ancillary findings of COVID-19 pneumonia on CT, to define their prevalence, and investigate their association with clinical data. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our CT chest cases with coupled reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). Patients with negative rt-PCR or without admission chest CT were excluded. Ancillary findings included: vessel enlargement, subpleural curvilinear lines, dependent subpleural atelectasis, centrilobular solid nodules, pleural and/or pericardial effusions, enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. Continuous data were expressed as median and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) and tested by Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Ancillary findings were represented by 106/252 (42.1%, 36.1 to 48.2) vessel enlargement, 50/252 (19.8%, 15.4 to 25.2) subpleural curvilinear lines, 26/252 (10.1%, 7.1 to 14.7) dependent subpleural atelectasis, 15/252 (5.9%, 3.6 to 9.6) pleural effusion, 15/252 (5.9%, 3.6 to 9.6) mediastinal lymph nodes enlargement, 13/252 (5.2%, 3 to 8.6) centrilobular solid nodules, and 6/252 (2.4%, 1.1 to 5.1) pericardial effusion. Air space disease was more extensive in patients with vessel enlargement or centrilobular solid nodules (p < 0.001). Vessel enlargement was associated with longer history of fever (p = 0.035) and lower admission oxygen saturation (p = 0.014); dependent subpleural atelectasis with lower oxygen saturation (p < 0.001) and higher respiratory rate (p < 0.001); mediastinal lymph nodes with shorter history of cough (p = 0.046); centrilobular solid nodules with lower prevalence of cough (p = 0.023), lower oxygen saturation (p < 0.001), and higher respiratory rate (p = 0.032), and pericardial effusion with shorter history of cough (p = 0.015). Ancillary findings associated with longer hospital stay were subpleural curvilinear lines (p = 0.02), whereas centrilobular solid nodules were associated with higher rate of intensive care unit admission (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Typical high-resolution CT findings of COVID-19 pneumonia are frequently associated with ancillary findings that variably associate with disease extent, clinical parameters, and disease severity. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: Ancillary findings might reflect the broad range of heterogeneous mechanisms in severe acute respiratory syndrome from viral pneumonia, and potentially help disease phenotyping.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Incidental Findings , Lung/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Dilatation, Pathologic/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Lung/blood supply , Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Multidetector Computed Tomography/methods , Observer Variation , Pleural Effusion/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Artery/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Veins/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies
8.
Tumori ; 107(5): 446-451, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-920972

ABSTRACT

There are no robust data on the real onset of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and spread in the prepandemic period worldwide. We investigated the presence of SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific antibodies in blood samples of 959 asymptomatic individuals enrolled in a prospective lung cancer screening trial between September 2019 and March 2020 to track the date of onset, frequency, and temporal and geographic variations across the Italian regions. SARS-CoV-2 RBD-specific antibodies were detected in 111 of 959 (11.6%) individuals, starting from September 2019 (14%), with a cluster of positive cases (>30%) in the second week of February 2020 and the highest number (53.2%) in Lombardy. This study shows an unexpected very early circulation of SARS-CoV-2 among asymptomatic individuals in Italy several months before the first patient was identified, and clarifies the onset and spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Finding SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in asymptomatic people before the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy may reshape the history of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Asymptomatic Infections , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
9.
Emerg Radiol ; 27(6): 701-710, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893291

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To test the association between death and both qualitative and quantitative CT parameters obtained visually and by software in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) early outbreak. METHODS: The study analyzed retrospectively patients underwent chest CT at hospital admission for COVID-19 pneumonia suspicion, between February 21 and March 6, 2020. CT was performed in case of hypoxemia or moderate-to-severe dyspnea. CT scans were analyzed for quantitative and qualitative features obtained visually and by software. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis examined the association between variables and overall survival (OS). Three models were built for stratification of mortality risk: clinical, clinical/visual CT evaluation, and clinical/software-based CT assessment. AUC for each model was used to assess performance in predicting death. RESULTS: The study included 248 patients (70% males, median age 68 years). Death occurred in 78/248 (32%) patients. Visual pneumonia extent > 40% (HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.2-3.85, P = 0.01), %high attenuation area - 700 HU > 35% (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.2-3.94, P = 0.01), exudative consolidations (HR 2.85-2.93, 95% CI 1.61-5.05/1.66-5.16, P < 0.001), visual CAC score > 1 (HR 2.76-3.32, 95% CI 1.4-5.45/1.71-6.46, P < 0.01/P < 0.001), and CT classified as COVID-19 and other disease (HR 1.92-2.03, 95% CI 1.01-3.67/1.06-3.9, P = 0.04/P = 0.03) were significantly associated with shorter OS. Models including CT parameters (AUC 0.911-0.913, 95% CI 0.873-0.95/0.875-0.952) were better predictors of death as compared to clinical model (AUC 0.869, 95% CI 0.816-0.922; P = 0.04 for both models). CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19 patients, qualitative and quantitative chest CT parameters obtained visually or by software are predictors of mortality. Predictive models including CT metrics were better predictors of death in comparison to clinical model.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Software
10.
Eur Radiol ; 31(4): 1999-2012, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841709

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the inter-rater agreement of chest X-ray (CXR) findings in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to determine the value of initial CXR along with demographic, clinical, and laboratory data at emergency department (ED) presentation for predicting mortality and the need for ventilatory support. METHODS: A total of 340 COVID-19 patients who underwent CXR in the ED setting (March 1-13, 2020) were retrospectively included. Two reviewers independently assessed CXR abnormalities, including ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and consolidation. Two scoring systems (Brixia score and percentage of lung involvement) were applied. Inter-rater agreement was assessed by weighted Cohen's kappa (κ) or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Predictors of death and respiratory support were identified by logistic or Poisson regression. RESULTS: GGO admixed with consolidation (n = 235, 69%) was the most common CXR finding. The inter-rater agreement was almost perfect for type of parenchymal opacity (κ = 0.90), Brixia score (ICC = 0.91), and percentage of lung involvement (ICC = 0.95). The Brixia score (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.34; p = 0.003), age (OR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.22; p < 0.001), PaO2/FiO2 ratio (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.98, 1; p = 0.002), and cardiovascular diseases (OR: 3.21; 95% CI: 1.28, 8.39; p = 0.014) predicted death. Percentage of lung involvement (OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.03; p = 0.001) and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.00; p < 0.001) were significant predictors of the need for ventilatory support. CONCLUSIONS: CXR is a reproducible tool for assessing COVID-19 and integrates with patient history, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and SpO2 values to early predict mortality and the need for ventilatory support. KEY POINTS: • Chest X-ray is a reproducible tool for assessing COVID-19 pneumonia. • The Brixia score and percentage of lung involvement on chest X-ray integrate with patient history, PaO2/FIO2 ratio, and SpO2 values to early predict mortality and the need for ventilatory support in COVID-19 patients presenting to the emergency department.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Lung , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , X-Rays
11.
Eur J Radiol ; 133: 109344, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-837134

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Chest computed tomography (CT) is considered a reliable imaging tool for COVID-19 pneumonia diagnosis, while lung ultrasound (LUS) has emerged as a potential alternative to characterize lung involvement. The aim of the study was to compare diagnostic performance of admission chest CT and LUS for the diagnosis of COVID-19. METHODS: We included patients admitted to emergency department between February 21-March 6, 2020 (high prevalence group, HP) and between March 30-April 13, 2020 (moderate prevalence group, MP) undergoing LUS and chest CT within 12 h. Chest CT was considered positive in case of "indeterminate"/"typical" pattern for COVID-19 by RSNA classification system. At LUS, thickened pleural line with ≥ three B-lines at least in one zone of the 12 explored was considered positive. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and AUC were calculated for CT and LUS against real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and serology as reference standard. RESULTS: The study included 486 patients (males 61 %; median age, 70 years): 247 patients in HP (COVID-19 prevalence 94 %) and 239 patients in MP (COVID-19 prevalence 45 %). In HP and MP respectively, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 90-95 %, 43-69 %, 96-72 %, 20-95 % for CT and 94-93 %, 7-31 %, 94-52 %, 7-83 % for LUS. CT demonstrated better performance than LUS in diagnosis of COVID-19, both in HP (AUC 0.75 vs 0.51; P < 0.001) and MP (AUC 0.85 vs 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Admission chest CT shows better performance than LUS for COVID-19 diagnosis, at varying disease prevalence. LUS is highly sensitive, but not specific for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ultrasonography/methods , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(1): 99-102, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753271

ABSTRACT

We present three patients affected by pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma, metastatic esophageal cancer and advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma, who incurred in coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) infection during the early phase of epidemic wave in Italy. All patients presented with fever. Social contact with subject positive for COVID-19 was declared in only one of the three cases. In all cases, laboratory findings showed lymphopenia and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). Chest x-ray and computed tomography showed bilateral ground-glass opacities, shadowing, interstitial abnormalities, and "crazy paving" pattern which evolved with superimposition of consolidations in one patient. All patients received antiviral therapy based on ritonavir and lopinavir, associated with hydroxychloroquine. Despite treatment, two patients with advanced cancers died after 39 and 17 days of hospitalization, while the patient with lung cancer was dismissed at home, in good conditions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/complications , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Therapy, Combination , Esophageal Neoplasms/complications , Esophageal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Esophageal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/complications , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/diagnosis , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
13.
Respiration ; 99(7): 617-624, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound (LUS) is an accurate, safe, and cheap tool assisting in the diagnosis of several acute respiratory diseases. The diagnostic value of LUS in the workup of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in the hospital setting is still uncertain. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this observational study was to explore correlations of the LUS appearance of COVID-19-related pneumonia with CT findings. METHODS: Twenty-six patients (14 males, age 64 ± 16 years) urgently hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia, who underwent chest CT and bedside LUS on the day of admission, were enrolled in this observational study. CT images were reviewed by expert chest radiologists, who calculated a visual CT score based on extension and distribution of ground-glass opacities and consolidations. LUS was performed by clinicians with certified competency in thoracic ultrasonography, blind to CT findings, following a systematic approach recommended by ultrasound guidelines. LUS score was calculated according to presence, distribution, and severity of abnormalities. RESULTS: All participants had CT findings suggestive of bilateral COVID-19 pneumonia, with an average visual scoring of 43 ± 24%. LUS identified 4 different possible -abnormalities, with bilateral distribution (average LUS score 15 ± 5): focal areas of nonconfluent B lines, diffuse confluent B lines, small subpleural microconsolidations with pleural line irregularities, and large parenchymal consolidations with air bronchograms. LUS score was significantly correlated with CT visual scoring (r = 0.65, p < 0.001) and oxygen saturation in room air (r = -0.66, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: When integrated with clinical data, LUS could represent a valid diagnostic aid in patients with suspect COVID-19 pneumonia, which reflects CT findings.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ultrasonography/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Correlation of Data , Diagnostic Tests, Routine/methods , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Point-of-Care Testing , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Acta Biomed ; 91(2): 169-171, 2020 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-316249

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a new virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a respiratory disease that ranges from an asymptomatic or mild flu-like illness to severe pneumonia, multiorgan failure, and death. Imaging might play an important role in clinical decision making by supporting rapid triage of patients with suspected COVID-19 and assessing supervening complications, such as super-added bacterial infection and thrombosis. Further studies will clarify the real impact of imaging on COVID-19 patients' management and the potential role of radiology in future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
15.
Radiology ; 296(2): E86-E96, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-71894

ABSTRACT

Background CT of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 disease depicts the extent of lung involvement in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. Purpose To determine the value of quantification of the well-aerated lung (WAL) obtained at admission chest CT to determine prognosis in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Materials and Methods Imaging of patients admitted at the emergency department between February 17 and March 10, 2020 who underwent chest CT were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with negative results of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 at nasal-pharyngeal swabbing, negative chest CT findings, and incomplete clinical data were excluded. CT images were analyzed for quantification of WAL visually (%V-WAL), with open-source software (%S-WAL), and with absolute volume (VOL-WAL). Clinical parameters included patient characteristics, comorbidities, symptom type and duration, oxygen saturation, and laboratory values. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between clinical parameters and CT metrics versus patient outcome (intensive care unit [ICU] admission or death vs no ICU admission or death). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine model performance. Results The study included 236 patients (59 of 123 [25%] were female; median age, 68 years). A %V-WAL less than 73% (odds ratio [OR], 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.7, 10.8; P < .001), %S-WAL less than 71% (OR, 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9, 7.5; P < .001), and VOL-WAL less than 2.9 L (OR, 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 5.8; P < .01) were predictors of ICU admission or death. In comparison with clinical models containing only clinical parameters (AUC = 0.83), all three quantitative models showed better diagnostic performance (AUC = 0.86 for all models). The models containing %V-WAL less than 73% and VOL-WAL less than 2.9 L were superior in terms of performance as compared with the models containing only clinical parameters (P = .04 for both models). Conclusion In patients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia, visual or software quantification of the extent of CT lung abnormality were predictors of intensive care unit admission or death. © RSNA, 2020 Online supplemental material is available for this article.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
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