Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 30
Filter
1.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 61(25): e202201063, 2022 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1825860

ABSTRACT

During the global crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, university programs, meetings, and conferences have moved to virtual settings, with consequent erosion of mentorship opportunities for students and early-career professionals. This calls for mentorship platforms that are adapted to the new landscape in order to bring about a positive change. Our Viewpoint Article shares the perspective of the Transformative Education program and Mentorship Talks initiative at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon, with the aim of providing insights that could stimulate other mentorship platforms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , United States
2.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 89(Suppl 1): S65-S72, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722746

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Resilience is defined as an individual's positive adaptation to stressors. The COVID-19 pandemic represents a generalized stressor which may affect differently people living with HIV (PLWH). The objective of this study was to characterize resilience in PLWH with particular regarding the identification of frailty-resilience phenotypes, which may differently affect health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). METHODS: This was an observational study of PLWH attending Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic. Frailty was assessed in 2019, before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic by using 37-Item frailty index ranging from 0 to 1. The frailty index score was categorized as fit (<0.25) or frail (>0.25). In January 2021, PLWH were offered to complete a set of electronic questionnaires including the CD-RISC-25 for resilience and EQ-5D5L and SF-36 for HR-QoL. Resilience was defined as CD-RISC-25 score >75.7 (ranging from 0 to 100). RESULTS: Of 800 PLWH reached by mail, 575 (72%) completed the questionnaires. The median age and HIV duration were 54.5 and 24.3 years, respectively. Impaired resilience was associated with loneliness [odds ratio (OR = 2.39; 1.20 to 4.76, P < 0.001)]. Predictors for EQ-5D5L <89.7% were the phenotypes "frail/nonresilient" [OR = 5.21, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.62 to 10.33] and "fit/nonresilient" (OR = 5.48, 95% CI: 2.8 to 10.74). Predictors for SF-36 <64.40 were the phenotypes "frail/nonresilient" (OR = 7.43, 95% CI: 2.57 to 21.22) and "fit/nonresilient" (OR = 6.27, 95% CI: 2.17 to 18.16). Both models were corrected for age, sex, HIV duration, and nadir CD4. CONCLUSIONS: Resilience characterizes the well-being of PLWH during the COVID-19 crisis. This construct is complementary to frailty in the identification of clinical phenotypes with different impacts on HR-QoL.


Subject(s)
Aging , COVID-19/psychology , Frail Elderly/psychology , Frailty/psychology , HIV Infections/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-320080

ABSTRACT

Monocyte Distribution Width (MDW), a new cytometric parameter correlating with cytomorphologic changes occurring upon massive monocyte activation, has recently emerged as promising early biomarker of sepsis. Similar to sepsis, monocyte/macrophage subsets are considered key mediators of the life-threatening hyper-inflammatory disorder characterizing severe COVID-19. In this study, we longitudinally analyzed MDW values in a cohort of 87 COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to our hospital, showing significant correlations between MDW and common inflammatory markers, namely CRP (p<0.001), fibrinogen (p<0.001) and ferritin (p<0.01). Moreover, high MDW values resulted to be prognostically associated with fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients (AUC=0.76, 95% CI: 0.66-0.87, sensitivity 0.75, specificity 0.70, MDW threshold 26.4;RR=4.91, 95% CI: 1.73-13.96;OR=7.14, 95% CI: 2.06-24.71). This pilot study shows that MDW can be useful in the monitoring of COVID-19 patients, as this innovative hematologic biomarker is: (i) easy to obtain, (ii) directly related to the activation state of a fundamental inflammatory cell subset (i.e. monocytes, pivotal in both cytokine storm and sepsis immunopathogenesis), (iii) well correlated with clinical severity of COVID-19-associated inflammatory disorder, and, in turn, (iv) endowed with relevant prognostic significance. Additional studies are needed to define further the clinical impact of MDW testing in the management of COVID-19 patients.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306884

ABSTRACT

We have deeply investigated T cell compartment, plasma cytokines and cells producing cytokines in patients affected by Covid-19. At admission, patients were lymphopenic;in all of them SARS-CoV-2 was detected in a nasopharyngeal swab specimen by real-time RT-PCR, and pneumonia was subsequently confirmed by X-rays.Detailed 18-parameter flow cytometry was performed in 21 patients and 13 controls. Coupling polychromatic cytometry with unsupervised data analysis, we found that patients show an increased amount of CD4+ T lymphocytes that were activated, exhausted, stem memory or Treg. Similar results concerning activation and exhaustion were found in the CD8+ T cell compartment, within which the differences were even greater.Measuring plasma level of 31 cytokines linked to inflammation revealed that Covid-19 showed a dramatic increase of several molecules, such as TH1 and TH2 cytokines, chemokines, galectins, pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, confirming the importance of a massive immune activation causing the cytokine storm. Then, intracellular staining detecting the simultaneous production of different cytokines after a para-physiologic stimulus given by anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs revealed not only a high capacity to produce a variety of molecules, including TNF-a, IFN-g and IL-2, but also a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells towards the TH17 phenotype.A therapeutic approach now exists based on the administration of drugs that block IL-6 pathway, and is now consistently improving the course of the disease. IL-17 is crucial in recruiting and activating neutrophils, cells that can migrate to the lung and are heavily involved in the pathogenesis of Covid-19. We show here that a significant skewing of activated T cells towards TH17 functional phenotype exists in Covid-19 patients. Thus, we suggest that blocking IL-17 pathway by already available biological drugs that are used to treat different pathologies could be a novel, additional strategy to improve the health of patients infected by SARS-CoV-2.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306562

ABSTRACT

Background: The study analysed risk factors for bacterial and fungal co-infection in patients with COVID-19 and the impact on mortality. Methods: This is a single-center retrospective study conducted on 387 patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to an Italian Tertiary-care hospital, between 21 February 2020 and 31 May 2020. Bacterial/fungal coinfection was determined by the presence of characteristic clinical features and positive culture results. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors for the development of bacterial/fungal co-infection after adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Thirty-day survival of the patients with or without co-infections was analysed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In 53/387 (13.7%) patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, 67 episodes of bacterial/fungal co-infection occurred (14 presented >1 episode). Pneumonia was the most frequent co-infection (47.7%), followed by BSI (34.3%) and UTI (11.9%). S. aureus was responsible for 24 episodes (35.8%), E. coli for 7 (10.4%), P. aerugionsa and Enterococcus spp. for 5 episodes each (7.4%). Five (7.4%) pulmonary aspergillosis, 3 (4.4%) pneumocystosis and 5 (7.4%) invasive candidiases were observed. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk of infection in patients with an age>65 years (csHR 2.680;95%CI: 1.254 - 5.727;p=0.054), with cancer (csHR 5.243;95%CI: 1.173-23.423;p=0.030), with a LOS>10 days (csHR 12.507;95%CI: 2.659 – 58.830;p=0.001), early (within 48h) admitted in ICU (csHR 11.766;95% CI: 4.353-31.804;p<0.001), and with a SOFA score>5 (csHR 3.397;95% CI: 1.091 - 10.581;p=0.035). Estimated cumulative risk of developing at least 1 bacterial/fungal co-infection episode was of 15% and 27% after 15 and 30 days from admission, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimated a higher cumulative probability of death in patients with bacterial/fungal co-infection (log-rank=0.031). Thirty-day mortality rate of patients with pneumonia was 38.7%, higher than those with BSI (30.4%). Conclusions: Bacterial and fungal infections are a serious complication affecting the survival of patients with COVID-19-related pneumonia. Some issues need to be investigated, such as the best empirical antibiotic therapy and the need for possible antifungal prophylaxis.

6.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(3): ofac003, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A proposal has recently been advanced to change the traditional definition of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), to reflect the cluster of metabolic abnormalities that may be more closely associated with cardiovascular risk. Long coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a smoldering inflammatory condition, characterized by several symptom clusters. This study aims to determine the prevalence of MAFLD in patients with postacute COVID syndrome (PACS) and its association with other PACS-cluster phenotypes. METHODS: We included 235 patients observed at a single university outpatient clinic. The diagnosis of PACS was based on ≥1 cluster of symptoms: respiratory, neurocognitive, musculoskeletal, psychological, sensory, and dermatological. The outcome was prevalence of MAFLD detected by transient elastography during the first postdischarge follow-up outpatient visit. The prevalence of MAFLD at the time of hospital admission was calculated retrospectively using the hepatic steatosis index. RESULTS: Of 235 patients, 162 (69%) were men (median age 61). The prevalence of MAFLD was 55.3% at follow-up and 37.3% on admission (P < .001). Insulin resistance (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.96), body mass index (OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.24), and the metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.54; 95% CI, 1.13-5.68) were independent predictors of MAFLD. The number of PACS clusters was inversely associated with MAFLD (OR = 0.86; 95% CI, .76-0.97). Thirty-one patients (13.2%) had MAFLD with no other associated PACS clusters. All correlations between MAFLD and other PACS clusters were weak. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic-associated fatty liver disease was highly prevalent after hospital discharge and may represent a specific PACS-cluster phenotype, with potential long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health implications.

7.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e054069, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The first COVID-19-19 epidemic wave was over the period of February-May 2020. Since 1 October 2020, Italy, as many other European countries, faced a second wave. The aim of this analysis was to compare the 28-day mortality between the two waves among COVID-19 hospitalised patients. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. Standard survival analysis was performed to compare all-cause mortality within 28 days after hospital admission in the two waves. Kaplan-Meier curves as well as Cox regression model analysis were used. The effect of wave on risk of death was shown by means of HRs with 95% CIs. A sensitivity analysis around the impact of the circulating variant as a potential unmeasured confounder was performed. SETTING: University Hospital of Modena, Italy. Patients admitted to the hospital for severe COVID-19 pneumonia during the first (22 February-31 May 2020) and second (1 October-31 December 2020) waves were included. RESULTS: During the two study periods, a total of 1472 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia were admitted to our hospital, 449 during the first wave and 1023 during the second. Median age was 70 years (IQR 56-80), 37% women, 49% with PaO2/FiO2 <250 mm Hg, 82% with ≥1 comorbidity, median duration of symptoms was 6 days. 28-day mortality rate was 20.0% (95% CI 16.3 to 23.7) during the first wave vs 14.2% (95% CI 12.0 to 16.3) in the second (log-rank test p value=0.03). After including key predictors of death in the multivariable Cox regression model, the data still strongly suggested a lower 28-day mortality rate in the second wave (aHR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.90, p value=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our hospitalised patients with COVID-19 with severe pneumonia, the 28-day mortality appeared to be reduced by 36% during the second as compared with the first wave. Further studies are needed to identify factors that may have contributed to this improved survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
8.
Infez Med ; 29(4): 538-549, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579085

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular complications after a SARS-CoV-2 infection are a phenomenon of relevant scientific interest. The aim of this study was to analyze the onset of post-COVID-19 cardiovascular events in patients hospitalized in a tertiary care center. This is a retrospective study conducted on patients hospitalized over a period of three months. The patients were older than 18 years of age and had a diagnosis of COVID-19 infection confirmed from a nasopharyngeal swab sample. Anamnestic and clinical-laboratory data were collected. Cardiovascular events at 30 days were defined as follows: arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and pulmonary embolism. Univariate analysis (Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, as appropriate) and multivariate analysis (multinomial logistic regression) were applied to the data. A total of 394 patients were included; they were mostly males and had a median age of 65.5 years. Previous cardiovascular disease was present in 14.7% of patients. Oxygen therapy was required for 77.9%, and 53% received anticoagulant therapy. The overall 30-day mortality was 20.3%. A cardiovascular event developed in 15.7% of the subjects. These were mainly pulmonary embolism (9.4%), followed by arrhythmias (3.3%), myocardial infarction (2.3%), and myocarditis (0.8%). Patients who developed cardiovascular events upon univariate analysis were significantly older, with major comorbidities, a more compromised respiratory situation, and a higher mortality rate. Multivariate analysis revealed independent factors that were significantly associated with the development of cardiovascular events: hypertension, endotracheal intubation, and age older than 75 years. In patients with COVID-19, the development of a cardiovascular event occurs quite frequently and is mainly seen in elderly subjects with comorbidities (especially hypertension) in the presence of a severe respiratory picture.

9.
Microorganisms ; 9(9)2021 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex 1 co-infections in patients with COVID-19 are considered relatively uncommon; some reports on re-activations in patients in intensive-care units were published. The aim of the study was to analyze herpetic re-activations and their clinical manifestations in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, performing HSV-1 PCR on plasma twice a week. METHODS: we conducted a prospective, observational, single-center study involving 70 consecutive patients with severe/critical SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia tested for HSV-1 hospitalized at Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria of Modena. RESULTS: of these 70 patients, 21 (30.0%) showed detectable viremia and 13 (62%) had clinically relevant manifestations of HSV-1 infection corresponding to 15 events (4 pneumonia, 5 herpes labialis, 3 gingivostomatitis, one encephalitis and two hepatitis). HSV-1 positive patients were more frequently treated with steroids than HSV-1 negative patients (76.2% vs. 49.0%, p = 0.036) and more often underwent mechanical ventilation (IMV) (57.1% vs. 22.4%, p = 0.005). In the unadjusted logistic regression analysis, steroid treatment, IMV, and higher LDH were significantly associated with an increased risk of HSV1 re-activation (odds ratio 3.33, 4.61, and 16.9, respectively). The association with the use of steroids was even stronger after controlling for previous use of both tocilizumab and IMV (OR = 5.13, 95% CI:1.36-19.32, p = 0.016). The effect size was larger when restricting to participants who were treated with high doses of steroids while there was no evidence to support an association with the use of tocilizumab Conclusions: our study shows a high incidence of HSV-1 re-activation both virologically and clinically in patients with SARS-CoV-2 severe pneumonia, especially in those treated with steroids.

10.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(5): e1222-e1227, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398081

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an unprecedented global challenge that substantially risks reversing the progress in ending human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). At the same time, it may offer the opportunity for a new era of HIV management. This viewpoint presents the impact of COVID-19 on HIV care, including the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) "three 90s" targets. It outlines how to enhance a patient-centered care approach, now known as the "fourth 90," by integrating face-to-face patient-physician and telemedicine encounters. It suggests a framework for prevention and treatment of multimorbidity and frailty, to achieve a good health-related quality of life, and to preserve intrinsic capacity in all people living with HIV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , HIV , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0251378, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354756

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The benefit of tocilizumab on mortality and time to recovery in people with severe COVID pneumonia may depend on appropriate timing. The objective was to estimate the impact of tocilizumab administration on switching respiratory support states, mortality and time to recovery. METHODS: In an observational study, a continuous-time Markov multi-state model was used to describe the sequence of respiratory support states including: no respiratory support (NRS), oxygen therapy (OT), non-invasive ventilation (NIV) or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), OT in recovery, NRS in recovery. RESULTS: Two hundred seventy-one consecutive adult patients were included in the analyses contributing to 695 transitions across states. The prevalence of patients in each respiratory support state was estimated with stack probability plots, comparing people treated with and without tocilizumab since the beginning of the OT state. A positive effect of tocilizumab on the probability of moving from the invasive and non-invasive mechanical NIV/IMV state to the OT in recovery state (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.2-5.2) was observed. Furthermore, a reduced risk of death was observed in patients in NIV/IMV (HR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.7) or in OT (HR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.0-0.8) treated with tocilizumab. CONCLUSION: To conclude, we were able to show the positive impact of tocilizumab used in different disease stages depicted by respiratory support states. The use of the multi-state Markov model allowed to harmonize the heterogeneous mortality and recovery endpoints and summarize results with stack probability plots. This approach could inform randomized clinical trials regarding tocilizumab, support disease management and hospital decision making.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Markov Chains , Middle Aged , Noninvasive Ventilation , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
12.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(7): ofab283, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324646

ABSTRACT

We compared 90-90-90 targets in 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, with the targets across the period 2017-2019 in people with HIV. We observed a significant loss in the 90-90-90 objectives in 2020 when compared with 2017-2019 that might be attributable to the COVID-19 crisis.

13.
Kidney Res Clin Pract ; 40(2): 231-240, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prognostic value of within-day sCr variation serum creatinine variation is unknown in the setting of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We evaluated the prognostic significance of 24-hour serum creatinine variation in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A monocentric retrospective analysis was conducted in COVID-19 patients not admitted to the intensive care unit. Three groups were subdivided based on 24 hours serum creatinine variation from admission. In the stable kidney function group, 24-hour serum creatinine variation ranged from +0.05 to -0.05 mg/dL; in the decreased kidney function group, 24-hour serum creatinine variation was >0.05 mg/dL; in the improved kidney function group, 24-hour serum creatinine variation was <-0.05 mg/dL. RESULTS: The study population included 224 patients with a median age of 66.5 years and a predominance of males (72.3%). Within 24 hours of admission, renal function remained stable in 37.1% of the subjects, whereas it displayed improved and deteriorated patterns in 45.5% and 17.4%, respectively. Patients with decreased kidney function were older and had more severe COVID-19 symptoms than patients with stable or improved kidney function. About half of patients with decreased kidney function developed an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) during hospitalization. Decreased kidney function was significantly associated with AKI during hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR], 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-10.8; p < 0.001) and was an independent risk factor for 30-day in-hospital mortality (HR, 5.5; 95% CI, 1.1-28; p = 0.037). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients with decreased kidney function within 24 hours of admission were at high risk of AKI and 30-day in-hospital mortality.

14.
Clin Exp Nephrol ; 25(11): 1203-1214, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289778

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a severe complication of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). This study aims to evaluate incidence, risk factors and case-fatality rate of AKI in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We reviewed the health medical records of 307 consecutive patients with COVID-19 hospitalized at the University Hospital of Modena, Italy. RESULTS: AKI was diagnosed in 69 out of 307 (22.4%) COVID-19 patients. Stages 1, 2, or 3 AKI accounted for 57.9%, 24.6% and 17.3%, respectively. AKI patients had a mean age of 74.7 ± 9.9 years. These patients showed higher serum levels of the main markers of inflammation and higher rate of severe pneumonia than non-AKI patients. Kidney injury was associated with a higher rate of urinary abnormalities including proteinuria (0.44 ± 0.85 vs 0.18 ± 0.29 mg/mg; P = < 0.0001) and microscopic hematuria (P = 0.032) compared to non-AKI patients. Hemodialysis was performed in 7.2% of the subjects and 33.3% of the survivors did not recover kidney function after AKI. Risk factors for kidney injury were age, male sex, CKD and higher non-renal SOFA score. Patients with AKI had a mortality rate of 56.5%. Adjusted Cox regression analysis revealed that COVID-19-associated AKI was independently associated with in-hospital death (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.82; CI 95%, 1.36-17.08) compared to non-AKI patients. CONCLUSION: AKI was a common and harmful consequence of COVID-19. It manifested with urinary abnormalities (proteinuria, microscopic hematuria) and conferred an increased risk for death. Given the well-known short-term sequelae of AKI, prevention of kidney injury is imperative in this vulnerable cohort of patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hematuria/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Proteinuria/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12716, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275959

ABSTRACT

Monocyte Distribution Width (MDW), a new cytometric parameter correlating with cytomorphologic changes occurring upon massive monocyte activation, has recently emerged as promising early biomarker of sepsis. Similar to sepsis, monocyte/macrophage subsets are considered key mediators of the life-threatening hyper-inflammatory disorder characterizing severe COVID-19. In this study, we longitudinally analyzed MDW values in a cohort of 87 COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to our hospital, showing significant correlations between MDW and common inflammatory markers, namely CRP (p < 0.001), fibrinogen (p < 0.001) and ferritin (p < 0.01). Moreover, high MDW values resulted to be prognostically associated with fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients (AUC = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.66-0.87, sensitivity 0.75, specificity 0.70, MDW threshold 26.4; RR = 4.91, 95% CI: 1.73-13.96; OR = 7.14, 95% CI: 2.06-24.71). This pilot study shows that MDW can be useful in the monitoring of COVID-19 patients, as this innovative hematologic biomarker is: (1) easy to obtain, (2) directly related to the activation state of a fundamental inflammatory cell subset (i.e. monocytes, pivotal in both cytokine storm and sepsis immunopathogenesis), (3) well correlated with clinical severity of COVID-19-associated inflammatory disorder, and, in turn, (4) endowed with relevant prognostic significance. Additional studies are needed to define further the clinical impact of MDW testing in the management of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cell Size , Monocytes/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Pilot Projects , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
16.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 54(2): 405-410, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265550

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acid-base derangement has been poorly described in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Considering the high prevalence of pneumonia and kidneys injury in COVID-19, frequent acid-base alterations are expected in patients admitted with SARS-Cov-2 infection. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of acid-base disorders in symptomatic patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19. METHODS: The retrospective study enrolled COVID-19 patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Modena from 4 March to 20 June 2020. Baseline arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis was collected in 211 patients. In subjects with multiple ABG analysis, we selected only the first measurement. A pH of less than 7.37 was categorized as acidemia and a pH of more than 7.43 was categorized as alkalemia. RESULTS: ABG analyses revealed a low arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PO2, 70.2 ± 25.1 mmHg), oxygen saturation (SO2, 92%) and a mild reduction of PO2/FiO2 ratio (231 ± 129). Acid-base alterations were found in 79.7% of the patient. Metabolic alkalosis (33.6%) was the main alteration followed by respiratory alkalosis (30.3%), combined alkalosis (9.4%), respiratory acidosis (3.3%), metabolic acidosis (2.8%) and other compensated acid-base disturbances (3.6%). All six patients with metabolic acidosis died at the end of the follow-up. CONCLUSION: Variations of pH occurred in the majority (79.7%) of patients admitted with COVID-19. The patients experienced all the type of acid-base disorders, notably metabolic and respiratory alkalosis were the most common alterations in this group of patients.


Subject(s)
Acid-Base Imbalance/epidemiology , Acid-Base Imbalance/virology , COVID-19/complications , Acid-Base Imbalance/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate
17.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251768, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229049

ABSTRACT

We assessed the impact of chest CT body composition parameters on outcomes and disease severity at hospital presentation of COVID-19 patients, focusing also on the possible mediation of body composition in the relationship between age and death in these patients. Chest CT scans performed at hospital presentation by consecutive COVID-19 patients (02/27/2020-03/13/2020) were retrospectively reviewed to obtain pectoralis muscle density and total, visceral, and intermuscular adipose tissue areas (TAT, VAT, IMAT) at the level of T7-T8 vertebrae. Primary outcomes were: hospitalization, mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or death, death alone. Secondary outcomes were: C-reactive protein (CRP), oxygen saturation (SO2), CT disease extension at hospital presentation. The mediation of body composition in the effect of age on death was explored. Of the 318 patients included in the study (median age 65.7 years, females 37.7%), 205 (64.5%) were hospitalized, 68 (21.4%) needed MV, and 58 (18.2%) died. Increased muscle density was a protective factor while increased TAT, VAT, and IMAT were risk factors for hospitalization and MV/death. All these parameters except TAT had borderline effects on death alone. All parameters were associated with SO2 and extension of lung parenchymal involvement at CT; VAT was associated with CRP. Approximately 3% of the effect of age on death was mediated by decreased muscle density. In conclusion, low muscle quality and ectopic fat accumulation were associated with COVID-19 outcomes, VAT was associated with baseline inflammation. Low muscle quality partly mediated the effect of age on mortality.


Subject(s)
Body Composition , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Intra-Abdominal Fat/diagnostic imaging , Mass Chest X-Ray/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
18.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 37(4): 283-291, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207222

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate both positive outcomes, including reduction of respiratory support aid and duration of hospital stay, and negative ones, including mortality and a composite of invasive mechanical ventilation or death, in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia treated with or without oral darunavir/cobicistat (DRV/c, 800/150 mg/day) used in different treatment durations. The secondary objective was to evaluate the percentage of patients treated with DRV/c who were exposed to potentially severe drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and died during hospitalization. This observational retrospective study was conducted in consecutive patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Modena, Italy. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to compare patients receiving standard of care with or without DRV/c. Adjustment for key confounders was applied. Two hundred seventy-three patients (115 on DRV/c) were included, 75.8% males, mean age was 64.6 (±13.2) years. Clinical improvement was similar between the groups, depicted by respiratory aid switch (p > .05). The same was observed for duration of hospital stay [13.2 (±8.9) for DRV/c vs. 13.4 (±7.2) days for no-DRV/c, p = .9]. Patients on DRV/c had higher rates of mortality (25.2% vs. 10.1%, p < .0001. The rate of composite outcome of mechanical ventilation and death was higher in the DRV/c group (37.4% vs. 25.3%, p = .03). Multiple serious DDI associated with DRV/c were observed in the 19 patients who died. DRV/c should not be recommended as a treatment option for COVID-19 pneumonia outside clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cobicistat/therapeutic use , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Adult , Anti-HIV Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cobicistat/adverse effects , Darunavir/adverse effects , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39(5): 1119-1125, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The results of the RECOVERY trial identified dexamethasone as the first pharmacological therapy that reduces mortality in patients with COVID-19. The aim of this paper is to conduct a systematic literature review on safety and efficacy of pulse glucocorticoid therapy for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoronaVirus (CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-CoV or SARS-CoV-2 infections and describe a case-series of COVID-19 patients treated with off-label pulse doses of methylprednisolone. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review on safety and efficacy of pulse therapy for betacoronaviridae infections as described in the protocol registered on PROSPERO (CRD42020190183). All consecutive patients admitted to Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova di Reggio Emilia or Guastalla Hospital with COVID-19 between March 1st and April 30th, 2020 and treated with methylprednisolone 1 gram/day for at least three days were included in the case series. A retrospective review of available computed tomography (CT) scan and chest x-ray was performed independently by two radiologists blinded to clinical data, and discordances were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: Twenty papers were included for SARS, but only two were comparative and were included in the primary endpoint analysis. Likewise, eleven papers were included for COVID-19, four of which were comparative and were considered for the primary outcome analysis. Included studies for both SARS and COVID-19 are mostly retrospective and highly heterogeneous, with lethality ranging from 0% to 100% and ICU admission rate ranging from 9% to 100%. Fourteen patients were included in our case series, 7 males and 7 females. CONCLUSIONS: No randomised controlled trial is available yet for corticosteroids pulse-therapy defined as at least ≥500mg/day methylprednisolone in patients with emerging coronavirus pneumonia. Lethality among our cohort is high (4/14), but this finding should be interpreted with caution due to the fact that in our setting pulse-steroids were used in patients not eligible for other treatments because of comorbidities or as rescue therapy. The incidence of steroid-related adverse events seems low in our cohort. The quality of the evidence on glucocorticoid pulse-therapy in SARS, MERS and COVID-19 is poor. Randomised controlled trials are greatly needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronaviridae , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
20.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0247275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097208

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this secondary analysis of the TESEO cohort is to identify, early in the course of treatment with tocilizumab, factors associated with the risk of progressing to mechanical ventilation and death and develop a risk score to estimate the risk of this outcome according to patients' profile. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 severe pneumonia receiving standard of care + tocilizumab who were alive and free from mechanical ventilation at day 6 after treatment initiation were included in this retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Multivariable logistic regression models were built to identify predictors of mechanical ventilation or death by day-28 from treatment initiation and ß-coefficients were used to develop a risk score. Secondary outcome was mortality. Patients with the same inclusion criteria as the derivation cohort from 3 independent hospitals were used as validation cohort. RESULTS: 266 patients treated with tocilizumab were included. By day 28 of hospital follow-up post treatment initiation, 40 (15%) underwent mechanical ventilation or died [26 (10%)]. At multivariable analysis, sex, day-4 PaO2/FiO2 ratio, platelets and CRP were independently associated with the risk of developing the study outcomes and were used to generate the proposed risk score. The accuracy of the score in AUC was 0.80 and 0.70 in internal validation and test for the composite endpoint and 0.92 and 0.69 for death, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our score could assist clinicians in identifying, early after tocilizumab administration, patients who are likely to progress to mechanical ventilation or death, so that they could be selected for eventual rescue therapies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL