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1.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 442, 2023 01 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186073

ABSTRACT

Non-invasive oxygen saturation (SpO2) is a central vital sign used to shape the management of COVID-19 patients. Yet, there have been no report quantitatively describing SpO2 dynamics and patterns in COVID-19 patients using continuous SpO2 recordings. We performed a retrospective observational analysis of the clinical information and 27 K hours of continuous SpO2 high-resolution (1 Hz) recordings of 367 critical and non-critical COVID-19 patients hospitalised at the Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel. An absolute SpO2 threshold of 93% most efficiently discriminated between critical and non-critical patients, regardless of oxygen support. Oximetry-derived digital biomarker (OBMs) computed per 1 h monitoring window showed significant differences between groups, notably the cumulative time below 93% SpO2 (CT93). Patients with CT93 above 60% during the first hour of monitoring, were more likely to require oxygen support. Mechanical ventilation exhibited a strong effect on SpO2 dynamics by significantly reducing the frequency and depth of desaturations. OBMs related to periodicity and hypoxic burden were markedly affected, up to several hours before the initiation of the mechanical ventilation. In summary, OBMs, traditionally used in the field of sleep medicine research, are informative for continuous assessment of disease severity and response to respiratory support of hospitalised COVID-19 patients. In conclusion, OBMs may improve risk stratification and therapy management of critical care patients with respiratory impairment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Oximetry , Oxygen , Respiratory Rate
2.
Scand J Med Sci Sports ; 31(1): 70-75, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791987

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 outbreak has a profound impact on almost every aspect of life. Universal masking is recommended as a means of source control. Routinely exercising in a safe environment is an important strategy for healthy living during this crisis. As sports clubs and public spaces may serve a source of viral transmission, masking may become an integral part of physical activity. This study aimed to assess the physiological effects of wearing surgical masks and N95 respirators during short-term strenuous workout. This was a multiple cross-over trial of healthy volunteers. Using a standard cycle ergometry ramp protocol, each subject performed a maximal exercise test without a mask, with a surgical mask, and with an N95 respirator. Physiological parameters and time to exhaustion were compared. Each subject served his own control. Sixteen male volunteers (mean age and BMI of 34 ± 4 years and 28.72 ± 3.78 kg/m2 , respectively) completed the protocol. Heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and time to exhaustion did not differ significantly. Exercising with N95 mask was associated with a significant increase in end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2 ) levels. The differences were more prominent as the load increased, reaching 8 mm Hg at exhaustion (none vs N95, P = .001). In conclusion, in healthy subjects, short-term moderate-strenuous aerobic physical activity with a mask is feasible, safe, and associated with only minor changes in physiological parameters, particularly a mild increase in EtCO2 . Subjects suffering from lung diseases should have a cautious evaluation before attempting physical activity with any mask.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise , Masks , N95 Respirators , Pandemics , Adult , Cross-Over Studies , Exercise Test , Humans , Male , Return to Sport
3.
Simul Healthc ; 15(6): 445-446, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780608

ABSTRACT

STATEMENT: Shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline healthcare workers managing the current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is a major, global challenge. In this pilot study, we describe a simulation-based method for evaluating the suitability and acceptability of an alternative biological isolation garment (BIG, a gown or a suit) for clinical use by emergency department (ED) personnel. Using a high-fidelity simulator, participants provided airway management according to the SARS-CoV-2 protocol. A nonvisible fluorescent marker was used as a surrogate marker of contamination. We assessed ultraviolet light visualization of the fluorescent marker after doffing and satisfaction with donning, use during simulation, and doffing. We found that after doffing, markers were not visualized on any of the participants and that the median satisfaction scores of the alternative and standard BIG (sBIG) were 4 [interquartile range (IQR) = 1-5] and 4 (IQR = 2-4), respectively. The results suggest the suitability and acceptability of the alternative BIG (aBIG) for use by ED personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , High Fidelity Simulation Training/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Airway Management/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , High Fidelity Simulation Training/standards , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Rambam Maimonides Med J ; 11(3)2020 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721597

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has remarkably challenged health care organizations and societies. A key strategy for confronting the disease implications on individuals and communities was based on harnessing multidisciplinary efforts to develop technologies for mitigating the disease spread and its deleterious clinical implications. One of the main challenging characteristics of COVID-19 is the provision of medical care to patients with a highly infective disease mandating the use of isolation measures. Such care is complicated by the need for complex critical care, dynamic treatment guidelines, and a vague knowledge regarding the disease's pathophysiology. A second key component of this challenge was the overwhelming surge in patient burden and the relative lack of trained staff and medical equipment which required rapid re-organization of large systems and augmenting health care efficiencies to unprecedented levels. In contrast to the risk management strategies employed to mitigate other serious threats and the billions of dollars that are invested in reducing these risks annually by governments around the world, no such preparation has been shown to be of effect during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Unmet needs were identified within the newly opened COVID-19 departments together with the urgent need for reliable information for effective decision-making at the state level.This review article describes the early research and development response in Israel under the scope of in-hospital patient care, such as non-contact sensing of patients' vital signs, and how it could potentially be weaved into a practical big picture at the hospital or national level using a strategic management system. At this stage, some of the described technologies are still in developmental or clinical evidence generation phases with respect to COVID-19 settings. While waiting for future publications describing the results of the ongoing evidence generation efforts, one should be aware of this trend as these emerging tools have the potential to further benefit patients as well as caregivers and health care systems beyond the scope of the current pandemic as well as confronting future surges in the number of cases.

5.
Journal of Clinical Medicine ; 9(7):2282, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-650877

ABSTRACT

Knowledge of the outcomes of critically ill patients is crucial for health and government officials who are planning how to address local outbreaks. The factors associated with outcomes of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) who required treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU) are yet to be determined. Methods: This was a retrospective registry-based case series of patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 who were referred for ICU admission and treated in the ICUs of the 13 participating centers in Israel between 5 March and 27 April 2020. Demographic and clinical data including clinical management were collected and subjected to a multivariable analysis;primary outcome was mortality. Results: This study included 156 patients (median age = 72 years (range = 22-97 years));69% (108 of 156) were male. Eighty-nine percent (139 of 156) of patients had at least one comorbidity. One hundred three patients (66%) required invasive mechanical ventilation. As of 8 May 2020, the median length of stay in the ICU was 10 days (range = 0-37 days). The overall mortality rate was 56%;a multivariable regression model revealed that increasing age (OR = 1.08 for each year of age, 95%CI = 1.03-1.13), the presence of sepsis (OR = 1.08 for each year of age, 95%CI = 1.03-1.13), and a shorter ICU stay(OR = 0.90 for each day, 95% CI = 0.84-0.96) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: In our case series, we found lower mortality rates than those in exhausted health systems. The results of our multivariable model suggest that further evaluation is needed of antiviral and antibacterial agents in the treatment of sepsis and secondary infection.

6.
J Crit Care ; 59: 35-36, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-381756
8.
J Crit Care ; 58: 56-57, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-88448
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