Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
American Journal of Health Promotion ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2020870

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Information on incentives for COVID-19 testing is needed to understand effective practices that encourage testing uptake. We describe characteristics of those who received an incentive after performing a rapid antigen test. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive analysis of survey data. Setting: During April 29–May 9, 2021, COVID-19 rapid antigen testing was offered in 2 Maryland cities. Sample: Convenience sample of 553 adults (≥18 years) who tested and received an incentive;93% consented to survey. Measures: Survey questions assessed reasons for testing, testing history, barriers, and demographics. Analysis: Robust Poisson regressions were used to determine characteristic differences based on testing history and between participants who would re-test in the future without an incentive vs participants who would not. Results: The most common reasons for testing were the desire to be tested (n = 280;54%) and convenience of location (n = 146;28%). Those motivated by an incentive to test (n = 110;21%) were 5.83 times as likely to state they would not test again without an incentive, compared to those with other reasons for testing (95% CI: 2.67-12.72, P <.001). Critical Limitations: No comparative study group. Conclusion: Results indicate internal motivation and convenience were prominent factors supporting testing uptake. Incentives may increase community testing participation, particularly among people who have never tested. Keywords COVID-19, pandemic, incentives, health behavior, community testing. © The Author(s) 2022.

2.
US Endocrinology ; 17(1):10-13, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1766544

ABSTRACT

We assessed real-time continuous glucose monitoring (rtCGM) data in an individual with type 2 diabetes who presented with severe symptoms of COVID-19, and suffered a fatal cardiac arrest during hospitalization. In this retrospective analysis, we used rtCGM to evaluate changes in blood glucose levels in a 71-year-old male with COVID-19 symptoms who suffered a fatal cardiac arrest. Blood glucose levels remained constant at 220–225 mg/dL after the first cardiac arrest, slowly decreased to 167 mg/dL after return of spontaneous circulation was achieved, and rose to 198 mg/dL prior to the second arrest. After the patient expired, glucose levels decreased to the 141 mg/dL over the first hour, but quickly declined to undetectable levels within the next 20 minutes. Wider adoption of rtCGM use in patients with COVID-19 may help identify blood glucose patterns and uncover new insights to various comorbidities and conditions

4.
Circulation ; 144(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1631427

ABSTRACT

Background: In the presence of comorbid conditions, COVID-19 infections are known to require more advanced treatment, poorer outcomes and have longer-term sequelae. New-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) during COVID-19 infection has been associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes but not mortality. However, it remains unclear whether a prior history (hx) of atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular risk factor predicting a worse outcome in COVID-19 patients. As such, we examined, using propensity matching accounting for possible confounders, the need for advanced treatment and subsequent major cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with a prior hx of AF with COVID19 infection. Methods: From March 2020 to May 2021, patients testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 with a prior AF diagnosis (n=3119) were propensity matched for age, gender, race/ethnicity, prior coronary artery disease (CAD), prior heart failure (HF), prior stroke and hypertension to non-AF SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. Cox hazard regression analysis with multivariable adjustment was used to determine risk of subsequent MACE (all-cause death, myocardial infarction, HF and stroke). Results: Baseline characteristics, treatments, and outcomes stratified by AF status are shown in the Table. While the groups had similar baseline characteristics, AF COVID-19 patients were more likely to require hospitalization, ICU care, and ventilator support. Consistent with our hypothesis, composite MACE event rates were higher in the AF patients (HR=1.60, p<0.0001) secondary to increases in heart failure and all-cause mortality rates. Conclusions: These data support AF as a cardiovascular risk factor predicting worse outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Specifically, AF increases the need for advanced treatments such as hospitalization, ICU care and ventilator support resulting in an increase in subsequent heart failure and all-cause mortality.

5.
Water International ; 45(5):416-422, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1532260

ABSTRACT

Household water insecurity may exacerbate the COVID-19 pandemic and exact an even greater toll on people, especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America, simply because too many people do not have access to safe and secure water services, including water supply and sanitation, at home. Recent studies have shown that as many as a quarter of households in the Global South may be unable to practise necessary hand hygiene. Megacities may be at particular risk of being unable to manage the COVID-19 pandemic due to sheer population density as well as a lack of reliable clean water and sanitation. Problems of water insecurity are not restricted to the Global South but extend into higher-income countries as well. The steady decline in provision of public sanitation around the world, even in wealthy countries, makes adequate hygiene an even more intractable problem.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL