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Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 17(4), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067098

ABSTRACT

Background: The application of methylprednisolone in ARDS patients has led to a sustained reduction in inflammatory plasma cytokines and chemokines and has recently been used in the treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Objectives: In this study, the effect of methylprednisolone on clinical symptoms and antioxidant changes of patients with COVID-19 has been investigated. Methods: In the present study, patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 who required hospitalization were entered into the study phase. Then, in addition to standard treatment, patients received methylprednisolone at a dose of 250 mg intravenously over three days. Necessary evaluations include analysis of arterial blood gases, pulse oximetry, monitoring of patient clinical signs, examination of inflammatory biomarkers, and also receiving 10 cc of peripheral blood samples to check for antioxidant changes, at the beginning of the study, after 24 hours, and 72 hours after receiving methylprednisolone was on the agenda. Results: Changes in fever, superoxide dismutase (SOD, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST, the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP, malondialdehyde (MDA, Nitric oxide, Ferritin, and TNF-α before treatment and 72 hours after treatment were significantly different between the two stages (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of methylprednisolone improves the balance of antioxidants and immunological factors in patients with COVID-19 and thus improves some clinical indicators in these patients.

2.
Journal of Renal Injury Prevention ; 11(2):9, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1870288

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The unrelenting storm of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) since late 2019 has turned into a crucial health matter of the globe. There is increasing evidence in terms of a hypercoagulable state by this infection. Objectives: The current study aims to clarify the association between thromboembolic events in COVID-19 and the patient, the infection and in-hospital related characteristics. Patients and Methods: The current case-control study has been conducted on 243 COVID-19 pneumonia patients including 83 cases with thrombotic events and 160 controls without thrombosis. The thrombotic events included deep venous thrombosis (DVT) (n = 9), pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) (n = 48), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 17), cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) (n = 4) and arterial thrombosis (n = 5). On admission, hemodynamic parameters, on admission laboratory assessments, mobility during hospitalization, type of oxygenation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission requirement and duration of ICU and also hospital stay were recorded in the checklist. Results: According to logistic regression assessment, on admission O2 saturation (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99), hemoglobin level (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.77-0.97) and albumin level (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.3-0.86) were independently correlated with thrombosis due to COVID-19. Other factors, including demographic, infection severity, laboratory and in-hospital characteristics, were not significantly associated with thrombotic events. Conclusion: Based on this study's findings, hemoglobin and albumin levels were the independent factors associated with the thrombotic events in COVID-19 patients.

3.
TANAFFOS Journal of Respiratory Disease, Thoracic Surgery, Intensive Care and Tuberculosis ; 19(2):91-99, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1489864

ABSTRACT

This article presents the guideline released by the National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Masih Daneshvari Hospital COVID-19 Expert Group, that aims to help the clinicians caring for patients admitted to hospitals with confirmed or suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. This guideline includes classification of disease severity, makes use of the indications of a virological assay, of an imaging study, and that of hospital admission. In addition, protocol of treatment is also presented, with chloroquine, lopinavir/ritonavir, remdesivir, favipiravir, umifenovir, oseltamivir, and ribavirin as possible medications, and interferon beta-1a, steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), tocilizumab, and convalescent plasma for severe cases. This guidelines also discusses details on ICU care, hospital discharge planning, and follow up.

4.
Tanaffus ; 20(1):71-74, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357847

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pneumonia has invaded the world and continues to expand. The current evidence of the immune system reaction to this viral pneumonia shows that the post-infectious immunity against the virus may be temporary, and the virus may reinfect the patients after healing from the previous one. Here is presented a 55-year-old female patient, as a known case of Hodgkin lymphoma, diagnosed with COVID-19 reinfection during 40 days. Such evidence may be helpful in further understanding the immunology of the disease.

5.
TANAFFOS Journal of Respiratory Disease, Thoracic Surgery, Intensive Care and Tuberculosis ; 19(2):122-128, 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-941822

ABSTRACT

Background: Following the recent epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China, a novel betacoronavirus was isolated from two patients in Iran on February 19, 2020. In this study, we aimed to determine the clinical manifestations and outcomes of the first confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection (n=127). Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on all COVID-19-suspected cases, admitted to Masih Daneshvari Hospital (a designated hospital for COVID-19), Tehran, Iran, since February 19, 2020. All patients were tested for COVID-19, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Data of confirmed cases, including demographic characteristics, clinical features, and outcomes, were collected and compared between three groups of patients, requiring different types of admission (requiring ICU admission, admission to the general ward, and transfer to ICU).

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