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1.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(19):3628-3636, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20239853

ABSTRACT

Higher education has not been immune to the widespread disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, commonly known as COVID-19. Colleges have quickly evolved and adapted to this new normal, from leaving campuses to investing in online instruction and assisting students and staff remotely. However, international lockdowns have had a devastating effect on graduating high school students who had planned to study abroad. According to a survey by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), a highly revered annual publication of global ranking for educational institutions, more than 48% of Indian students intending to study abroad changed their minds because of the COVID-19 outbreak. This study aims to discuss how the pandemic affected students' decision-making on a wide range of factors. The study's goals are to determine whether the coronavirus affected college students' plans to study abroad, including how it influenced the students' interest in pursuing their higher education and how factors such as financial breakdown, parental emotion, and fear of the pandemic have impacted students' intentions to study overseas. The research will collect and analyze primary data quantitatively to test the hypothesis and provide solid evidence for the goals. The study's findings reveal that students' perspectives differed, suggesting that some students considered deferring their overseas education plans in response to the worsening epidemic. In contrast, others embraced the option of studying online, either in India or Abroad (by enrolling in hybrid or roaster classes).Copyright © 2022, Anka Publishers. All rights reserved.

2.
Indian Journal of Community Health ; 35(1):99-102, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2324971

ABSTRACT

Background: Countries around the world are now racing to vaccinate people against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The Government of India also rolled out its vaccination drive from 16th January '2021. Aims: To estimate the antibody response of the COVID-19 vaccine in the form of SARS-COV-2 IgG antibodies in vaccinated healthcare workers.Methods: Prospective follow-up was study conducted on healthcare workers (HCWs) of a Medical college in Dehradun, Uttarakhand. Healthcare workers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 were tested for SARS-CoV-2-IgG antibodies at regular intervals i.e at 4 weeks after the 1st dose and then again at 4 weeks after the 2nd dose. The third sample was taken 6 months after the 2nd dose. Results: A total of 302 HCWs were enrolled in the study who gave their samples for IgG antibody estimation after the Covishield vaccine. After 4 weeks of completion of both doses, 96% HCWs formed SARS-COV-2 IgG antibodies, whereas 4% didn't. Then after 6 months of follow-up, 14% HCWs have become negative for antibodies and better immunity is seen in people who also got infected with COVID-19 during this time.Conclusion: This study concludes that the immunity gained after vaccination is waning off in around 6 months and there is a need for a booster dose, especially for people at high risk. The infection control practices still play a crucial role in the prevention of this deadly disease.

3.
Journal of Head & Neck Physicians and Surgeons ; 10(1):14-25, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2310587

ABSTRACT

The complex anatomy and exposure to various potential carcinogens lead to the development of tumors and tumor-like pathologies of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Delays in the diagnosis of sinonasal masses are common, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Often the radiologist is the first person to recognize a neoplasm in a suspected inflammatory condition. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a synergistic role in the assessment of pathologies in the sinonasal region, and their importance has become increasingly prevalent in the current scenario of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis. Besides, imaging is essential for mapping the exact extent of the pathology and delineating vascular supply of hypervascular masses, thus facilitating the operating surgeon and interventional radiologist in management. The cases presented in this article have been accrued over the past three decades and analyzed as a retrospective observational study, with clinical, radiological, and pathological data having been extracted from the existing database in the institution. We present the imaging spectrum of sinonasal masses in the pediatric and adult population, highlight the key radiological features of the common pathologies and discuss an imaging template for reporting these masses, with special focus on the surgically relevant points to be included in the report. The educational goal of this review is to explore a meticulous and systematic imaging approach toward soft tissue lesions in the sinonasal region, which would enable the radiologist to reach a diagnosis or point toward the possible etiology and nature of the lesions.

4.
European Respiratory Journal Conference: European Respiratory Society International Congress, ERS ; 60(Supplement 66), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2284752

ABSTRACT

Background: 49 patients underwent Lung Biopsy due to different indications and Post-COVID Pulmonary Fibrosis(PCPF) was suspected in 25 patients. Objective(s): To document the evidence of PCPF in patients with history of suspected COVID 19 infection (in past oneyear) through Transbronchial Lung Biopsy(TBLB)with flexible bronchoscopy. PFT and HRCT gave variedpresentation. Method(s): we have evaluated patients who underwent Lung Biopsy on flexible Bronchoscopy between 08/07/2021 till31/01/2022 at Metro Hospitals and Heath Institute, Meerut, UP, India. The history of exposure to COVID 19 infectionwas taken. Most of these patients underwent Echocardiography (ECHO) for Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF)and Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PAH), Pulmonary Function Test (PFT) and High Resolution CT Scan Chest (HRCTChest). Result(s): 49 patients underwent Lung Biopsy. 25 patients gave the history of exposure to COVID 19 infection with complaint of breathlessness and chest discomfort in the last 1 year. HRCT chest was suggestive of Atelectasis in 3 patients, Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) in 6, Fibrosis in 8, Pulmonary Nodules in 4 and HRCT was not done in 4 patients. PFT showed Mixed Ventilator Defect in 8, Obstructive in 3, Restrictive in 7, small airway disease in 1 and 6 patients couldn't perform PFT. PAH was normal for 6,mild for 16, moderate for 2 and 1 severe. 4 patients had Coronary Artery Disease. 2 patients had major complications like pneumothorax who underwent TBLB. Conclusion(s): PCPF was detected with the help of TBLB in the patients with history of exposure to COVID 19 infection. However, TBLB may cause major complication like pneumothorax seen in 8% cases.

5.
Environmental Quality Management ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2280926

ABSTRACT

Waste accumulation is a grave concern and becoming a transboundary challenge for environment. During Covid-19 pandemic, diverse type of waste were collected due to different practices employed in order to fight back the transmission rate of the virus. Covid-19 was proved to be capricious catastrophe of this 20th century and even not completely eradicated from the world. The havoc created by this imperceptible quick witted, pleomorphic deadly virus can't be ignored. Though a number of vaccines have been developed by the scientists but there is a fear of getting this virus again in our life. Medical studies prove that immunity drinks will help to reduce its reoccurrences. Coconut water is widely used among all drinks available globally. Its massive consumption created an incalculable pile of green coconut shells around the different corners of the world. This practice generating enormous problem of space acquisition for the environment. Both the environment and public health will benefit from an evaluation of quantity of coconut waste that is being thrown and its potential to generate value added products. With this context, present article has been planned to study different aspects like, coconut waste generation, its biological properties and environmental hazards associated with its accumulation. Additionally, this review illustrates, green technologies for production of different value added products from coconut waste. © 2023 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

7.
Journal of Head and Neck Physicians and Surgeons ; 10(1):14-25, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2090580

ABSTRACT

The complex anatomy and exposure to various potential carcinogens lead to the development of tumors and tumor-like pathologies of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Delays in the diagnosis of sinonasal masses are common, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Often the radiologist is the first person to recognize a neoplasm in a suspected inflammatory condition. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a synergistic role in the assessment of pathologies in the sinonasal region, and their importance has become increasingly prevalent in the current scenario of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis. Besides, imaging is essential for mapping the exact extent of the pathology and delineating vascular supply of hypervascular masses, thus facilitating the operating surgeon and interventional radiologist in management. The cases presented in this article have been accrued over the past three decades and analyzed as a retrospective observational study, with clinical, radiological, and pathological data having been extracted from the existing database in the institution. We present the imaging spectrum of sinonasal masses in the pediatric and adult population, highlight the key radiological features of the common pathologies and discuss an imaging template for reporting these masses, with special focus on the surgically relevant points to be included in the report. The educational goal of this review is to explore a meticulous and systematic imaging approach toward soft tissue lesions in the sinonasal region, which would enable the radiologist to reach a diagnosis or point toward the possible etiology and nature of the lesions. © 2022 Journal of Head and Neck Physicians and Surgeons Published by Wolters Kluwer-Medknow.

8.
Virtual Learning: Insights and Perspectives ; : 65-73, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2034201

ABSTRACT

Covid-19, the most deadly pandemic of this century, has impacted the entire world tremendously. It has unthinkable social, political and economic repercussions. Every person, whether child or adolescent, young or elderly, men or women, rich or poor or of any country whether developed or developing has been affected in one or the other way. The college students, preparing for their future, were taken aback by these sudden developments like all other humans. The uncertainty has deepened over their future. The studies have been affected a lot. In this testing time it is relevant to study the knowledge and perception of college students about this pandemic .What they think, feel, and behave moreover how they utilize their lockdown time, is important to study in order to take corrective and preventive measures. The biggest challenge is to keep them motivated and do not let them go in the state of depression and frustration. Students are impacted not only by the factors directly related to studies only but the impact on their families, families' income, sustainability, health condition etc. Uncertainly is prevalent everywhere. The study is based on the responses of the under graduate and post graduate students taken through online mode. In this study efforts have been made to collect data on various parameters regarding knowledge about Covid-19 symptoms, precautionary measures, mental state etc. © 2023 Contributors and Manakin Press. All rights reserved.

9.
Journal of SAFOG ; 14(4):440-444, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010444

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a global pandemic which undoubtedly hit the whole world so hard. There have been multiple waves across the globe of varying time, duration, and intensity, India has also witnessed two waves sweeping the entire nation. The second wave had startling intensity with massively increased oxygen requirement, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions. The effect was even more pronounced in the pregnant women as there was increased maternal morbidity and mortality. However, there are limited reports on the impact of COVID-19 during pregnancy. Objective: This study is aimed at highlighting the variance in clinical profile of pregnant patients in first and second wave of COVID-19 in India. Materials and methods: A retrospective observational comparative hospital-based study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi during the two waves of COVID-19. The first wave in India lasted from May 2020 to October 2020, and the second wave lasted from April 2021 to June 2021.We obtained the medical records and compiled clinical and outcome data for all pregnant patients, who were admitted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of our Hospital during the first and second wave of pandemic with a laboratory-confirmed report of SARS-CoV-2. Results and conclusion: The second wave definitely saw more number of symptomatic patients, an increase in symptom of shortness of breath, increase in oxygen requirement, ICU admissions, marginally increase lower segment cesarean section (LSCS) rates and associated comorbidity such as hypertensive disease of pregnancy.

10.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(7):DC22-DC25, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1979655

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Secondary infections are emerging as a serious threat among hospitalised patients of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Overuse of antibiotics and inadequate infection control practices due to COVID-19 patients' workload leads to a sudden upsurge of Multidrug Resistance (MDR) pathogens in healthcare settings attributing to higher mortality rates among the same. Aim: To detect the secondary infection rate among COVID-19 patients admitted to the hospital ward and Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and report the impact on antimicrobial resistance and patient outcome. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted for a period of three months of the second COVID-19 wave from 15(th) April 2021 to 14(th) july 2021 in the Department of Microbiology, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences (HIMS), Swami Rama Himalayan University (SRHU), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India. All clinical samples of Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) positive cases of COVID-19 received in the laboratory were cultured and identified using the Vitek-2 automated system and conventional fungal culture. Relevant demographic, characteristics, and clinical outcome data were obtained from records of the patient and recorded in reporting forms and were analysed for the study. Results were analysed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 and Microsoft Excel 2019. Results: Overall secondary infection rate of 135 (13.6%) was found among COVID-19 admitted patients. The most commonly isolated bacterial pathogens were Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species (18.52%) and Enterococcus species (8.89%). Whereas the most common fungal isolates were Candida species (20.75%) and Rhizopus (8.15%). In the present study, 60.5% of bacterial pathogens isolated were Multidrug-resistant Organisms (MDRO). Mortality among COVID-19 patients with secondary infection was reported as 53% which was higher than the overall mortality rate of 36% in the same. Conclusion: A high secondary infection rate, MDRO isolation rate, and high mortality among COVID-19 with secondary infection were reported. This shows the urgent need for reinforcement of infection control practices and strict antimicrobial stewardship policies.

11.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International ; 33(57B):78-88, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1614274

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine, also known as telehealth, has been around for decades, but despite its many perceived benefits, its adoption has remained low. The objective our study was to know how consumers felt about telemedicine service during COVID -19 and to find out factors influencing consumers' perceptions of telemedicine services, a survey was done using a questionnaire. Social media and e-mail were used to inform people about the research due to onset of pandemic. An e online survey was done from the period of April 1st to June 30th, 2021 in India's capital Delhi and adjoining areas, 122 service users were sampled for the survey. A 10-item scale was used to assess telemedicine satisfaction, revealing that all participants were satisfied with their telemedicine experience(s) in general. The elements of perception were studied using factor analysis. The results of the analysis revealed that an individual's intention to utilize a system or technology may be influenced not only by factors affecting the user's direct encounter with the system or technology but also by factors affecting the service provider. Patients place a high value on these qualities, thus service providers can design their interface, appointment procedure, and consultation process around them.

12.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; de Sousa, D. A.; Demeestere, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Ben Sassi, S.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z. B.; Bai, F. H.; Duan, Z. H.; Hao, Y. G.; Huang, W. G.; Li, G. W.; Li, W.; Liu, G. Z.; Luo, J.; Shang, X. J.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H. B.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y. Y.; Yuan, Z. Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W. L.; Zi, W. J.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Tokuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayeva, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Bin Basri, H.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, Wnnw, Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Al Hashmi, A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykac, O.; Ozdemir, A. O.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; De Blauwe, S.; Van Hooren, G.; De Raedt, S.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M. R.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Vaclavik, D.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Ondze, B.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Ringleb, P. A.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbell, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; de Lecina, M. A.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; Mackey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; Macdougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Ramakrishnan, P.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I. P.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H. N.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Cardoso, F. B.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'Alverne, F.; Moises, D.; Iman, B.; Magalhaes, P.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Rogoziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; van den Wijngaard, I.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J. Y.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, G.; Horev, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Vasquez, A. R.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15):42, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576349
13.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; Sousa, D. A.; Demeester, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Sassi, S. B.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z.; Bai, F.; Duan, Z.; Hao, Y.; Huang, W.; Li, G.; Li, W.; Liu, G.; Luo, J.; Shang, X.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Zi, W.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Kuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayev, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Basr, H. B.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, W. N. W.; Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Hashmi, A. A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykaç, O.; Özdemir, A.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; Deblauwe, S.; Hooren, G. V.; Raedt, S. D.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. 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S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Rodriguezvasquez, A.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1407898

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objectives of this study were to measure the global impact of the pandemic on the volumes for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with two control 4-month periods. Background: The COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread repercussions on the delivery of health care worldwide. Design/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by ICD-10 codes and/or classifications in stroke center databases. Results: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95%CI,-11.7 to-11.3, p<0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95%CI,-13.8 to-12.7, p<0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95%CI,-13.7 to-10.3, p=0.001). There were greater declines in primary compared to comprehensive stroke centers (CSC) for stroke hospitalizations (-17.3% vs-10.3%, p<0.0001) and IVT (-15.5% vs-12.6%, p=0.0001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95%CI 9.2-9.8, p<0.0001) was noted over the two later (May, June) versus the two earlier (March, April) months of the pandemic, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalization volume, high volume stroke center, and CSC. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. SARS-CoV-2 infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalizations, high volume stroke centers, and CSCs.

14.
Proceedings of the 2020 5th International Conference on Computing, Communication and Security ; 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1271166

ABSTRACT

Worldwide governments have decided to temporarily closures of educational institutions in an attempt to minimize the spread of the COVID-19 Pandemic, which has forged significant challenges for the education community. The present study is from the digital education scenario during the COVID-19 lockdown to find out the factors affecting online learning. This study is exploratory from 1218 students who have been collected based on a structured questionnaire having a 5-point linear scale. Jamovl software has been used for data analysis and results demonstrate that there are three major factors like affordability, infrastructural, and training that affect online learning during the COVID-19. Besides, correlation analysis between these factors highlights the relationship among them. Linear regression has applied to know the impact of affordability and infrastructure on the training factor. Outcomes suggested that infrastructure has a negative impact but affordability has a positive impact on the training factor. In the present scenario, this study highlighted the importance of social distancing and digital education tools that should he adopted by schools and colleges.

15.
Mathematical Engineering ; : 253-272, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1184633

ABSTRACT

Epidemic diseases are well known to be fatal and cause great loss worldwide—economically, socially and mentally. Even after around nine months, since the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) began to spread, people are getting infected all over the world. This is one of the areas where human medical advancements fail because by the time the disease is identified and its treatment is figured out, most of the population is already exposed to it. In such cases, it becomes easier to take steps if the dynamics of the disease and its sensitivity to various factors is known. This chapter deals with developing a mathematical model for the spread of Coronavirus disease, by employing a number of parameters that affect its spread. A compartmental modelling approach using ordinary differential equation has been used to formulate the set of equations that describe the model. We have used the next generation matrix method to find the basic reproduction number of the system and proved that the system is locally asymptotically stable at the disease-free equilibrium for R0&lt;1. Stability and existence of endemic equilibrium have been discussed, followed by sensitivity of infective classes to parameters like proportion of vaccinated individuals and precautionary measures like social distancing. It is expected that after the vaccine is developed and is available to use, as the proportion of vaccinated individuals will increase, the infection will decrease in the population which can gradually lead to herd immunity. Since, the vaccine is still under development, non-intervention measures play a major role in coping with the disease. The disease generally transmits when the water droplets from an infected individuals’ mouth or nose are inhaled by a healthy individual. The best measures that should be adopted are social distancing, washing one’s hands frequently, and covering one’s mouth with mask, quarantine and lockdowns. Thus, as more and more precautionary measures are taken, it would gradually reduce the infection which has also been proved numerically by the sensitivity analysis of ‘w’ in our dynamical analysis. © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

16.
Mathematical Engineering ; : 77-100, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1184625

ABSTRACT

The treatment of corona virus disease is not possible without any vaccine. However, spreading of the deadly virus can be controlled by various measures being imposed by Government like lockdown, quarantine, isolation, contact tracing, social distancing and putting face mask on mandatory basis. As per information from the Department of Medical Health and Family Welfare of Rajasthan on 19 September 2020, corona virus COVID-19 severely affected the state of Rajasthan, resulting in cumulative positive cases 113,124, cumulative recovered 93,805 and cumulative deaths 1322. Without any appropriate treatment, it may further spread globally as it is highly communicable and because potentially affecting the human body respiratory system, which could be fatal to mankind. Therefore, to reduce the spread of infection, authors are motivated to construct a predictive mathematical model with sustainable conditions as per the ongoing scenario in the state of Rajasthan. Mathematica software has been used for numerical evaluation and graphical representation for variation of infection, recovery, exposed, susceptibles and mortality versus time. Moreover, comparative analysis of results obtained by predictive mathematical model has been done with the exact data plotting by curve fitting as obtained from Rajasthan government website. As a part of analysis and result, it is noted that due to the variation of transmission rate from person to person corresponding rate of infection goes on increasing monthly and mortality rate found high as shown and discussed numerically. Further, we can predict that the situation will become worse in the winter months especially in month of December due to unavailability of proper vaccine. This model may become more efficient when the researchers, experts from medical sciences and technologist work together. © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

17.
Journal of Content, Community and Communication ; 12:198-209, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1061301

ABSTRACT

This study highlights the role of utilitarian shopping, hedonic shopping, and online advertisement on cognitive dissonance. Impulse Buying plays a role as a mediator in this research. The objective of this research is to investigate how utilitarian shopping value, hedonic shopping value, and online advertising influence the cognitive dissonance of customers. 338 response data have been collected from consumers involved in fashion apparel;respondents are majorly from central zone of India. Partial least square (PLS) - Structural equation modelling (SEM) is implemented using Smart PLS 3.0. The simulation result shows that utilitarian shopping value, hedonic shopping value, and online ads are found to be important in predicting cognitive dissonance and impulse buying, whereas impulse buying is impeccable in terms of predicting positive relationships with cognitive dissonance. Moreover, Impulse buying is playing as positive mediating effect in relation with constructs. Hence, this research suggests that a complex representation which may better understanding about consumer shopping behaviour. Conclusively, this research’s major contribution towards authors’ knowledge, and help the marketing expert to focus on important parameter of consumer buying behaviour. © 2020. All Rights Reserved.

18.
EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology ; 6(22):1-9, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-823568

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 is the latest virus responsible for an outburst of a unique respiratory infection identified as COVID-19. The virus popularly known as Corona Virus has spread quickly in recent days from China to several other countries around the world. Health is always of prime concern for mankind. Computing is playing an important role in improving the current state of the healthcare industry. OBJECTIVES: This paper focuses on summarizing the happenings about the coronavirus and the disease spread. This review study concentrates on the history of the virus, its technical details, the disease caused by the virus, its symptoms and precautions. The study also tries to develop an understanding of the role of technology in dealing with the outbreak, its impact in diverse fields, and the current state of the pandemic. METHODS: This work is an attempt towards presenting a perspective of computing and technology in fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: This work presents a perspective showing technology in healthcare as a rescuer in such situations. In this survey, we simply discuss SARS-COV2 and COVID-19 from different perspectives in order to serve as a quick reference for the readers and to achieve a better insight into the fast-evolving pandemic. CONCLUSION: Social distancing, staying home and lockdowns are some known solutions to combat the pandemic in the absence of the vaccine, and technology can play a significant role in combating the pandemic. © 2020 Sunil Chawla et al., licensed to EAI.

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