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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 790334, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715001

ABSTRACT

The capacity of pre-existing immunity to human common coronaviruses (HCoV) to cross-protect against de novo COVID-19is yet unknown. In this work, we studied the sera of 175 COVID-19 patients, 76 healthy donors and 3 intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) batches. We found that most COVID-19 patients developed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies before IgM. Moreover, the capacity of their IgGs to react to beta-HCoV, was present in the early sera of most patients before the appearance of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG. This implied that a recall-type antibody response was generated. In comparison, the patients that mounted an anti-SARS-COV2 IgM response, prior to IgG responses had lower titres of anti-beta-HCoV IgG antibodies. This indicated that pre-existing immunity to beta-HCoV was conducive to the generation of memory type responses to SARS-COV-2. Finally, we also found that pre-COVID-19-era sera and IVIG cross-reacted with SARS-CoV-2 antigens without neutralising SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in vitro. Put together, these results indicate that whilst pre-existing immunity to HCoV is responsible for recall-type IgG responses to SARS-CoV-2, it does not lead to cross-protection against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , Common Cold/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Immunity, Heterologous , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Immunoglobulin M/metabolism , Immunologic Memory , Male , Middle Aged , Survival Analysis
2.
Cancer Discov ; 12(4): 958-983, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706860

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) relies on the in-depth understanding of protective immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). We characterized the polarity and specificity of memory T cells directed against SARS-CoV-2 viral lysates and peptides to determine correlates with spontaneous, virus-elicited, or vaccine-induced protection against COVID-19 in disease-free and cancer-bearing individuals. A disbalance between type 1 and 2 cytokine release was associated with high susceptibility to COVID-19. Individuals susceptible to infection exhibited a specific deficit in the T helper 1/T cytotoxic 1 (Th1/Tc1) peptide repertoire affecting the receptor binding domain of the spike protein (S1-RBD), a hotspot of viral mutations. Current vaccines triggered Th1/Tc1 responses in only a fraction of all subject categories, more effectively against the original sequence of S1-RBD than that from viral variants. We speculate that the next generation of vaccines should elicit Th1/Tc1 T-cell responses against the S1-RBD domain of emerging viral variants. SIGNIFICANCE: This study prospectively analyzed virus-specific T-cell correlates of protection against COVID-19 in healthy and cancer-bearing individuals. A disbalance between Th1/Th2 recall responses conferred susceptibility to COVID-19 in both populations, coinciding with selective defects in Th1 recognition of the receptor binding domain of spike. See related commentary by McGary and Vardhana, p. 892. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 873.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , T-Lymphocytes , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
3.
JCI Insight ; 6(18)2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467778

ABSTRACT

The importance of the adaptive T cell response in the control and resolution of viral infection has been well established. However, the nature of T cell-mediated viral control mechanisms in life-threatening stages of COVID-19 has yet to be determined. The aim of the present study was to determine the function and phenotype of T cell populations associated with survival or death of patients with COVID-19 in intensive care as a result of phenotypic and functional profiling by mass cytometry. Increased frequencies of circulating, polyfunctional CD4+CXCR5+HLA-DR+ stem cell memory T cells (Tscms) and decreased proportions of granzyme B-expressing and perforin-expressing effector memory T cells were detected in recovered and deceased patients, respectively. The higher abundance of polyfunctional PD-L1+CXCR3+CD8+ effector T cells (Teffs), CXCR5+HLA-DR+ Tscms, and anti-nucleocapsid (anti-NC) cytokine-producing T cells permitted us to differentiate between recovered and deceased patients. The results from a principal component analysis show an imbalance in the T cell compartment that allowed for the separation of recovered and deceased patients. The paucity of circulating PD-L1+CXCR3+CD8+ Teffs and NC-specific CD8+ T cells accurately forecasts fatal disease outcome. This study provides insight into the nature of the T cell populations involved in the control of COVID-19 and therefore might impact T cell-based vaccine designs for this infectious disease.


Subject(s)
B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8 Antigens/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Receptors, CXCR3/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 752612, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456293

ABSTRACT

Background: Lymphopenia and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio may have prognostic value in COVID-19 severity. Objective: We investigated neutrophil subsets and functions in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of COVID-19 patients on the basis of patients' clinical characteristics. Methods: We used a multiparametric cytometry profiling based to mature and immature neutrophil markers in 146 critical or severe COVID-19 patients. Results: The Discovery study (38 patients, first pandemic wave) showed that 80% of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients develop strong myelemia with CD10-CD64+ immature neutrophils (ImNs). Cellular profiling revealed three distinct neutrophil subsets expressing either the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), the interleukin-3 receptor alpha (CD123), or programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) overrepresented in ICU patients compared to non-ICU patients. The proportion of LOX-1- or CD123-expressing ImNs is positively correlated with clinical severity, cytokine storm (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and thrombosis. BALs of patients with ARDS were highly enriched in LOX-1-expressing ImN subsets and in antimicrobial neutrophil factors. A validation study (118 patients, second pandemic wave) confirmed and strengthened the association of the proportion of ImN subsets with disease severity, invasive ventilation, and death. Only high proportions of LOX-1-expressing ImNs remained strongly associated with a high risk of severe thrombosis independently of the plasma antimicrobial neutrophil factors, suggesting an independent association of ImN markers with their functions. Conclusion: LOX-1-expressing ImNs may help identifying COVID-19 patients at high risk of severity and thrombosis complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/genetics , Thrombosis/etiology , Adult , Aged , B7-H1 Antigen/genetics , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/immunology , Interleukin-8/genetics , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/immunology , Thrombosis/genetics , Thrombosis/immunology
5.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(4): 575-583, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to evaluate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and SARS-CoV-2-specific immune responses after BNT162b2 vaccination. METHODS: In this prospective study, disease activity and clinical assessments were recorded from the first dose of vaccine until day 15 after the second dose in 126 patients with SLE. SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses were measured against wild-type spike antigen, while serum-neutralising activity was assessed against the SARS-CoV-2 historical strain and variants of concerns (VOCs). Vaccine-specific T cell responses were quantified by interferon-γ release assay after the second dose. RESULTS: BNT162b2 was well tolerated and no statistically significant variations of BILAG (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group) and SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index) scores were observed throughout the study in patients with SLE with active and inactive disease at baseline. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and methotrexate (MTX) treatments were associated with drastically reduced BNT162b2 antibody response (ß=-78, p=0.007; ß=-122, p<0.001, respectively). Anti-spike antibody response was positively associated with baseline total immunoglobulin G serum levels, naïve B cell frequencies (ß=2, p=0.018; ß=2.5, p=0.003) and SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell response (r=0.462, p=0.003). In responders, serum neutralisation activity decreased against VOCs bearing the E484K mutation but remained detectable in a majority of patients. CONCLUSION: MMF, MTX and poor baseline humoral immune status, particularly low naïve B cell frequencies, are independently associated with impaired BNT162b2 mRNA antibody response, delineating patients with SLE who might need adapted vaccine regimens and follow-up.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antirheumatic Agents/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/drug effects , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/virology , Male , Methotrexate/adverse effects , Methotrexate/immunology , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Mycophenolic Acid/immunology , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(577)2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963895

ABSTRACT

Humoral immune responses are typically characterized by primary IgM antibody responses followed by secondary antibody responses associated with immune memory and composed of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Here, we measured acute humoral responses to SARS-CoV-2, including the frequency of antibody-secreting cells and the presence of SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies in the serum, saliva, and bronchoalveolar fluid of 159 patients with COVID-19. Early SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral responses were dominated by IgA antibodies. Peripheral expansion of IgA plasmablasts with mucosal homing potential was detected shortly after the onset of symptoms and peaked during the third week of the disease. The virus-specific antibody responses included IgG, IgM, and IgA, but IgA contributed to virus neutralization to a greater extent compared with IgG. Specific IgA serum concentrations decreased notably 1 month after the onset of symptoms, but neutralizing IgA remained detectable in saliva for a longer time (days 49 to 73 post-symptoms). These results represent a critical observation given the emerging information as to the types of antibodies associated with optimal protection against reinfection and whether vaccine regimens should consider targeting a potent but potentially short-lived IgA response.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin A/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Saliva/immunology , Saliva/virology , Time Factors
7.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(4): 691-697, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840632

ABSTRACT

Anecdotal evidence rapidly accumulated during March 2020 from sites around the world that sudden hyposmia and hypogeusia are significant symptoms associated with the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Our objective was to describe the prevalence of hyposmia and hypogeusia and compare it in hospitalized and non-hospitalized COVID-19 patients to evaluate an association of these symptoms with disease severity. We performed a cross-sectional survey during 5 consecutive days in March 2020, within a tertiary referral center, associated outpatient clinic, and two primary care outpatient facilities in Paris. All SARS-CoV-2-positive patients hospitalized during the study period and able to be interviewed (n = 198), hospital outpatients seen during the previous month (n = 129), and all COVID-19-highly suspect patients in two primary health centers (n = 63) were included. Hospitalized patients were significantly more often male (64 vs 40%) and older (66 vs 43 years old in median) and had significantly more comorbidities than outpatients. Hyposmia and hypogeusia were reported by 33% of patients and occurred significantly less frequently in hospitalized patients (12% and 13%, respectively) than in the health centers' outpatients (33% and 43%, respectively) and in the hospital outpatients (65% and 60%, respectively). Hyposmia and hypogeusia appeared more frequently after other COVID-19 symptoms. Patients with hyposmia and/or hypogeusia were significantly younger and had significantly less respiratory severity criteria than patients without these symptoms. Olfactory and gustatory dysfunction occurs frequently in COVID-19, especially in young, non-severe patients. These symptoms might be a useful tool for initial diagnostic work-up in patients with suspected COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Ageusia/physiopathology , Ambulatory Care , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Prevalence , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
8.
C R Biol ; 343(1): 33-39, 2020 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-677826

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 epidemics raises a considerable issue of public health at the planetary scale. There is a pressing urgency to find treatments based upon currently available scientific knowledge. Therefore, we tentatively propose a hypothesis which hopefully might ultimately help save lives. Based on the current scientific literature and on new epidemiological data which reveal that current smoking status appears to be a protective factor against the infection by SARS-CoV-2 [1], we hypothesize that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of Covid-19 infection and might represent a target for the prevention and control of Covid-19 infection.


L'épidémie de SARS-Cov-2 pose un problème considérable de santé publique à l'échelle planétaire. Il y a urgence extrême de découvrir des traitements qui se fondent sur les connaissances scientifiques disponibles. Nous proposons donc une hypothèse plausible mais provisoire qui puisse le moment venu contribuer à sauver des vies. Elle se fonde sur la littérature scientifique disponible et sur des données épidémiologiques nouvelles qui révèlent que le statut de fumeur parait être un facteur de protection contre l'infection par SARS-Cov-2 [1]. Nous proposons l'hypothèse que le récepteur nicotinique de l'acétylcholine (nAChR) joue un rôle critique dans la pathophysiologie de l'infection Covid-19 et puisse représenter une cible pour la prévention et le contrôle de l'infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Nicotine/therapeutic use , Nicotinic Agonists/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Receptors, Nicotinic , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Smoking , Transdermal Patch
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