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1.
Annals of gastroenterological surgery ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2058196

ABSTRACT

Aim Due to the overwhelming spread of SARS‐CoV‐2 and its disruption of the healthcare system, delays and reduced numbers were reported for colorectal cancer screening, colonoscopies, and surgery during the COVID‐19 pandemic. This multicenter retrospective study investigated the still poorly understood impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on colorectal cancer treatment in Japan. Methods This study was organized by the Clinical Study Group of Osaka University, which comprised 32 major institutions in Osaka. We retrospectively analyzed the number of surgeries and colonoscopies performed and the characteristics of patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between March 2019 and February 2021. We compared data collected before and during the COVID‐19 pandemic. We also assessed the methods used for detecting colorectal cancer, including fecal occult blood test, abdominal symptoms, and anemia. Results The COVID‐19 pandemic caused reductions in the annual numbers of surgeries (3569 vs 3198) and colonoscopies (67 622 vs 58 183) performed in the 2020 fiscal year, compared to the 2019 fiscal year. During the COVID‐19 pandemic, a significantly lower proportion of patients were treated for clinical stages ≤I (24.2% vs 26.9%;P = .011), compared to the proportion treated before the pandemic. Fecal occult blood tests for detecting colorectal cancer were used significantly less frequently during the COVID‐19 pandemic (26.2% vs 29.6%;P = .002). These trends were more significant in larger institutions. Conclusion The COVID‐19 pandemic reduced the number of colonoscopies and surgeries performed for colorectal cancer and hindered the detection of asymptomatic early‐stage cancers, and its impact varied by hospital size. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on colorectal cancer treatment in Japan, that was not fully understood. The COVID‐19 pandemic has reduced the number of colonoscopies and surgeries for colorectal cancer and hindered the detection of asymptomatic early‐stage cancers. " cd_value_code="text

2.
Ann Gastroenterol Surg ; 2022 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2003587

ABSTRACT

Aim: Due to the overwhelming spread of SARS-CoV-2 and its disruption of the healthcare system, delays and reduced numbers were reported for colorectal cancer screening, colonoscopies, and surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. This multicenter retrospective study investigated the still poorly understood impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on colorectal cancer treatment in Japan. Methods: This study was organized by the Clinical Study Group of Osaka University, which comprised 32 major institutions in Osaka. We retrospectively analyzed the number of surgeries and colonoscopies performed and the characteristics of patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between March 2019 and February 2021. We compared data collected before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also assessed the methods used for detecting colorectal cancer, including fecal occult blood test, abdominal symptoms, and anemia. Results: The COVID-19 pandemic caused reductions in the annual numbers of surgeries (3569 vs 3198) and colonoscopies (67 622 vs 58 183) performed in the 2020 fiscal year, compared to the 2019 fiscal year. During the COVID-19 pandemic, a significantly lower proportion of patients were treated for clinical stages ≤I (24.2% vs 26.9%; P = .011), compared to the proportion treated before the pandemic. Fecal occult blood tests for detecting colorectal cancer were used significantly less frequently during the COVID-19 pandemic (26.2% vs 29.6%; P = .002). These trends were more significant in larger institutions. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic reduced the number of colonoscopies and surgeries performed for colorectal cancer and hindered the detection of asymptomatic early-stage cancers, and its impact varied by hospital size.

3.
Cancer Sci ; 113(4): 1531-1534, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779205

ABSTRACT

According to the current international guidelines, high-risk patients diagnosed with pathological T1 (pT1) colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent complete local resection but may have risk of developing lymph node metastasis (LNM) are recommended additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection. However, around 90% of the patients without LNM are exposed to the risk of being overtreated due to the insufficient pathological criteria for risk stratification of LNM. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a noninvasive biomarker for molecular residual disease and relapse detection after treatments including surgical and endoscopic resection of solid tumors. The CIRCULATE-Japan project includes a large-scale patient-screening registry of the GALAXY study to track ctDNA status of patients with stage II to IV or recurrent CRC that can be completely resected. Based on the CIRCULATE-Japan platform, we launched DENEB, a new prospective study, within the GALAXY study for patients with pT1 CRC who underwent complete local resection and were scheduled for additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection based on the standard pathologic risk stratification criteria for LNM. The aim of this study is to explore the ability of predicting LNM using ctDNA analysis compared with the standard pathological criteria. The ctDNA assay will build new evidence to establish a noninvasive personalized diagnosis in patients, which will facilitate tailored/optimal treatment strategies for CRC patients.


Subject(s)
Circulating Tumor DNA , Colorectal Neoplasms , Circulating Tumor DNA/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Liquid Biopsy , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphatic Metastasis/pathology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
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