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1.
Healthcare ; 10(5):853, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1820227

ABSTRACT

Background: With the help of vaccines, the world has witnessed a substantial decrease and even the eradication of many infectious diseases. Many factors influenced the public's acceptance and compliance with the COVID-19 vaccine. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire link was distributed through social media platforms. The questionnaire tool assessed the participants' general knowledge and the barriers to taking the COVID-19 vaccine. All people who are currently living in Saudi Arabia and are at least 16 years old were included in the study and formed the study population. Based on our inclusion criteria, a total of 2,198 individuals were enrolled in this study. Results: Participants who were willing to take the vaccine were 68%. After vaccination, 10% of the participants think they can stop wearing face masks and washing their hands. Two-thirds of the participants think that the vaccine is effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. A total of 44.0% of the participants were afraid of the vaccine. The most common reasons were fear of unknown side effects (53.9%) and believing that the vaccine was not tested enough (27%). More than half of the study participants had a preference for receiving the Pfizer vaccine (52%). Conclusion: The public's acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine in Saudi Arabia is insufficient. Unknown side effects, widespread misconceptions, and a lack of adequate safety trials are all important reasons for concern among Saudis. More educational materials and awareness efforts will help to alleviate the fear that surrounds it. This will boost the vaccine's acceptance rate in the long run.

2.
Journal of Medical Virology ; 12:12, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1802442

ABSTRACT

Malaria and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) share several characteristics that could lead to cross-infection, particularly in malaria-endemic areas. Early COVID-19 symptoms might be misdiagnosed for malaria in clinical settings. Also, both diseases can cause fatal complications. So, laboratory testing for both diseases was recommended by the World Health Organization. To study the clinical characteristics and outcomes of Adult Sudanese patients with COVID-19 and malaria coinfection. This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2021 to October 2021 in Wad Medani. Total coverage of all Sudanese patients above 18 years old with a confirmed diagnosis of coinfection with COVID-19 and malaria was included, and data were collected using a data collection sheet. Data were analyzed using R software version 4.0.2. Data were described and presented as mean, standard deviation, and number (percentage). To find associated factors with in-hospital outcome, chi2 test, fisher exact test, and independent t test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used. In this study, 156 participants were diagnosed with COVID-19 and malaria coinfection. Most of them were between 60 and 70 years (30.8%), the majority were males (59%). Shortness of breath (76.3%) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (35.3%) were the most common symptom and complications among coinfected patients, respectively. Ground glass opacity (n = 47/49, 95.9%) is the most common result for computed tomography scan. Atrial fibrillation was the most common abnormal electrocardiogram finding (n = 6/62, 9.7%). Overall mortality among all participants was (63/156, 40.4%). High mortality rate was found among the coinfected patients. More attention is needed towards fighting COVID-19 and malaria coinfection. There may be a link between malaria and COVID-19.

3.
Brain & Behavior ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1802075

ABSTRACT

Background Objectives Methodology Results Conclusion Several investigations were carried out during the pandemic, demonstrating a number of neurological symptoms linked to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) infection.The goal of this review is to discuss COVID‐19 disease's neurological signs and squeals.From December 2019 to May 2020, data were retrieved from PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect, as well as a manual search using Google Scholar. COVID‐19, neurological symptoms, cranial nerves, motor system were among the key phrases utilized in the search.The intensity of respiratory involvement increases the likelihood of neurological symptoms and consequences. According to some research, it might range from 34% to 80%. The central and peripheral neural systems are both affected, resulting in cranial nerve palsies and limb paralysis.COVID‐19 neurologic complications are key drivers of patient severity and mortality. Headache, convulsions, mental and psychic disorders, delirium, and insomnia are just some of the symptoms that the virus can cause. The olfactory nerve is the most commonly damaged cranial nerve, resulting in anosmia. Stroke (mostly infarction), encephalitis, meningitis, Guillain–Barre syndrome, relapse of multiple sclerosis, and transverse myelitis are all symptoms and squeals. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Brain & Behavior is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

4.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-333080

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background: COVID-19 impacts the cardiovascular system resulting in myocardial damage and also affects the kidneys leading to renal dysfunction. This effect is mostly through the binding with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and Neuropilin-1(NRP-l) receptors. Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) typically combine with microbial pathogens and provoke an inflammatory response. Aim: This work aims to compare the changes in kidney and heart function bioindicators and expressions of TLRs (TLR2 and TLR2) as well as ACE2 and NRP-l receptors in moderate and severe COVID-19 patients. The correlations between kidney and heart function bioindicators and expressions of these receptors are also studied. Patients and Methods: In this study, 50 healthy control and 100 COVID-19 patients (55 male and 45 female) were enrolled. According to WHO guidelines, these participants were divided into severe (50 cases) and moderate (50 cases). Serum creatinine, blood urea, CKMB, LDH, and Troponin I were estimated. We measured the gene expression for Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4), ACE2, and NRP-1 in the blood samples using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT -PCR). Results: In comparison with the healthy group, all patients exhibited a significant elevation in serum creatinine, blood urea, cardiac enzymes, and CRP. As well, all studied patients revealed a significant elevation in the expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA. In all patients, CKMB, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA expression levels were positively correlated to both TLR2 and TLR4 expression levels. Moreover, serum creatinine and blood urea were positively correlated to both TLR2 and TLR 4 expression levels in the severe group only. Conclusions: Our study concluded that expression levels for TLR2, TLR4, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA in both severe and moderate patients were positively correlated with renal biomarkers and cardiac enzymes. Innate immune markers can be important because they correlate with the severity of illness in COVID-19.

5.
Houriiyah Tegally; James E. San; Matthew Cotten; Bryan Tegomoh; Gerald Mboowa; Darren P. Martin; Cheryl Baxter; Monika Moir; Arnold Lambisia; Amadou Diallo; Daniel G. Amoako; Moussa M. Diagne; Abay Sisay; Abdel-Rahman N. Zekri; Abdelhamid Barakat; Abdou Salam Gueye; Abdoul K. Sangare; Abdoul-Salam Ouedraogo; Abdourahmane SOW; Abdualmoniem O. Musa; Abdul K. Sesay; Adamou LAGARE; Adedotun-Sulaiman Kemi; Aden Elmi Abar; Adeniji A. Johnson; Adeola Fowotade; Adewumi M. Olubusuyi; Adeyemi O. Oluwapelumi; Adrienne A. Amuri; Agnes Juru; Ahmad Mabrouk Ramadan; Ahmed Kandeil; Ahmed Mostafa; Ahmed Rebai; Ahmed Sayed; Akano Kazeem; Aladje Balde; Alan Christoffels; Alexander J. Trotter; Allan Campbell; Alpha Kabinet KEITA; Amadou Kone; Amal Bouzid; Amal Souissi; Ambrose Agweyu; Ana V. Gutierrez; Andrew J. Page; Anges Yadouleton; Anika Vinze; Anise N. Happi; Anissa Chouikha; Arash Iranzadeh; Arisha Maharaj; Armel Landry Batchi-Bouyou; Arshad Ismail; Augustina Sylverken; Augustine Goba; Ayoade Femi; Ayotunde Elijah Sijuwola; Azeddine Ibrahimi; Baba Marycelin; Babatunde Lawal Salako; Bamidele S. Oderinde; Bankole Bolajoko; Beatrice Dhaala; Belinda L. Herring; Benjamin Tsofa; Bernard Mvula; Berthe-Marie Njanpop-Lafourcade; Blessing T. Marondera; Bouh Abdi KHAIREH; Bourema Kouriba; Bright Adu; Brigitte Pool; Bronwyn McInnis; Cara Brook; Carolyn Williamson; Catherine Anscombe; Catherine B. Pratt; Cathrine Scheepers; Chantal G. Akoua-Koffi; Charles N. Agoti; Cheikh Loucoubar; Chika Kingsley Onwuamah; Chikwe Ihekweazu; Christian Noel MALAKA; Christophe Peyrefitte; Chukwuma Ewean Omoruyi; Clotaire Donatien Rafai; Collins M. Morang'a; D. James Nokes; Daniel Bugembe Lule; Daniel J. Bridges; Daniel Mukadi-Bamuleka; Danny Park; David Baker; Deelan Doolabh; Deogratius Ssemwanga; Derek Tshiabuila; Diarra Bassirou; Dominic S.Y. Amuzu; Dominique Goedhals; Donald S. Grant; Donwilliams O. Omuoyo; Dorcas Maruapula; Dorcas Waruguru Wanjohi; Ebenezer Foster-Nyarko; Eddy K. Lusamaki; Edgar Simulundu; Edidah M. Ong'era; Edith N. Ngabana; Edward O. Abworo; Edward Otieno; Edwin Shumba; Edwine Barasa; EL BARA AHMED; Elmostafa EL FAHIME; Emmanuel Lokilo; Enatha Mukantwari; Erameh Cyril; Eromon Philomena; Essia Belarbi; Etienne Simon-Loriere; Etile A. Anoh; Fabian Leendertz; Fahn M. Taweh; Fares Wasfi; Fatma Abdelmoula; Faustinos T. Takawira; Fawzi Derrar; Fehintola V Ajogbasile; Florette Treurnicht; Folarin Onikepe; Francine Ntoumi; Francisca M. Muyembe; FRANCISCO NGIAMBUDULU; Frank Edgard ZONGO Ragomzingba; Fred Athanasius DRATIBI; Fred-Akintunwa Iyanu; Gabriel K. Mbunsu; Gaetan Thilliez; Gemma L. Kay; George O. Akpede; George E Uwem; Gert van Zyl; Gordon A. Awandare; Grit Schubert; Gugu P. Maphalala; Hafaliana C. Ranaivoson; Hajar Lemriss; Hannah E Omunakwe; Harris Onywera; Haruka Abe; HELA KARRAY; Hellen Nansumba; Henda Triki; Herve Alberic ADJE KADJO; Hesham Elgahzaly; Hlanai Gumbo; HOTA mathieu; Hugo Kavunga-Membo; Ibtihel Smeti; Idowu B. Olawoye; Ifedayo Adetifa; Ikponmwosa Odia; Ilhem Boutiba-Ben Boubaker; Isaac Ssewanyana; Isatta Wurie; Iyaloo S Konstantinus; Jacqueline Wemboo Afiwa Halatoko; James Ayei; Janaki Sonoo; Jean Bernard LEKANA-DOUKI; Jean-Claude C. Makangara; Jean-Jacques M. Tamfum; Jean-Michel Heraud; Jeffrey G. Shaffer; Jennifer Giandhari; Jennifer Musyoki; Jessica N. Uwanibe; Jinal N. Bhiman; Jiro Yasuda; Joana Morais; Joana Q. Mends; Jocelyn Kiconco; John Demby Sandi; John Huddleston; John Kofi Odoom; John M. Morobe; John O. Gyapong; John T. Kayiwa; Johnson C. Okolie; Joicymara Santos Xavier; Jones Gyamfi; Joseph Humphrey Kofi Bonney; Joseph Nyandwi; Josie Everatt; Jouali Farah; Joweria Nakaseegu; Joyce M. Ngoi; Joyce Namulondo; Judith U. Oguzie; Julia C. Andeko; Julius J. Lutwama; Justin O'Grady; Katherine J Siddle; Kathleen Victoir; Kayode T. Adeyemi; Kefentse A. Tumedi; Kevin Sanders Carvalho; Khadija Said Mohammed; Kunda G. Musonda; Kwabena O. Duedu; Lahcen Belyamani; Lamia Fki-Berrajah; Lavanya Singh; Leon Biscornet; Leonardo de Oliveira Martins; Lucious Chabuka; Luicer Olubayo; Lul Lojok Deng; Lynette Isabella Ochola-Oyier; Madisa Mine; Magalutcheemee Ramuth; Maha Mastouri; Mahmoud ElHefnawi; Maimouna Mbanne; Maitshwarelo I. Matsheka; Malebogo Kebabonye; Mamadou Diop; Mambu Momoh; Maria da Luz Lima Mendonca; Marietjie Venter; Marietou F Paye; Martin Faye; Martin M. Nyaga; Mathabo Mareka; Matoke-Muhia Damaris; Maureen W. Mburu; Maximillian Mpina; Claujens Chastel MFOUTOU MAPANGUY; Michael Owusu; Michael R. Wiley; Mirabeau Youtchou Tatfeng; Mitoha Ondo'o Ayekaba; Mohamed Abouelhoda; Mohamed Amine Beloufa; Mohamed G Seadawy; Mohamed K. Khalifa; Mohammed Koussai DELLAGI; Mooko Marethabile Matobo; Mouhamed Kane; Mouna Ouadghiri; Mounerou Salou; Mphaphi B. Mbulawa; Mudashiru Femi Saibu; Mulenga Mwenda; My V.T. Phan; Nabil Abid; Nadia Touil; Nadine Rujeni; Nalia Ismael; Ndeye Marieme Top; Ndongo Dia; Nedio Mabunda; Nei-yuan Hsiao; Nelson Borico Silochi; Ngonda Saasa; Nicholas Bbosa; Nickson Murunga; Nicksy Gumede; Nicole Wolter; Nikita Sitharam; Nnaemeka Ndodo; Nnennaya A. Ajayi; Noel Tordo; Nokuzola Mbhele; Norosoa H Razanajatovo; Nosamiefan Iguosadolo; Nwando Mba; Ojide C. Kingsley; Okogbenin Sylvanus; Okokhere Peter; Oladiji Femi; Olumade Testimony; Olusola Akinola Ogunsanya; Oluwatosin Fakayode; Onwe E. Ogah; Ousmane Faye; Pamela Smith-Lawrence; Pascale Ondoa; Patrice Combe; Patricia Nabisubi; Patrick Semanda; Paul E. Oluniyi; Paulo Arnaldo; Peter Kojo Quashie; Philip Bejon; Philippe Dussart; Phillip A. Bester; Placide K. Mbala; Pontiano Kaleebu; Priscilla Abechi; Rabeh El-Shesheny; Rageema Joseph; Ramy Karam Aziz; Rene Ghislain Essomba; Reuben Ayivor-Djanie; Richard Njouom; Richard O. Phillips; Richmond Gorman; Robert A. Kingsley; Rosemary Audu; Rosina A.A. Carr; Saad El Kabbaj; Saba Gargouri; Saber Masmoudi; Safietou Sankhe; Sahra Isse Mohamed; Salma MHALLA; Salome Hosch; Samar Kamal Kassim; Samar Metha; Sameh Trabelsi; Sanaa Lemriss; Sara Hassan Agwa; Sarah Wambui Mwangi; Seydou Doumbia; Sheila Makiala-Mandanda; Sherihane Aryeetey; Shymaa S. Ahmed; SIDI MOHAMED AHMED; Siham Elhamoumi; Sikhulile Moyo; Silvia Lutucuta; Simani Gaseitsiwe; Simbirie Jalloh; Soafy Andriamandimby; Sobajo Oguntope; Solene Grayo; Sonia Lekana-Douki; Sophie Prosolek; Soumeya Ouangraoua; Stephanie van Wyk; Stephen F. Schaffner; Stephen Kanyerezi; Steve AHUKA-MUNDEKE; Steven Rudder; Sureshnee Pillay; Susan Nabadda; Sylvie Behillil; Sylvie L. Budiaki; Sylvie van der Werf; Tapfumanei Mashe; Tarik Aanniz; Thabo Mohale; Thanh Le-Viet; Thirumalaisamy P. Velavan; Tobias Schindler; Tongai Maponga; Trevor Bedford; Ugochukwu J. Anyaneji; Ugwu Chinedu; Upasana Ramphal; Vincent Enouf; Vishvanath Nene; Vivianne Gorova; Wael H. Roshdy; Wasim Abdul Karim; William K. Ampofo; Wolfgang Preiser; Wonderful T. Choga; Yahaya ALI ALI AHMED; Yajna Ramphal; Yaw Bediako; Yeshnee Naidoo; Yvan Butera; Zaydah R. de Laurent; Ahmed E.O. Ouma; Anne von Gottberg; George Githinji; Matshidiso Moeti; Oyewale Tomori; Pardis C. Sabeti; Amadou A. Sall; Samuel O. Oyola; Yenew K. Tebeje; Sofonias K. Tessema; Tulio de Oliveira; Christian Happi; Richard Lessells; John Nkengasong; Eduan Wilkinson.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22273906

ABSTRACT

Investment in Africa over the past year with regards to SARS-CoV-2 genotyping has led to a massive increase in the number of sequences, exceeding 100,000 genomes generated to track the pandemic on the continent. Our results show an increase in the number of African countries able to sequence within their own borders, coupled with a decrease in sequencing turnaround time. Findings from this genomic surveillance underscores the heterogeneous nature of the pandemic but we observe repeated dissemination of SARS-CoV-2 variants within the continent. Sustained investment for genomic surveillance in Africa is needed as the virus continues to evolve, particularly in the low vaccination landscape. These investments are very crucial for preparedness and response for future pathogen outbreaks. One-Sentence SummaryExpanding Africa SARS-CoV-2 sequencing capacity in a fast evolving pandemic.

7.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22273322

ABSTRACT

BackgroundCOVID-19 impacts the cardiovascular system resulting in myocardial damage and also affects the kidneys leading to renal dysfunction. This effect is mostly through the binding with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and Neuropilin-1(NRP-l) receptors. Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) typically combine with microbial pathogens and provoke an inflammatory response. AimThis work aims to compare the changes in kidney and heart function bioindicators and expressions of TLRs (TLR2 and TLR2) as well as ACE2 and NRP-l receptors in moderate and severe COVID-19 patients. The correlations between kidney and heart function bioindicators and expressions of these receptors are also studied. Patients and MethodsIn this study, 50 healthy control and 100 COVID-19 patients (55 male and 45 female) were enrolled. According to WHO guidelines, these participants were divided into severe (50 cases) and moderate (50 cases). Serum creatinine, blood urea, CKMB, LDH, and Troponin I were estimated. We measured the gene expression for Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4), ACE2, and NRP-1 in the blood samples using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT -PCR). ResultsIn comparison with the healthy group, all patients exhibited a significant elevation in the serum creatinine, blood urea, cardiac enzymes, and CRP. As well, all studied patients revealed a significant elevation in the expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA. In all patients, CKMB, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA expression levels were positively correlated to both TLR2 and TLR4 expression levels. Moreover, serum creatinine and blood urea were positively correlated to both TLR2 and TLR 4 expression levels in the severe group only. ConclusionsOur study concluded that expression levels for TLR2, TLR4, ACE2, and NRP-1 mRNA in both severe and moderate patients were positively correlated with renal biomarkers and cardiac enzymes. Innate immune markers can be important because they correlate with the severity of illness in COVID-19.

8.
Health Psychol Behav Med ; 10(1): 357-378, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774269

ABSTRACT

Background: Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) are at far greater risk of experiencing poor mental health (MH) than wider society. This disparity was exacerbated by additional 'unique to sexual minority status' COVID-19 stressors. Objective: This sequential, mixed-methods study examined remote MH help-seeking among GBMSM in the U.K. and Ireland during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Methods and Results: Quantitative survey data (n = 1368), analysed with logistic regression, suggested GBMSM experiencing moderate-to-severe anxiety and those with a past MH diagnosis were most likely to seek MH support. Thematic analysis of qualitative interview (n = 18) data identified multiple barriers and enablers to GBMSM seeking remote MH help, with the help primarily sought from GBMSM-facing organisations and generic online resources. Finally, the behaviour change wheel was used to generate theoretically informed recommendations to promote MH help-seeking among GBMSM in Scotland. Implications: We discuss how applying these recommendations in the short, medium and long term will begin to address GBMSM's MH needs, post COVID-19.

9.
IJID Regions ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1773387

ABSTRACT

Objective The aim of this paper is to establish the predictive ability of demographic and clinical factors in diagnosing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Qatar's publicly funded primary care settings. Methods Reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) test and COVID-19 screening data (COVID-19 related factors) were extracted from electronic medical records for all individuals who visited a primary health care centre in Qatar between 15th March to 15th June 2020. Data analysis was undertaken to assess the validity of individual factors in predicting a positive rt-PCR test. Results Fever/history of fever [N= 1471 (54.7%);OR 4.6 (95% CI 4.16 - 5.08)], followed by cough [N=1020 (37.9%);OR 1.82 (95% CI 1.65 - 2)] and headache [N=1.45 (13.78%);OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.27 - 1.67)] were the most frequently reported clinical symptom amongst individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV2 infection by rt-PCR. Only five factors fever/history of fever, cough, working/living in an area reporting local transmission, gender and headache (rank according to predictive power) were found to be statistically significant. Fever/history of fever alone had a specificity of 79.2% and it gradually increased to 99.9% in combination with runny nose, cough, male gender and age ≥ 50. A tool was Conclusions The study identified predictive ability of factors in diagnosing COVID-19, individually and in combination. It proposes a scoring system for use in publicly funded primary care settings in Qatar without an rt-PCR test, thus enabling early isolation and treatment where necessary. Further similar studies are needed as newer variations of SARS-CoV2 are continuously emerging to ensure its accuracy.

10.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(7):4048, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762161

ABSTRACT

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common postoperative complications. Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) can prevent the occurrence of SSIs if administered appropriately. We carried out a retrospective cohort study to determine the incidence of SSIs and assess whether SAP were administered according to WHO guidelines for Caesarean section (CS) and herniorrhaphy patients in Bo regional government hospital from November 2019 to October 2020. The analysis included 681 patients (599 CSs and 82 herniorrhaphies). Overall, the SSI rate was 6.7% among all patients, and 7.5% and 1.2% among CS patients and herniorrhaphy patients, respectively. SAP was administered preoperatively in 85% of CS and 70% of herniorrhaphy patients. Postoperative antibiotics were prescribed to 85% of CS and 100% of herniorrhaphy patients. Ampicillin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin were the most commonly used antibiotics. The relatively low rate of SSIs observed in this study is probably due to improved infection prevention and control (IPC) measures following the Ebola outbreak and the current COVID-19 pandemic. A good compliance rate with WHO guidelines for preoperative SAP was observed. However, there was a high use of postoperative antibiotics, which is not in line with WHO guidelines. Recommendations were made to ensure the appropriate administration of SAP and reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics.

11.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) ; 79(9):896-896, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1751249
12.
J Infect ; 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751099
13.
Clin Case Rep ; 10(3): e05570, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750327

ABSTRACT

Acute pericarditis is an uncommon presentation of COVID-19. Here, we described a case of a 50-year-old male patient who presented with chest pain without fever or cough and diagnosed with acute pericarditis complicated by pericardial effusion due to COVID-19 after exclusion of other causes and received supportive treatment and improved over two weeks.

15.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(2): e523, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712083

ABSTRACT

Background: Since December 2019, (COVID-19) has had a significant impact on global health systems. Because little is known about the clinical characteristics and risk factors connected with COVID-19 severity in Sudanese patients, it is vital to summarize the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients and to investigate the risk factors linked to COVID-19 severity. Objectives: We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 patients and look into risk factors associated with COVID-19 severity. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study that took place in two Isolation Centers in Wad Medani, Gezira State, Sudan. Four hundred and eighteen patients were included between May 2020 and May 2021. All COVID-19 patients over the age of 18 who were proven COVID-19 positive by nucleic acid testing or had characteristics suggestive of COVID-19 on a chest CT scan and had a complete medical record in the study period were included. Results: The participants in this study were 418 confirmed COVID-19 cases with a median age of 66.313 years. There were 279 men (66.7%) among the patients. The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (n = 195; 46.7%) and diabetes (n = 187; 44.7%). Fever (n = 303; 72.5%), cough (n = 278; 66.5%), and dyspnea (n = 256; 61.2%) were the most prevalent symptoms at the onset of COVID-19. The overall mortality rate (n = 148) was 35.4%. Patients with severe illness had a mortality rate of 42.3% (n = 118). Older age, anemia, neutrophilia, and lymphocytopenia, as well as higher glucose, HbA1c, and creatinine levels, were all linked to severe COVID-19, according to the chi-square test and analysis of variance analysis. Conclusion: Sixteen variables were found to be associated with COVID-19 severity. These patients are more prone to go through a serious infection and as a result have a greater death rate than those who do not have these characteristics.

16.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(2): e525, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705401

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mortality rates and clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) vary significantly. Objectives: To describe the data of patients with pulmonary comorbidities who were admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 in Qatar in terms of demographic characteristics, coexisting conditions, imaging findings, and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of the outcomes with regard to mortality and requirement of invasive ventilation, demographic characteristics, coexisting conditions, secondary infections, and imaging findings for critical care patients with COVID-19 in Qatar who had pulmonary comorbidities between March and June 2020. Results: A total of 923 patients were included, 29 (3.14%) were found to have pulmonary disease. All these 29 patients' respiratory disease was noted to be asthma. Among these, three patients (10.3%) died in the ICU within 28 days of ICU admission. They were all above 50 years old. Nineteen (66%) patients required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Twenty-one (72.4%) patients were males. The most common comorbidities included diabetes mellitus (55.1%) and hypertension (62%). Eighteen (62%) patients developed secondary infections in the ICU. Five (17.24%) patients developed renal impairment. Twenty (69%) patients received tocilizumab as part of their COVID-19 management, and out of these 16 (80%) patients developed a coinfection. Conclusion: Patients with pulmonary disorders had higher mortality rates than other patients admitted to ICU during the same time frame with similar comorbidities; these patients require extra consideration and care to avoid disease progression and death.

17.
Brain Behav ; 12(3): e2538, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with dementia are more prone to acquire COVID-19 infection. Patients with COVID-19 showed a tendency to develop cognitive impairment. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to study the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 infection among adult Sudanese demented patients and the prevalence of cognitive impairment among adult Sudanese nondemented patients. METHODOLOGY: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study that took place in Sudan, Khartoum state in the period (September to December 2021) in a private neurology/psychiatry clinic. A total of 135 adult Sudanese patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups. The first group consists of 100 patients with a known history of dementia that got infected recently with COVID-19, while the second group consists of 35 patients who developed some sort of cognitive impairment after recovering from COVID-19 infection. Regarding the second group, cognitive functions were assessed by senior consultant neurologist and senior consultant psychiatrist using a well validated neuropsychological measure. RESULTS: Out of 100 patients in the first group, females were 60 and males were 40. Age distribution is between 63 and 98. The common presenting symptoms of COVID-19 among this group were cough and fever (90 patients), diarrhea and vomiting (5 patients), breathlessness (4 patients), coughing of blood (5 patients), convulsions (1 patient), paraplegia (1 patient), and hemiplegia (1 patient). Regarding the second group, age distribution varied from 30 to 80 years. Cognitive functions impairment was noticed as follows: memory recall (22%), memory recognition (23%), memory encoding (24%), processing speed (16%), executive functioning (19%), phonemic fluency (17%), and category fluency (17%). CONCLUSION: Patients with dementia are more susceptible to develop COVID-19 infection. Patients with COVID-19 Infection are at risk of developing some sort of cognitive impairment after recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognition Disorders , Cognitive Dysfunction , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Cognition Disorders/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Executive Function , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuropsychological Tests
19.
Sci Total Environ ; 825: 153988, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692891

ABSTRACT

The identification of SARS-CoV-2 particles in wastewater and freshwater ecosystems has raised concerns about its possible impacts on non-target aquatic organisms. In this particular, our knowledge of such impacts is still limited, and little attention has been given to this issue. Hence, in our study, we aimed to evaluate the possible induction of mutagenic (via micronucleus test) and genotoxic (via single cell gel electrophoresis assay, comet assay) effects in Poecilia reticulata adults exposed to fragments of the Spike protein of the new coronavirus at the level of 40 µg/L, denominated PSPD-2002. As a result, after 10 days of exposure, we have found that animals exposed to the peptides demonstrated an increase in the frequency of erythrocytic nuclear alteration (ENA) and all parameters assessed in the comet assay (length tail, %DNA in tail and Olive tail moment), suggesting that PSPD-2002 peptides were able to cause genomic instability and erythrocyte DNA damage. Besides, these effects were significantly correlated with the increase in lipid peroxidation processes [inferred by the high levels of malondialdehyde (MDA)] reported in the brain and liver of P. reticulata and with the reduction of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. Thus, our study constitutes a new insight and promising investigation into the toxicity associated with the dispersal of SARS-CoV-2 peptide fragments in freshwater environments.

20.
Aquat Toxicol ; 245: 106104, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693934

ABSTRACT

There have been significant impacts of the current COVID-19 pandemic on society including high health and economic costs. However, little is known about the potential ecological risks of this virus despite its presence in freshwater systems. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the exposure of Poecilia reticulata juveniles to two peptides derived from Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, which was synthesized in the laboratory (named PSPD-2002 and PSPD-2003). For this, the animals were exposed for 35 days to the peptides at a concentration of 40 µg/L and different toxicity biomarkers were assessed. Our data indicated that the peptides were able to induce anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The biometric evaluation also revealed that the animals exposed to the peptides displayed alterations in the pattern of growth/development. Furthermore, the increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymes were accompanied by increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which suggests a redox imbalance induced by SARS-CoV-2 spike protein peptides. Moreover, molecular docking analysis suggested a strong interaction of the peptides with the enzymes AChE, SOD and CAT, allowing us to infer that the observed effects are related to the direct action of the peptides on the functionality of these enzymes. Consequently, our study provided evidence that the presence of SARS-CoV-2 viral particles in the freshwater ecosystems offer a health risk to fish and other aquatic organisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Poecilia , Water Pollutants, Chemical , Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism , Animals , Catalase/metabolism , Ecosystem , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Poecilia/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Water Pollutants, Chemical/toxicity
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