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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-337884

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background: COVID-19 outbreak resulted in negative mental health consequences such as depression, anxiety, and stress, particularly among healthcare workers. Objective: To evaluate health care workers' mental well-being and explore the reasons standing beyond their concerns and fears. Methods: : From January to June 2021, we recruited 107 health care workers from psychiatric hospitals. The translated Arabic version COVID stress scale was used to assess their level of stress. The WHO Quality of Life - BREF score was used to assess their level of affection for their quality of life. Results: : The majority of our sample (45.8%) was between the ages of 20 and 30. Females made up 37.8% of the group. The majority of them were infected during the first wave. The COVID Stress Scale (CSS) revealed that 21.5% of participants had no signs or symptoms of depression, while 55.1% had mild symptoms. Only 23.4% of our sample had moderate to severe symptoms. When categorized by domains, the mean CSS score was 12.21 ± 5.62 for the danger subscale, 6.18 ± 4.07 for the socioeconomic subscale, 8.44 ± 4.58 for the xenophobia subscale, 7.99 ± 4.18 for the contamination subscale, 5.87 ± 4.32 for traumatic subscale, and 11.13 ± 6.15 for compulsive subscale. The mean scores for the WHO QOL-brief score for the physical aspect were 91.51 ± 21.5, 75.25 ± 12.84 for the psychological aspect, 40.42 ± 8.52 for the social aspect, and 96.26 ± 17.76 for the environmental aspect. Conclusion: we discovered that healthcare workers experienced high levels of stress, particularly during and after COVID -19 pandemic waves.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332996

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 outbreak resulted in negative mental health consequences such as depression, anxiety, and stress, particularly among health-care workers. Objective: To evaluate health care worker mental well-being and explore the reasons standing beyond their concerns and fears. Methods: From January to June 2021, we recruited 107 health care workers from psychiatric hospitals. The translated Arabic version COVID stress scale was used to assess their level of stress. The WHO Quality of Life - BREF score was used to assess their level of affection for their quality of life. Results: The majority of our sample (45.8%) was between the ages of 20 and 30. Females made up 37.8% of the group. The majority of them were infected during the first wave. The COVID Stress Scale (CSS) revealed that 21.5% of participants had no signs or symptoms of depression, while 55.1% had mild symptoms. Only 23.4% of our sample had moderate to severe symptoms. When categorised by domains, the mean CSS score was 12.21 ± 5.62 for danger subscale, 6.18 ± 4.07 for socioeconomic subscale, 8.44 ± 4.58 for xenophobia subscale, 7.99 ± 4.18 for contamination subscale, 5.87 ± 4.32 for traumatic subscale, and 11.13 ± 6.15 for compulsive subscale. The mean scores for the WHO QOL-brief score for physical aspect were 91.51 ± 21.5, 75.25 ± 12.84 for psychological aspect, 40.42 ± 8.52 for social aspect, and 96.26 ± 17.76 for environmental aspect. Conclusion: we discovered that health-care workers experienced high levels of stress, particularly during and after COVID -19 pandemic waves.

3.
Research Square ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1786475

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 outbreak resulted in negative mental health consequences such as depression, anxiety, and stress, particularly among health-care workers. Objective: To evaluate health care worker mental well-being and explore the reasons standing beyond their concerns and fears. Methods: From January to June 2021, we recruited 107 health care workers from psychiatric hospitals. The translated Arabic version COVID stress scale was used to assess their level of stress. The WHO Quality of Life - BREF score was used to assess their level of affection for their quality of life. Results: The majority of our sample (45.8%) was between the ages of 20 and 30. Females made up 37.8% of the group. The majority of them were infected during the first wave. The COVID Stress Scale (CSS) revealed that 21.5% of participants had no signs or symptoms of depression, while 55.1% had mild symptoms. Only 23.4% of our sample had moderate to severe symptoms. When categorised by domains, the mean CSS score was 12.21 ± 5.62 for danger subscale, 6.18 ± 4.07 for socioeconomic subscale, 8.44 ± 4.58 for xenophobia subscale, 7.99 ± 4.18 for contamination subscale, 5.87 ± 4.32 for traumatic subscale, and 11.13 ± 6.15 for compulsive subscale. The mean scores for the WHO QOL-brief score for physical aspect were 91.51 ± 21.5, 75.25 ± 12.84 for psychological aspect, 40.42 ± 8.52 for social aspect, and 96.26 ± 17.76 for environmental aspect. Conclusion: we discovered that health-care workers experienced high levels of stress, particularly during and after COVID -19 pandemic waves.

4.
Case Reports in Oncology ; 13(3):1430-1440, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1396171

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been a serious threat and has been reported with different presentations and complications. Older age, along with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, or cardiac disease, increases the risk factors for COVID-19 severity and death [N Engl J Med. 2020;382(18):1708–20 and Lancet Respir Med. 2020 05;8(5):475–81]. It is proposed that cancer patients have a significantly higher incidence of severe incidents including admission to the intensive care unit, the necessity for assisted ventilation, and even death after catching the virus compared with non-cancer patients [Lancet Oncol. 2020;21(3):335–7]. It is also described that cancer patients appear to be twice as likely to contract infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) [JAMA Oncol. 2020;6(7):1108–10]. Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, with patients typically presenting with cytopenias, marked splenomegaly in 80–90% of patients, circulating leukemia cells, bone marrow infiltration and the presence of BRAF V600E somatic mutation [Indian J Hematol Blood Transfus. 2014;30(Suppl 1):413–7]. Leukemic cells classically have central nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with hairy-like projections and express CD11c, CD25, CD103, and CD123 [Indian J Hematol Blood Transfus. 2014;30(Suppl 1):413–7]. Loss of CD123 in HCL has been rarely reported in the literature [Am J Hematol. 2019;94(12):1413–22]. We describe a unique case of a COVID-19-positive male who presented with severe respiratory symptoms, deteriorated quickly, and was intubated. Workup of severe progressive pancytopenia and bone marrow examination revealed HCL without splenomegaly and with atypical unusual loss of CD123. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CD123-negative HCL without splenomegaly associated with COVID-19 infection as the initial presentation.

5.
Front Robot AI ; 8: 652685, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266693

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic has brought the world to a standstill. Healthcare systems are critical to maintain during pandemics, however, providing service to sick patients has posed a hazard to frontline healthcare workers (HCW) and particularly those caring for elderly patients. Various approaches are investigated to improve safety for HCW and patients. One promising avenue is the use of robots. Here, we model infectious spread based on real spatio-temporal precise personal interactions from a geriatric unit and test different scenarios of robotic integration. We find a significant mitigation of contamination rates when robots specifically replace a moderate fraction of high-risk healthcare workers, who have a high number of contacts with patients and other HCW. While the impact of robotic integration is significant across a range of reproductive number R0, the largest effect is seen when R0 is slightly above its critical value. Our analysis suggests that a moderate-sized robotic integration can represent an effective measure to significantly reduce the spread of pathogens with Covid-19 transmission characteristics in a small hospital unit.

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