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1.
Cureus ; 14(3): e22770, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776622

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected millions worldwide with a high mortality rate due to a lack of definitive treatment. Despite having a wide range of clinical features, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as the primary cause of mortality in these patients. Risk factors and comorbidities like advanced age with limited lung function, pre-existing diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity have increased the risk for severe COVID-19 infection. Rise in inflammatory markers like transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 7 (MMP-1, MMP-7), along with collagen deposition at the site of lung injury, results in extensive lung scarring and fibrosis. Anti-fibrotic drugs, such as Pirfenidone and Nintedanib, have emerged as potential treatment options for post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis. A lung transplant might be the only life-saving treatment. Despite the current advances in the management of COVID-19, there is still a considerable knowledge gap in the management of long-term sequelae in such patients, especially concerning pulmonary fibrosis. Follow up on the current clinical trials and research to test the efficacy of various anti-inflammatory drugs is needed to prevent long-term sequelae early mortality in these patients.

2.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211059348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571725

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating worldwide effect on mental health. Recent studies correlate the spreading of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with symptoms of depression, most prominent in postpartum women. Our systematic literature review scope is to identify the risk factors and predictors for postpartum depression (PPD) and describe the steps that should be taken to help postpartum women. This study will help clinicians, researchers, and policymakers to elucidate the predictors of PPD during this pandemic and prevent these adverse outcomes in future crises. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search by employing databases PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Embase to identify articles published before March 2021. About 463 publications were generated during our search process and from those, 36 were reviewed, summarized, and synthesized. Studies qualified the criteria if they (1) utilized qualitative or quantitative design, (2) explored the risk factors for PPD, and (3) were written in English. Quality evaluation of each study was achieved by using criteria set by Lincoln and Guba. RESULTS: Prevalence of depression symptoms ranged from 7% to 80.8% in postpartum women during the SARS-COV 2 pandemic. The risk factors for PPD were classified into 6 major categories: socio-demographic, psychological, pre-existing pathology, metabolic factors, previous events of miscarriage, and media misinformation. CONCLUSION: It is extremely vital to care for women's mental health during pregnancy and after childbirth during these unprecedented times. This review urges the need to design adequate interventions for this vulnerable population to prevent negative consequences of PPD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression, Postpartum , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Acta Medica Iranica ; 59(11):657-661, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1529424

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 that causes Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first known in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of common hepatic, renal, and cardiac diagnostic markers in hospitals in patients with severe COVID 19. In this study, 259 patients with symptoms of severe COVID-19 and a positive RT-PCR assay of nasopharyngeal samples were enrolled. Inclusion criteria are positive for COVID-19 patients at the diagnosis of an infectious disease physician. Diagnostic markers of liver, kidney, and heart were evaluated by age and gender. In this study, 48.3% of patients severe with COVID-19 were male, and 51.7% were female. The mean of markers such as LDH, Direct Bilirubin, SGOT, SGPT, D-dimer was higher than normal, which was observed in men more than women. The mean of CK-MB also was higher than normal, which was observed in women more than men. The highest mean of markers was seen in the older ages. The mean of BUN was observed in the age range of 55-64 years and above 65 years above normal. But the mean of CPK, creatinine, potassium and alkaline phosphatase were normal. The results of the present study showed an increase in the level of some of the most important diagnostic markers of hepatic, renal, and cardiac in patients with COVID 19. This increase was greater in some markers, including SGOT, SGPT, Direct bilirubin, LDH, D-dimer, in men than in women, and more in older patients. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Acta Medica Iranica is the property of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(6): 102319, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474482

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The current study was done to examine the efficacy of naproxen in the management of patients with COVID-19 infection. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was done on hospitalized adult patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either naproxen (two capsules per day each containing 500 mg naproxen sodium) or placebo (containing starch) for five days along with the routine treatment that was nationally recommended for COVID-19 infection. Clinical symptoms of COVID-19 infection, the time to clinical improvement, blood pressure, laboratory parameters, and death due to COVID-19 infection were considered as the outcome variables in the present study. RESULTS: Treatment with naproxen improved cough and shortness of breath in COVID-19 patients; such that, compared with placebo, naproxen intake was associated with 2.90 (95% CI: 1.10-7.66) and 2.82 (95% CI: 1.05-7.55) times more improvement in cough and shortness of breath, respectively. In addition, naproxen administration resulted in a significant increase in mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and had a preventive effect on the reduction of systolic blood pressure in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: Treatment with naproxen can improve cough and shortness of breath in COVID-19-infected patients. Further studies are required to confirm our findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Naproxen/therapeutic use , Adult , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged
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