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2.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 57(5): 742-752, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702554

ABSTRACT

In 2020, 45,364 HCT in 41,016 patients, 18,796 (41%) allogeneic and 26,568 (59%) autologous in 690 centers were reported. Changes observed were as follows: total number of HCT -6.5%, allogeneic HCT -5.1%, autologous HCT -7.5%, and were more pronounced in non-malignant disorders for allogeneic HCT and in autoimmune disease for autologous HCT. Main indications were myeloid malignancies 10,441 (25%), lymphoid malignancies 26,120 (64%) and non-malignant disorders 2532 (6%). A continued growth in CAR-T cellular therapies to 1874 (+65%) patients in 2020 was observed. In allogeneic HCT, the use of haploidentical donors increased while use of unrelated and sibling donors decreased. Cord blood HCT increased by 11.7% for the first time since 2012. There was a significant increase in the use of non-myeloablative but a drop in myeloablative conditioning and in use of marrow as stem cell source. We interpreted these changes as being due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic starting early in 2020 in Europe and provided additional data reflecting the varying impact of the pandemic across selected countries and larger cities. The transplant community confronted with the pandemic challenge, continued in providing patients access to treatment. This annual report of the EBMT reflects current activities useful for health care planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Neoplasms , Europe/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Neoplasms/etiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplantation, Homologous
5.
Lancet Haematol ; 8(12): e934-e946, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486371

ABSTRACT

Patients with multiple myeloma frequently present with substantial immune impairment and an increased risk for infections and infection-related mortality. The risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2 virus and resulting mortality is also increased, emphasising the importance of protecting patients by vaccination. Available data in patients with multiple myeloma suggest a suboptimal anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response, meaning a proportion of patients are unprotected. Factors associated with poor response are uncontrolled disease, immunosuppression, concomitant therapy, more lines of therapy, and CD38 antibody-directed and B-cell maturation antigen-directed therapy. These facts suggest that monitoring the immune response to vaccination in patients with multiple myeloma might provide guidance for clinical management, such as administration of additional doses of the same or another vaccine, or even temporary treatment discontinuation, if possible. In those who do not exhibit a good response, prophylactic treatment with neutralising monoclonal antibody cocktails might be considered. In patients deficient of a SARS-CoV-2 immune response, adherence to measures for infection risk reduction is particularly recommended. This consensus was generated by members of the European Multiple Myeloma Network and some external experts. The panel members convened in virtual meetings and conducted an extensive literature research and evaluated recently published data and work presented at meetings, as well as findings from their own studies. The outcome of the discussions on establishing consensus recommendations for COVID-19 vaccination in patients with multiple myeloma was condensed into this Review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Multiple Myeloma/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Consensus , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
6.
Clin Hematol Int ; 3(1): 1-2, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448687
7.
Clin Hematol Int ; 2(2): 41-42, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448684
9.
Blood Cancer J ; 11(8): 142, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351934

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of BNT162b2 vaccine in patients with hematological malignancies. Antibodies blocking spike binding to immobilized ACE-2 (NAb) correlated with anti-Spike (S) IgG d42 titers (Spearman r = 0.865, p < 0.0001), and an anti-S IgG d42 level ≥3100 UA/mL was predictive of NAb ≥ 30%, the positivity cutoff for NAb (p < 0.0001). Only 47% of the patients achieved an anti-S IgG d42 level ≥3100 UA/mL after the two BNT162b2 inocula, compared to 87% of healthy controls. In multivariable analysis, male patients, use of B-cell targeting treatment within the last 12 months prior to vaccination, and CD19+ B-cell level <120/uL, were associated with a significantly decreased probability of achieving a protective anti-S IgG level after the second BNT162b2 inoculum. Finally, using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, we found a significant increase in T-cell response against the S protein, with 53% of patients having an anti-S IgG-positive ELISPOT after the second BNT162b2 inoculum. There was a correlation between the anti-S ELISPOT response and IgG d42 level (Spearman r = 0.3026, p = 0.012). These findings suggest that vaccination with two BNT162b2 inocula translates into a significant increase in humoral and cellular response in patients with hematological malignancies, but only around half of the patients can likely achieve effective immune protection against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Comorbidity , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Young Adult
10.
Acta Haematol ; 144(5): 500-507, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125393

ABSTRACT

Patients receiving a hematopoietic cell transplant are thought to be at increased risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and coronavirus infectious disease 2019. Transplant activities at our center continue, and notably, no patient has been infected with SARS-CoV-2. Indeed, social distancing, masking, and education for patients and donors are major pillars of prevention. We recommend potential transplant recipients and donors to be tested for SARS-CoV-2 with qRT-PCR, serum antibody detection, and a lung CT scan pretransplant. If possible, stem cells from HLA-matched unrelated donors by local processing laboratories should be cryopreserved and shipped before initiating pretransplant conditioning. An alternative HLA-haplotype-matched related donor should be identified and evaluated as a backup. The interval immediately after discharge is the time of greatest risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection because of travel and exposure to infected persons. We recommend self-isolation and minimal contact with family members. Nonessential clinic visits should be deferred or substituted with telemedicine consultations if possible. These recommendations are based on our experience at a major transplant center in China. Although some recommendations are evidence based, other recommendations are not and warrant validation in controlled trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Hematologic Diseases/diagnosis , Hematologic Diseases/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/psychology , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tissue Donors/psychology
12.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(12): 2181-2189, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722012

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has impacted many facets of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in both developed and developing countries. Realizing the challenges as a result of this pandemic affecting the daily practice of the HCT centers and the recognition of the variability in practice worldwide, the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT) and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research's (CIBMTR) Health Services and International Studies Committee have jointly produced an expert opinion statement as a general guide to deal with certain aspects of HCT, including diagnostics for SARS-CoV-2 in HCT recipient, pre- and post-HCT management, donor issues, medical tourism, and facilities management. During these crucial times, which may last for months or years, the HCT community must reorganize to proceed with transplantation activity in those patients who urgently require it, albeit with extreme caution. This shared knowledge may be of value to the HCT community in the absence of high-quality evidence-based medicine. © 2020 American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
13.
Curr Res Transl Med ; 68(3): 111-118, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-622221

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is spreading rapidly across the world. Currently, the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the continuity of essential routine healthcare services and procedures, including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy, a life-saving option for patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) hematologic malignancies. Due to the rapid disease progression of hematological malignancies, there is an urgent need to manufacture and utilize CAR T-cells. However, CAR-T treatment has become extraordinarily challenging during this COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, many medical and technical factors must now be taken into consideration before, during, and after CAR-T therapy. The purpose of this review is to provide brief suggestions for rational decision-making strategies in evaluating and selecting CAR T-cell treatment and appropriate CAR T-cell products, and protective strategies for medical staff and patients to prevent infection in the midst of the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/trends , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/trends , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 55(11): 2071-2076, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260560

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread over the world causing the disease by WHO called COVID-19. This pandemic poses unprecedented stress on the health care system including programs performing allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and cellular therapy such as with CAR T cells. Risk factors for severe disease include age and predisposing conditions such as cancer. The true impact on stem cell transplant and CAR T-cell recipients in unknown. The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) has therefore developed recommendations for transplant programs and physicians caring for these patients. These guidelines were developed by experts from the Infectious Diseases Working Party and have been endorsed by EBMT's scientific council and board. This work intends to provide guidelines for transplant centers, management of transplant candidates and recipients, and donor issues until the COVID-19 pandemic has passed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Accreditation/organization & administration , Allografts , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Europe , Health Personnel , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Office Visits , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Tissue Donors , Transplant Recipients , Transplantation, Autologous , Visitors to Patients
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