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2.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 214: 105965, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454329

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D deficiency is a negative endocrine renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulator and PCOS women are often vitamin D deficient, leading to RAS overactivation in PCOS. A cross-sectional study was performed in 99 PCOS and 68 control women who presented sequentially. Circulating plasma levels of RAS proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), renin and angiotensinogen) were measured by Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured by tandem mass spectroscopy. The RAS system was found to be overactivated in the PCOS women compared to non-PCOS control women with increased renin and decreased angiotensinogen (p < 0.05); 25-hydroxyvitamin D was also significantly lower in the PCOS group (p < 0.0001). In PCOS women, plasma renin was increased in vitamin D deficient and insufficient groups compared with the vitamin D sufficient group (p < 0.005), but did not differ across non-PCOS control subgroups. In non-PCOS controls, plasma ACE2 decreased from vitamin D insufficiency to deficiency (p < 0.05). Angiotensinogen was not different across the vitamin D sufficiency, insufficiency and deficiency strata for either PCOS or non-PCOS controls. These data show that RAS activation through increased plasma renin levels was seen in vitamin D insufficient and deficient PCOS subjects compared to non-PCOS control women. In addition, decreased plasma ACE2 levels were seen in vitamin D deficiency in non-PCOS controls, which may predispose these vitamin D deficient subjects to increased cardiovascular risk and susceptibility to infectious agents such as COVID-19 where this is a risk factor.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , Angiotensinogen/blood , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/blood , Renin/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Adult , Blood Pressure , Female , Humans , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology , Vitamins/blood , Young Adult
3.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 665134, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305637

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Neuropilin-1(NRP1) is a cofactor that enhances SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus cell infectivity when co-expressed with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2(ACE2). The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is activated in type 2 diabetes (T2D); therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if hypoglycaemia-induced stress in T2D would potentiate serum NRP1(sNRP1) levels, reflecting an increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: A case-control study of aged-matched T2D (n = 23) and control (n = 23) subjects who underwent a hyperinsulinemic clamp over 1-hour to hypoglycemia(<40mg/dl) with subsequent timecourse of 4-hours and 24-hours. Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement determined RAS-related proteins: renin (REN), angiotensinogen (AGT), ACE2, soluble NRP1(sNRP1), NRP1 ligands (Vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF and Class 3 Semaphorins, SEM3A) and NRP1 proteolytic enzyme (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 9, ADAM9). Results: Baseline RAS overactivity was present with REN elevated and AGT decreased in T2D (p<0.05); ACE2 was unchanged. Baseline sNRP1, VEGF and ADAM9 did not differ between T2D and controls and remained unchanged in response to hypoglycaemia. However, 4-hours post-hypoglycemia, sNRP1, VEGF and ADAM9 were elevated in T2D(p<0.05). SEMA3A was not different at baseline; at hypoglycemia, SEMA3A decreased in controls only. Post-hypoglycemia, SEMA3A levels were higher in T2D versus controls. sNRP1 did not correlate with ACE2, REN or AGT. T2D subjects stratified according to ACE inhibitor (ACEi) therapies showed no difference in sNRP1 levels at either glucose normalization or hypoglycaemia. Conclusion: Hypoglycemia potentiated both plasma sNRP1 level elevation and its ligands VEGF and SEMA3A, likely through an ADAM9-mediated mechanism that was not associated with RAS overactivity or ACEi therapy; however, whether this is protective or promotes increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection in T2D is unclear. Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT03102801.


Subject(s)
ADAM Proteins/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Hypoglycemia/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Semaphorin-3A/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Aged , Angiotensins/metabolism , COVID-19 , Female , Glucose Clamp Technique , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Renin/metabolism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 658304, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305636

ABSTRACT

Objective: Detailed proteomic analysis in a cohort of patients with differing severity of COVID-19 disease identified biomarkers within the complement and coagulation cascades as biomarkers for disease severity has been reported; however, it is unclear if these proteins differ sufficiently from other conditions to be considered as biomarkers. Methods: A prospective, parallel study in T2D (n = 23) and controls (n = 23). A hyperinsulinemic clamp was performed and normoglycemia induced in T2D [4.5 ± 0.07 mmol/L (81 ± 1.2 mg/dl)] for 1-h, following which blood glucose was decreased to ≤2.0 mmol/L (36 mg/dl). Proteomic analysis for the complement and coagulation cascades were measured using Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan. Results: Thirty-four proteins were measured. At baseline, 4 of 18 were found to differ in T2D versus controls for platelet degranulation [Neutrophil-activating peptide-2 (p = 0.014), Thrombospondin-1 (p = 0.012), Platelet factor-4 (p = 0.007), and Kininogen-1 (p = 0.05)], whilst 3 of 16 proteins differed for complement and coagulation cascades [Coagulation factor IX (p < 0.05), Kininogen-1 (p = 0.05), and Heparin cofactor-2 (p = 0.007)]; STRING analysis demonstrated the close relationship of these proteins to one another. Induced euglycemia in T2D showed no protein changes versus baseline. At hypoglycemia, however, four proteins changed in controls from baseline [Thrombospondin-1 (p < 0.014), platelet factor-4 (p < 0.01), Platelet basic protein (p < 0.008), and Vitamin K-dependent protein-C (p < 0.00003)], and one protein changed in T2D [Vitamin K-dependent protein-C, (p < 0.0002)]. Conclusion: Seven of 34 proteins suggested to be biomarkers of COVID-19 severity within the platelet degranulation and complement and coagulation cascades differed in T2D versus controls, with further changes occurring at hypoglycemia, suggesting that validation of these biomarkers is critical. It is unclear if these protein changes in T2D may predict worse COVID-19 disease for these patients. Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/, identifier NCT03102801.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Hypoglycemia/metabolism , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , Blood Coagulation , Case-Control Studies , Complement Activation , Factor IX/metabolism , Female , Glucose Clamp Technique , Heparin Cofactor II/metabolism , Humans , Kininogens/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Peptides/metabolism , Platelet Activation , Platelet Factor 4/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Protein C/metabolism , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombospondin 1/metabolism , beta-Thromboglobulin/metabolism
5.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 651009, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190304

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with severe COVID-19 infections have coagulation abnormalities indicative of a hypercoagulable state, with thromboembolic complications and increased mortality. Platelets are recognized as mediators of inflammation, releasing proinflammatory and prothrombotic factors, and are hyperactivated in COVID-19 infected patients. Activated platelets have also been reported in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, putting these patients at higher risk for thromboembolic complications of COVID-19 infection. Methods: A case-control study of T2D (n=33) and control subjects (n=30) who underwent a hyperinsulinemic clamp to induce normoglycemia in T2D subjects: T2D: baseline glucose 7.5 ± 0.3mmol/l (135.1 ± 5.4mg/dl), reduced to 4.5 ± 0.07mmol/l (81 ± 1.2mg/dl) with 1-hour clamp; Controls: maintained at 5.1 ± 0.1mmol/l (91.9 ± 1.8mg/dl). Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement was used to determine a panel of platelet proteins. Results: Prothrombotic platelet proteins were elevated in T2D versus controls: platelet factor 4 (PF4, p<0.05); platelet glycoprotein VI (PGVI p<0.05); P-selectin (p<0.01) and plasminogen activator inhibitor I (PAI-1, p<0.01). In addition, the antithrombotic platelet-related proteins, plasmin (p<0.05) and heparin cofactor II (HCFII, p<0.05), were increased in T2D. Normalization of glucose in the T2D cohort had no effect on platelet protein levels. Conclusion: T2D patients have platelet hyperactivation, placing them at higher risk for thromboembolic events. When infected with COVID-19, this risk may be compounded, and their propensity for a more severe COVID-19 disease course increased. Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03102801, identifier NCT03102801.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelet Disorders/blood , Blood Platelet Disorders/etiology , Blood Platelets/chemistry , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Hypoglycemia/blood , Hypoglycemia/complications , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Female , Glucose Clamp Technique , Humans , Lipids/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Activation , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/etiology
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6428, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142462

ABSTRACT

Hyperactivation of the immune system through obesity and diabetes may enhance infection severity complicated by Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The objective was to determine the circulatory biomarkers for macrophage activation at baseline and after serum glucose normalization in obese type 2 diabetes (OT2D) subjects. A case-controlled interventional pilot study in OT2D (n = 23) and control subjects (n = 23). OT2D subjects underwent hyperinsulinemic clamp to normalize serum glucose. Plasma macrophage-related proteins were determined using Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer-scan plasma protein measurement at baseline (control and OT2D subjects) and after 1-h of insulin clamp (OT2D subjects only). Basal M1 macrophage activation was characterized by elevated levels of M1 macrophage-specific surface proteins, CD80 and CD38, and cytokines or chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, RANTES) released by activated M1 macrophages. Two potent M1 macrophage activation markers, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were decreased in OT2D. Activated M2 macrophages were characterized by elevated levels of plasma CD163, TFGß-1, MMP7 and MMP9 in OT2D. Conventional mediators of both M1 and M2 macrophage activation markers (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-13) were not altered. No changes were observed in plasma levels of M1/M2 macrophage activation markers in OT2D in response to acute normalization of glycemia. In the basal state, macrophage activation markers are elevated, and these reflect the expression of circulatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, that were not changed by glucose normalisation. These differences could potentially predispose diabetic individuals to increased infection severity complicated by ARDS. Clinical trial reg. no: NCT03102801; registration date April 6, 2017.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Macrophage Activation , Obesity/complications , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/blood , Obesity/immunology , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
9.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 638621, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133905

ABSTRACT

Background: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often have vitamin D deficiency, a known risk factor for severe COVID-19 disease. Alveolar macrophage-derived cytokines contribute to the inflammation underlying pulmonary disease in COVID-19. We sought to determine if basal macrophage activation, as a risk factor for COVID-19 infection, was present in PCOS and, if so, was further enhanced by vitamin D deficiency. Methods: A cross-sectional study in 99 PCOS and 68 control women who presented sequentially. Plasma levels of a macrophage-derived cytokine panel were determined by Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement. Vitamin D was measured by tandem mass spectroscopy. Results: Vitamin D was lower in PCOS women (p<0.0001) and correlated negatively with body mass index (BMI) in PCOS (r=0.28, p=0.0046). Basal macrophage activation markers CXCL5, CD163 and MMP9 were elevated, whilst protective CD200 was decreased (p<0.05); changes in these variables were related to, and fully accounted for, by BMI. PCOS and control women were then stratified according to vitamin D concentration. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with decreased CD80 and IFN-γ in PCOS and IL-12 in both groups (p<0.05). These factors, important in initiating and maintaining the immune response, were again accounted for by BMI. Conclusion: Basal macrophage activation was higher in PCOS with macrophage changes related with increased infection risk associating with vitamin D; all changes were BMI dependent, suggesting that obese PCOS with vitamin D deficiency may be at greater risk of more severe COVID-19 infection, but that it is obesity-related rather than an independent PCOS factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Adult , Biomarkers/analysis , Blood Proteins/analysis , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Macrophage Activation , Macrophages/chemistry , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/complications , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/immunology , Risk Assessment , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
12.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 490, 2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992500
15.
Metabol Open ; 7: 100052, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-718931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus gains entry to target cells via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor present on cells in blood vessels, lungs, heart, intestines, and kidneys. Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) overactivity has also been described in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity, conditions shared by women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) We hypothesized that RAS overactivity may be present in PCOS. METHODS: We determined plasma levels of RAS-related proteins in a cohort of age matched control women (n = 97) and women with PCOS (n = 146). Plasma levels of RAS-related proteins (ACE2, Renin and Angiotensinogen (AGT)) were determined by Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement. RESULTS: PCOS women had a higher BMI (p < 0.001), systolic (p < 0.0001) and diastolic (p < 0.05) blood pressure, waist circumference (p < 0.0001), testosterone (p < 0.0001), free androgen index (p < 0.0001) and CRP (p < 0.0001). Renin was elevated in PCOS (p < 0.05) and angiotensinogen was lower in PCOS (p < 0.05), indicating overactivity of the RAS system in PCOS. ACE2 levels were lower in PCOS (p < 0.05), suggesting that PCOS women are at risk for development of hypertension. CONCLUSION: RAS proteins levels differed between PCOS and control women, suggesting that the insulin resistance inherent in PCOS may predispose these women to more severe COVID-19 infection.

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