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1.
Viruses ; 14(7)2022 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911652

ABSTRACT

Antigenic imprinting, which describes the bias of the antibody response due to previous immune history, can influence vaccine effectiveness. While this phenomenon has been reported for viruses such as influenza, there is little understanding of how prior immune history affects the antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. This study provides evidence for antigenic imprinting through immunization with two Sarbecoviruses, the subgenus that includes SARS-CoV-2. Mice were immunized subsequently with two antigenically distinct Sarbecovirus strains, namely SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2. We found that sequential heterologous immunization induced cross-reactive binding antibodies for both viruses and delayed the emergence of neutralizing antibody responses against the booster strain. Our results provide fundamental knowledge about the immune response to Sarbecovirus and important insights into the development of pan-sarbecovirus vaccines and guiding therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
2.
Nat Med ; 2022 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900516

ABSTRACT

Timely evaluation of the protective effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern is urgently needed to inform pandemic control planning. Based on 78 vaccine efficacy or effectiveness (VE) data from 49 studies and 1,984,241 SARS-CoV-2 sequences collected from 31 regions, we analyzed the relationship between genetic distance (GD) of circulating viruses against the vaccine strain and VE against symptomatic infection. We found that the GD of the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is highly predictive of vaccine protection and accounted for 86.3% (P = 0.038) of the VE change in a vaccine platform-based mixed-effects model and 87.9% (P = 0.006) in a manufacturer-based model. We applied the VE-GD model to predict protection mediated by existing vaccines against new genetic variants and validated the results by published real-world and clinical trial data, finding high concordance of predicted VE with observed VE. We estimated the VE against the Delta variant to be 82.8% (95% prediction interval: 68.7-96.0) using the mRNA vaccine platform, closely matching the reported VE of 83.0% from an observational study. Among the four sublineages of Omicron, the predicted VE varied between 11.9% and 33.3%, with the highest VE predicted against BA.1 and the lowest against BA.2, using the mRNA vaccine platform. The VE-GD framework enables predictions of vaccine protection in real time and offers a rapid evaluation method against novel variants that may inform vaccine deployment and public health responses.

4.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 206(3): 361-362, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846618
5.
Euro Surveill ; 27(18)2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834266

ABSTRACT

BackgroundOmicron subvariant BA.2 circulation is rapidly increasing globally.AimWe evaluated the neutralising antibody response from vaccination or prior SARS-CoV-2 infection against symptomatic infection by BA.2 or other variants.MethodsUsing 50% plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNT50), we assessed neutralising antibody titres to BA.2, wild type (WT) SARS-CoV-2 and other variants in Comirnaty or CoronaVac vaccinees, with or without prior WT-SARS-CoV-2 infection. Titres were also measured for non-vaccinees convalescing from a WT-SARS-CoV-2 infection. Neutralising antibodies in BA.2 and BA.1 breakthrough infections and in BA.2 infections affecting non-vaccinees were additionally studied.ResultsIn vaccinees or prior WT-SARS-CoV-2-infected people, BA.2 and BA.1 PRNT50 titres were comparable but significantly (p < 10 - 5) lower than WT. In each group of 20 vaccinees with (i) three-doses of Comirnaty, (ii) two CoronaVac followed by one Comirnaty dose, or (iii) one dose of either vaccine after a WT-SARS-CoV-2 infection, ≥ 19 individuals developed detectable (PRNT50 titre ≥ 10) antibodies to BA.2, while only 15 of 20 vaccinated with three doses of CoronaVac did. Comirnaty vaccination elicited higher titres to BA.2 than CoronaVac. In people convalescing from a WT-SARS-CoV-2 infection, a single vaccine dose induced higher BA.2 titres than three Comirnaty (p = 0.02) or CoronaVac (p = 0.00001) doses in infection-naïve individuals. BA.2 infections in previously uninfected and unvaccinated individuals elicited low (PRNT50 titre ≤ 80) responses with little cross-neutralisation of other variants. However, vaccinees with BA.1 or BA.2 breakthrough infections had broad cross-neutralising antibodies to WT viruses, and BA.1, BA.2, Beta and Delta variants.ConclusionsExisting vaccines can be of help against the BA.2 subvariant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Vaccination
6.
J Travel Med ; 2022 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795212

ABSTRACT

Using two early transmission chains in Hong Kong, the estimated R and k were 1.34 (95%CrI: 0.94-2.19) and 0.33 (95%CrI: 0.17-0.62) respectively, inferring 20.3% (95%CrI: 12.7%-29.6%) cases were responsible for 80% of the transmissions of the Omicron epidemic. Compared with Omicron BA.1, Omicron BA.2 had a greater superspreading potential.

8.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328832

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 Omicron subvariant BA.2 is increasing in some areas of the world and it is important to assess how well current vaccines may protect against this infection. BioNTech Pfizer (BNT162b2) and CoronaVac are widely used COVID-19 vaccines globally. We determined the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) and PRNT90 antibody titres to BA.2 virus in sera (twenty each collected 3-5 weeks after third dose) from cohorts vaccinated with three doses of BNT162b2, three doses of CoronaVac, two doses of CoronaVac followed by a third dose of BNT162b2 and those convalescent from SARS-CoV-2 (ancestral virus) (143-196 days after infection). We compared the PRNT titres to BA.2 with titres to BA.1 and ancestral virus. We demonstrate that PRNT50 and PRNT90 antibody titres to BA.2 are markedly reduced compared with those to ancestral virus and reduced as much as was observed for BA.1 virus. Those vaccinated with three doses of BNT162b2 or vaccinated with two doses of CoronaVac and a third dose of BNT162b2 develop PRNT antibody titres above the protective threshold from symptomatic infection. Those vaccinated with three doses of CoronaVac fail to achieve protective levels of PRNT50 antibody to BA.2 subvariant of Omicron 3-5 weeks after vaccination.

9.
Nat Med ; 28(3): 486-489, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631094

ABSTRACT

The Omicron variant is rapidly becoming the dominant SARS-CoV-2 virus circulating globally. It is important to define reductions in virus neutralizing activity in the serum of convalescent or vaccinated individuals to understand potential loss of protection against infection by Omicron. We previously established that a 50% plaque reduction neutralization antibody titer (PRNT50) ≥25.6 in our live virus assay corresponded to the threshold for 50% protection from infection against wild-type (WT) SARS-CoV-2. Here we show markedly reduced serum antibody titers against the Omicron variant (geometric mean titer (GMT) < 10) compared to WT virus 3-5 weeks after two doses of BNT162b2 (GMT = 218.8) or CoronaVac vaccine (GMT = 32.5). A BNT162b2 booster dose elicited Omicron PRNT50 titers ≥25.6 in 88% of individuals (22 of 25) who previously received 2 doses of BNT162b2 and 80% of individuals (24 of 30) who previously received CoronaVac. However, few (3%) previously infected individuals (1 of 30) or those vaccinated with three doses of CoronaVac (1 of 30) met this threshold. Our findings suggest that countries primarily using CoronaVac vaccines should consider messenger RNA vaccine boosters in response to the spread of Omicron. Studies evaluating the effectiveness of different vaccines against the Omicron variant are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 761250, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556220

ABSTRACT

Amino acid substitutions and deletions in the Spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants can reduce the effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In contrast, heterologous polyclonal antibodies raised against S protein, through the recognition of multiple target epitopes, have the potential to maintain neutralization capacities. XAV-19 is a swine glyco-humanized polyclonal neutralizing antibody raised against the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the Wuhan-Hu-1 Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. XAV-19 target epitopes were found distributed all over the RBD and particularly cover the receptor binding motives (RBMs), in direct contact sites with the angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2). Therefore, in Spike/ACE-2 interaction assays, XAV-19 showed potent neutralization capacities of the original Wuhan Spike and of the United Kingdom (Alpha/B.1.1.7) and South African (Beta/B.1.351) variants. These results were confirmed by cytopathogenic assays using Vero E6 and live virus variants including the Brazil (Gamma/P.1) and the Indian (Delta/B.1.617.2) variants. In a selective pressure study on Vero E6 cells conducted over 1 month, no mutation was associated with the addition of increasing doses of XAV-19. The potential to reduce viral load in lungs was confirmed in a human ACE-2 transduced mouse model. XAV-19 is currently evaluated in patients hospitalized for COVID-19-induced moderate pneumonia in phase 2a-2b (NCT04453384) where safety was already demonstrated and in an ongoing 2/3 trial (NCT04928430) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of XAV-19 in patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19. Owing to its polyclonal nature and its glyco-humanization, XAV-19 may provide a novel safe and effective therapeutic tool to mitigate the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) including the different variants of concern identified so far.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Heterophile/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Heterophile/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antigenic Variation , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Mice , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Swine , Viral Load/drug effects
11.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294372

ABSTRACT

Timely evaluation of the protective effects of COVID-19 vaccines is challenging but urgently needed to inform the pandemic control planning. Based on vaccine efficacy/effectiveness (VE) data of 11 vaccine products and 297,055 SARS-CoV-2 sequences collected in 20 regions, we analyzed the relationship between genetic mismatch of circulating viruses against the vaccine strain and VE. Variations from technology platforms are controlled by a mixed-effects model. We found that the genetic mismatch measured on the RBD is highly predictive for vaccine protection and accounted for 72.0% ( p -value < 0.01) of the VE change. The NTD and S protein also demonstrate significant but weaker per amino acid substitution association with VE ( p -values < 0.01). The model is applied to predict vaccine protection of existing vaccines against new genetic variants and is validated by independent cohort studies. The estimated VE against the delta variant is 79.3% (95% prediction interval: 67.0 – 92.1) using the mRNA platform, and an independent survey reported a close match of 83.0%;against the beta variant (B.1.351) the predicted VE is 53.8% (95% prediction interval: 39.9 – 67.4) using the viral-vector vaccines, and an observational study reported a close match of 48.0%. Genetic mismatch provides an accurate prediction for vaccine protection and offers a rapid evaluation method against novel variants to facilitate vaccine deployment and public health responses.

12.
Respirology ; 27(4): 301-310, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Few head-to-head evaluations of immune responses to different vaccines have been reported. METHODS: Surrogate virus neutralization test (sVNT) antibody levels of adults receiving either two doses of BNT162b2 (n = 366) or CoronaVac (n = 360) vaccines in Hong Kong were determined. An age-matched subgroup (BNT162b2 [n = 49] vs. CoronaVac [n = 49]) was tested for plaque reduction neutralization (PRNT) and spike-binding antibody and T-cell reactivity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. RESULTS: One month after the second dose of vaccine, BNT162b2 elicited significantly higher PRNT50 , PRNT90 , sVNT, spike receptor binding, spike N-terminal domain binding, spike S2 domain binding, spike FcR binding and antibody avidity levels than CoronaVac. The geometric mean PRNT50 titres in those vaccinated with BNT162b2 and CoronaVac vaccines were 251.6 and 69.45, while PRNT90 titres were 98.91 and 16.57, respectively. All of those vaccinated with BNT162b2 and 45 (91.8%) of 49 vaccinated with CoronaVac achieved the 50% protection threshold for PRNT90. Allowing for an expected seven-fold waning of antibody titres over 6 months for those receiving CoronaVac, only 16.3% would meet the 50% protection threshold versus 79.6% of BNT162b2 vaccinees. Age was negatively correlated with PRNT90 antibody titres. Both vaccines induced SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses at 1 month post-vaccination but CoronaVac elicited significantly higher structural protein-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. CONCLUSION: Vaccination with BNT162b2 induces stronger humoral responses than CoronaVac. CoronaVac induces higher CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to the structural protein than BNT162b2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hong Kong , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Nat Immunol ; 22(11): 1416-1427, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475314

ABSTRACT

Ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene 15) (ISG15) is a ubiquitin-like modifier induced during infections and involved in host defense mechanisms. Not surprisingly, many viruses encode deISGylating activities to antagonize its effect. Here we show that infection by Zika, SARS-CoV-2 and influenza viruses induce ISG15-modifying enzymes. While influenza and Zika viruses induce ISGylation, SARS-CoV-2 triggers deISGylation instead to generate free ISG15. The ratio of free versus conjugated ISG15 driven by the papain-like protease (PLpro) enzyme of SARS-CoV-2 correlates with macrophage polarization toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype and attenuated antigen presentation. In vitro characterization of purified wild-type and mutant PLpro revealed its strong deISGylating over deubiquitylating activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of PLpro substrates and secretome from SARS-CoV-2-infected macrophages revealed several glycolytic enzymes previously implicated in the expression of inflammatory genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that altered free versus conjugated ISG15 dysregulates macrophage responses and probably contributes to the cytokine storms triggered by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Ubiquitins/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Cytokines/genetics , Gene Knockdown Techniques , HeLa Cells , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Ubiquitination , Ubiquitins/genetics , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/immunology
14.
Pathogens ; 10(10)2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444291

ABSTRACT

Viral transcription is an essential step of SARS-CoV-2 infection after invasion into the target cells. Antiviral drugs such as remdesivir, which is used to treat COVID-19 patients, targets the viral RNA synthesis. Understanding the mechanism of viral transcription may help to develop new therapeutic treatment by perturbing virus replication. In this study, we established 28 ddPCR assays and designed specific primers/probe sets to detect the RNA levels of 15 NSP, 9 ORF, and 4 structural genes of SARS-CoV-2. The transcriptional kinetics of these viral genes were determined longitudinally from the beginning of infection to 12 h postinfection in Caco-2 cells. We found that SARS-CoV-2 takes around 6 h to hijack the cells before the initiation of viral transcription process in human cells. Our results may contribute to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

15.
Cell Rep ; 35(8): 109173, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227991

ABSTRACT

Individuals with the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) show varying severity of the disease, ranging from asymptomatic to requiring intensive care. Although monoclonal antibodies specific to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been identified, we still lack an understanding of the overall landscape of B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires in individuals with COVID-19. We use high-throughput sequencing of bulk and plasma B cells collected at multiple time points during infection to characterize signatures of the B cell response to SARS-CoV-2 in 19 individuals. Using principled statistical approaches, we associate differential features of BCRs with different disease severity. We identify 38 significantly expanded clonal lineages shared among individuals as candidates for responses specific to SARS-CoV-2. Using single-cell sequencing, we verify the reactivity of BCRs shared among individuals to SARS-CoV-2 epitopes. Moreover, we identify the natural emergence of a BCR with cross-reactivity to SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 in some individuals. Our results provide insights important for development of rational therapies and vaccines against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cross Reactions , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Epitopes , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Severity of Illness Index , Sf9 Cells , Single-Cell Analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
ACS Cent Sci ; 7(5): 792-802, 2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225483

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a global threat to human health. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we identified and validated the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor simeprevir as an especially promising repurposable drug for treating COVID-19. Simeprevir potently reduces SARS-CoV-2 viral load by multiple orders of magnitude and synergizes with remdesivir in vitro. Mechanistically, we showed that simeprevir not only inhibits the main protease (Mpro) and unexpectedly the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) but also modulates host immune responses. Our results thus reveal the possible anti-SARS-CoV-2 mechanism of simeprevir and highlight the translational potential of optimizing simeprevir as a therapeutic agent for managing COVID-19 and future outbreaks of CoV.

17.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(3): 385-395, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1162009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) remains of global public health concern. Dromedary camels are the source of zoonotic infection. Over 70% of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-infected dromedaries are found in Africa but no zoonotic disease has been reported in Africa. We aimed to understand whether individuals with exposure to dromedaries in Africa had been infected by MERS-CoV. METHODS: Workers slaughtering dromedaries in an abattoir in Kano, Nigeria, were compared with abattoir workers without direct dromedary contact, non-abattoir workers from Kano, and controls from Guangzhou, China. Exposure to dromedaries was ascertained using a questionnaire. Serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were tested for MERS-CoV specific neutralising antibody and T-cell responses. FINDINGS: None of the participants from Nigeria or Guangdong were MERS-CoV seropositive. 18 (30%) of 61 abattoir workers with exposure to dromedaries, but none of 20 abattoir workers without exposure (p=0·0042), ten non-abattoir workers or 24 controls from Guangzhou (p=0·0002) had evidence of MERS-CoV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in PBMC. T-cell responses to other endemic human coronaviruses (229E, OC43, HKU-1, and NL-63) were observed in all groups with no association with dromedary exposure. Drinking both unpasteurised camel milk and camel urine was significantly and negatively associated with T-cell positivity (odds ratio 0·07, 95% CI 0·01-0·54). INTERPRETATION: Zoonotic infection of dromedary-exposed individuals is taking place in Nigeria and suggests that the extent of MERS-CoV infections in Africa is underestimated. MERS-CoV could therefore adapt to human transmission in Africa rather than the Arabian Peninsula, where attention is currently focused. FUNDING: The National Science and Technology Major Project, National Institutes of Health.


Subject(s)
Camelus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Camelus/virology , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Young Adult , Zoonoses/transmission , Zoonoses/virology
18.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 30, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097198

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since early February 2021, the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, has infected over 104 million people with more than 2 million deaths according to official reports. The key to understanding the biology and virus-host interactions of SARS-CoV-2 requires the knowledge of mutation and evolution of this virus at both inter- and intra-host levels. However, despite quite a few polymorphic sites identified among SARS-CoV-2 populations, intra-host variant spectra and their evolutionary dynamics remain mostly unknown. METHODS: Using high-throughput sequencing of metatranscriptomic and hybrid captured libraries, we characterized consensus genomes and intra-host single nucleotide variations (iSNVs) of serial samples collected from eight patients with COVID-19. The distribution of iSNVs along the SARS-CoV-2 genome was analyzed and co-occurring iSNVs among COVID-19 patients were identified. We also compared the evolutionary dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 population in the respiratory tract (RT) and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). RESULTS: The 32 consensus genomes revealed the co-existence of different genotypes within the same patient. We further identified 40 intra-host single nucleotide variants (iSNVs). Most (30/40) iSNVs presented in a single patient, while ten iSNVs were found in at least two patients or identical to consensus variants. Comparing allele frequencies of the iSNVs revealed a clear genetic differentiation between intra-host populations from the respiratory tract (RT) and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), mostly driven by bottleneck events during intra-host migrations. Compared to RT populations, the GIT populations showed a better maintenance and rapid development of viral genetic diversity following the suspected intra-host bottlenecks. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings here illustrate the intra-host bottlenecks and evolutionary dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 in different anatomic sites and may provide new insights to understand the virus-host interactions of coronaviruses and other RNA viruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Genome, Viral/genetics , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Haplotypes , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
19.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(6): 1412-1422, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084381

ABSTRACT

Heterologous polyclonal antibodies might represent an alternative to the use of convalescent plasma or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) by targeting multiple antigen epitopes. However, heterologous antibodies trigger human natural xenogeneic antibody responses particularly directed against animal-type carbohydrates, mainly the N-glycolyl form of the neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and the α1,3-galactose, potentially leading to serum sickness or allergy. Here, we immunized cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase and α1,3-galactosyl-transferase (GGTA1) double KO pigs with the Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike receptor binding domain to produce glyco-humanized polyclonal neutralizing antibodies lacking Neu5Gc and α1,3-galactose epitopes. Animals rapidly developed a hyperimmune response with anti-SARS-CoV-2 end-titers binding dilutions over one to a million and end-titers neutralizing dilutions of 1:10 000. The IgG fraction purified and formulated following clinical Good Manufacturing Practices, named XAV-19, neutralized spike/angiotensin converting enzyme-2 interaction at a concentration <1 µg/mL, and inhibited infection of human cells by SARS-CoV-2 in cytopathic assays. We also found that pig GH-pAb Fc domains fail to interact with human Fc receptors, thereby avoiding macrophage-dependent exacerbated inflammatory responses and a possible antibody-dependent enhancement. These data and the accumulating safety advantages of using GH-pAbs in humans warrant clinical assessment of XAV-19 against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Animals, Genetically Modified/genetics , Animals, Genetically Modified/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , Galactosyltransferases/deficiency , Galactosyltransferases/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sialic Acids/genetics , Sialic Acids/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Swine
20.
J Clin Invest ; 130(10): 5235-5244, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969923

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent for coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. Little is known about the kinetics, tissue distribution, cross-reactivity, and neutralization antibody response in patients with COVID-19. Two groups of patients with RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in this study: 12 severely ill patients in intensive care units who needed mechanical ventilation and 11 mildly ill patients in isolation wards. Serial clinical samples were collected for laboratory detection. Results showed that most of the severely ill patients had viral shedding in a variety of tissues for 20-40 days after onset of disease (8/12, 66.7%), while the majority of mildly ill patients had viral shedding restricted to the respiratory tract and had no detectable virus RNA 10 days after onset (9/11, 81.8%). Mildly ill patients showed significantly lower IgM response compared with that of the severe group. IgG responses were detected in most patients in both the severe and mild groups at 9 days after onset, and remained at a high level throughout the study. Antibodies cross-reactive to SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 were detected in patients with COVID-19 but not in patients with MERS. High levels of neutralizing antibodies were induced after about 10 days after onset in both severely and mildly ill patients which were higher in the severe group. SARS-CoV-2 pseudotype neutralization test and focus reduction neutralization test with authentic virus showed consistent results. Sera from patients with COVID-19 inhibited SARS-CoV-2 entry. Sera from convalescent patients with SARS or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) did not. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S and N IgG levels exhibited a moderate correlation with neutralization titers in patients' plasma. This study improves our understanding of immune response in humans after SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Viral Load , Virus Shedding , Adult , Aged , Antibody Specificity , COVID-19 , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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