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Butler-Laporte, Guillaume, Povysil, Gundula, Kosmicki, Jack, Cirulli, Elizabeth, Drivas, Theodore, Furini, Simone, Saad, Chadi, Schmidt, Axel, Olszewski, Pawel, Korotko, Urszula, Quinodoz, Mathieu, Çelik, Elifnaz, Kundu, Kousik, Walter, Klaudia, Jung, Junghyung, Stockwell, Amy, Sloofman, Laura, Charney, Alexander, Jordan, Daniel, Beckmann, Noam, Przychodzen, Bartlomiej, Chang, Timothy, Pottinger, Tess, Shang, Ning, Brand, Fabian, Fava, Francesca, Mari, Francesca, Chwialkowska, Karolina, Niemira, Magdalena, Pula, Szymon, Baillie, Kenneth, Stuckey, Alex, Ganna, Andrea, Karczewski, Konrad, Veerapen, Kumar, Bourgey, Mathieu, Bourque, Guillaume, Eveleigh, Robert J. M.; Forgetta, Vincenzo, Morrison, David, Langlais, David, Lathrop, Mark, Mooser, Vincent, Nakanishi, Tomoko, Frithiof, Robert, Hultström, Michael, Lipcsey, Miklos, Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara, Nordlund, Jessica, Schiabor Barrett, Kelly, Lee, William, Bolze, Alexandre, White, Simon, Riffle, Stephen, Tanudjaja, Francisco, Sandoval, Efren, Neveux, Iva, Dabe, Shaun, Casadei, Nicolas, Motameny, Susanne, Alaamery, Manal, Massadeh, Salam, Aljawini, Nora, Almutairi, Mansour, Arabi, Yaseen, Alqahtan, Saleh, Al Harthi, Fawz, Almutairi, Amal, Alqubaishi, Fatima, Alotaibi, Sarah, Binowayn, Albandari, Alsolm, Ebtehal, Bardisy, Hadeel El, Fawzy, Mohammad, Geschwind, Daniel, Arteaga, Stephanie, Stephens, Alexis, Butte, Manish, Boutros, Paul, Yamaguchi, Takafumi, Tao, Shu, Eng, Stefan, Sanders, Timothy, Tung, Paul, Broudy, Michael, Pan, Yu, Gonzalez, Alfredo, Chavan, Nikhil, Johnson, Ruth, Pasaniuc, Bogdan, Yaspan, Brian, Smieszek, Sandra, Rivolta, Carlo, Bibert, Stephanie, Bochud, Pierre-Yves, Dabrowski, Maciej, Zawadzki, Pawel, Sypniewski, Mateusz, Kaja, Elżbieta, Chariyavilaskul, Pajaree, Nilaratanakul, Voraphoj, Hirankarn, Nattiya, Shotelersuk, Vorasuk, Pongpanich, Monnat, Phokaew, Chureerat, Chetruengchai, Wanna, Kawai, Yosuke, Hasegawa, Takanori, Naito, Tatsuhiko, Namkoong, Ho, Edahiro, Ryuya, Kimura, Akinori, Ogawa, Seishi, Kanai, Takanori, Fukunaga, Koichi, Okada, Yukinori, Imoto, Seiya, Miyano, Satoru, Mangul, Serghei, Abedalthagafi, Malak, Zeberg, Hugo, Grzymski, Joseph, Washington, Nicole, Ossowski, Stephan, Ludwig, Kerstin, Schulte, Eva, Riess, Olaf, Moniuszko, Marcin, Kwasniewski, Miroslaw, Mbarek, Hamdi, Ismail, Said, Verma, Anurag, Goldstein, David, Kiryluk, Krzysztof, Renieri, Alessandra, Ferreira, Manuel, Richards, Brent, Initiative, Covid- Host Genetics, De, C. O. I. Host Genetics Group, Study, Gen-Covid Multicenter, Gen, Omicc Consortium, Japan, Covid-Task Force, Regeneron Genetics, Center.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332108

ABSTRACT

Host genetics is a key determinant of COVID-19 outcomes. Previously, the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative genome-wide association study used common variants to identify multiple loci associated with COVID-19 outcomes. However, variants with the largest impact on COVID-19 outcomes are expected to be rare in the population. Hence, studying rare variants may provide additional insights into disease susceptibility and pathogenesis, thereby informing therapeutics development. Here, we combined whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing from 21 cohorts across 12 countries and performed rare variant exome-wide burden analyses for COVID-19 outcomes. In an analysis of 5,048 severe disease cases and 571,009 controls, we observed that carrying a rare deleterious variant in the SARS-CoV-2 sensor toll-like receptor TLR7 (on chromosome X) was associated with a 5.3-fold increase in severe disease (95% CI: 2.75-10.05, p=5.41×10 -7 ). These results further support TLR7 as a genetic determinant of severe disease and suggest that larger studies on rare variants influencing COVID-19 outcomes could provide additional insights.

2.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365266

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0245031, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314324

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for more than 2.8 million deaths and nearly 125 million infections worldwide as of March 2021. In March 2020, the World Health Organization determined that the COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic. The urgency and magnitude of this pandemic demanded immediate action and coordination between local, regional, national, and international actors. In that mission, researchers require access to high-quality biological materials and data from SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients, covering the spectrum of disease manifestations. The "Biobanque québécoise de la COVID-19" (BQC19) is a pan-provincial initiative undertaken in Québec, Canada to enable the collection, storage and sharing of samples and data related to the COVID-19 crisis. As a disease-oriented biobank based on high-quality biosamples and clinical data of hospitalized and non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive and negative individuals. The BQC19 follows a legal and ethical management framework approved by local health authorities. The biosamples include plasma, serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and DNA and RNA isolated from whole blood. In addition to the clinical variables, BQC19 will provide in-depth analytical data derived from the biosamples including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, proteome and metabolome analyses, multiplex measurements of key circulating markers as well as anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses. BQC19 will provide the scientific and medical communities access to data and samples to better understand, manage and ultimately limit, the impact of COVID-19. In this paper we present BQC19, describe the process according to which it is governed and organized, and address opportunities for future research collaborations. BQC19 aims to be a part of a global communal effort addressing the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
PLoS Med ; 18(6): e1003605, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased vitamin D levels, as reflected by 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) measurements, have been proposed to protect against COVID-19 based on in vitro, observational, and ecological studies. However, vitamin D levels are associated with many confounding variables, and thus associations described to date may not be causal. Vitamin D Mendelian randomization (MR) studies have provided results that are concordant with large-scale vitamin D randomized trials. Here, we used 2-sample MR to assess evidence supporting a causal effect of circulating 25OHD levels on COVID-19 susceptibility and severity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genetic variants strongly associated with 25OHD levels in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 443,734 participants of European ancestry (including 401,460 from the UK Biobank) were used as instrumental variables. GWASs of COVID-19 susceptibility, hospitalization, and severe disease from the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative were used as outcome GWASs. These included up to 14,134 individuals with COVID-19, and up to 1,284,876 without COVID-19, from up to 11 countries. SARS-CoV-2 positivity was determined by laboratory testing or medical chart review. Population controls without COVID-19 were also included in the control groups for all outcomes, including hospitalization and severe disease. Analyses were restricted to individuals of European descent when possible. Using inverse-weighted MR, genetically increased 25OHD levels by 1 standard deviation on the logarithmic scale had no significant association with COVID-19 susceptibility (odds ratio [OR] = 0.95; 95% CI 0.84, 1.08; p = 0.44), hospitalization (OR = 1.09; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.33; p = 0.41), and severe disease (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.22; p = 0.77). We used an additional 6 meta-analytic methods, as well as conducting sensitivity analyses after removal of variants at risk of horizontal pleiotropy, and obtained similar results. These results may be limited by weak instrument bias in some analyses. Further, our results do not apply to individuals with vitamin D deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: In this 2-sample MR study, we did not observe evidence to support an association between 25OHD levels and COVID-19 susceptibility, severity, or hospitalization. Hence, vitamin D supplementation as a means of protecting against worsened COVID-19 outcomes is not supported by genetic evidence. Other therapeutic or preventative avenues should be given higher priority for COVID-19 randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/etiology , Case-Control Studies , Causality , Dietary Supplements , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/genetics , /genetics
5.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247462

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0245031, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234580

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for more than 2.8 million deaths and nearly 125 million infections worldwide as of March 2021. In March 2020, the World Health Organization determined that the COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic. The urgency and magnitude of this pandemic demanded immediate action and coordination between local, regional, national, and international actors. In that mission, researchers require access to high-quality biological materials and data from SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients, covering the spectrum of disease manifestations. The "Biobanque québécoise de la COVID-19" (BQC19) is a pan-provincial initiative undertaken in Québec, Canada to enable the collection, storage and sharing of samples and data related to the COVID-19 crisis. As a disease-oriented biobank based on high-quality biosamples and clinical data of hospitalized and non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive and negative individuals. The BQC19 follows a legal and ethical management framework approved by local health authorities. The biosamples include plasma, serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and DNA and RNA isolated from whole blood. In addition to the clinical variables, BQC19 will provide in-depth analytical data derived from the biosamples including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, proteome and metabolome analyses, multiplex measurements of key circulating markers as well as anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses. BQC19 will provide the scientific and medical communities access to data and samples to better understand, manage and ultimately limit, the impact of COVID-19. In this paper we present BQC19, describe the process according to which it is governed and organized, and address opportunities for future research collaborations. BQC19 aims to be a part of a global communal effort addressing the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
7.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 659-667, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104522

ABSTRACT

To identify circulating proteins influencing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) susceptibility and severity, we undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, rapidly scanning hundreds of circulating proteins while reducing bias due to reverse causation and confounding. In up to 14,134 cases and 1.2 million controls, we found that an s.d. increase in OAS1 levels was associated with reduced COVID-19 death or ventilation (odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, P = 7 × 10-8), hospitalization (OR = 0.61, P = 8 × 10-8) and susceptibility (OR = 0.78, P = 8 × 10-6). Measuring OAS1 levels in 504 individuals, we found that higher plasma OAS1 levels in a non-infectious state were associated with reduced COVID-19 susceptibility and severity. Further analyses suggested that a Neanderthal isoform of OAS1 in individuals of European ancestry affords this protection. Thus, evidence from MR and a case-control study support a protective role for OAS1 in COVID-19 adverse outcomes. Available pharmacological agents that increase OAS1 levels could be prioritized for drug development.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , SARS-CoV-2 , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/genetics , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Middle Aged , Neanderthals , Protein Isoforms/physiology , Quantitative Trait Loci , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Int J Epidemiol ; 50(1): 75-86, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been uncertainty about the safety or benefit of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors during the COVID-19 pandemic. We used Mendelian randomization using genetic determinants of serum-ACE levels to test whether decreased ACE levels increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19 severity, while reducing potential bias from confounding and reverse causation in observational studies. METHODS: Genetic variants strongly associated with ACE levels, which were nearby the ACE gene, were identified from the ORIGIN trial and a separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACE levels from the AGES cohort. The ORIGIN trial included 4147 individuals of European and Latino ancestries. Sensitivity analyses were performed using a study of 3200 Icelanders. Cohorts from the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative GWAS of up to 960 186 individuals of European ancestry were used for COVID-19 susceptibility, hospitalization and severe-disease outcome. RESULTS: Genetic variants were identified that explain between 18% and 37% of variance in ACE levels. Using genetic variants from the ORIGIN trial, a standard-deviation decrease in ACE levels was not associated with an increase in COVID-19 susceptibility [odds ratio (OR): 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90, 1.15], hospitalization (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68, 1.08) or severe disease (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.51, 1.06). Using genetic variants from the AGES cohort, the result was similar for susceptibility (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.09), hospitalization (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.11) and severity (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.50, 1.14). Multiple-sensitivity analyses led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Genetically decreased serum ACE levels were not associated with susceptibility to, or severity of, COVID-19 disease. These data suggest that individuals taking ACE inhibitors should not discontinue therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , COVID-19/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
9.
J Law Biosci ; 7(1): lsaa020, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690685

ABSTRACT

Effective responses to the COVID-19 pandemic require novel solutions for research and responsible data sharing. Biobanking presents itself as a key priority in furthering our understanding of COVID-19. In this article, we propose a tripartite approach to consent to create resources for research relating to COVID-19. The approach aims to link three levels of participation: COVID-19 patients, respiratory/infectious disease patients, and longitudinal study participants. We explore the potential approaches that can be taken to consent processes with these three participant groups. We furthermore describe an access model for both single-site and multi-site data and sample storage. Through dealing with these topics at a high level, the model may be adapted to local legal and ethical requirements while still pursuing its ultimate goal: the creation of a research infrastructure that supports transparent, strong, and open science.

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