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2.
Eur J Clin Nutr ; 76(9): 1297-1302, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This study aimed to evaluate serum 25-hydroxyvitmain D and zinc levels in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients in comparison to healthy subjects. METHODS: This was a single-center case-control study performed from March 20, 2020, to January 20, 2021, in Tehran, Iran. All patients diagnosed with COVID-19 based on a positive nasopharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test were included in the case group. Controls were selected from patients referred for routine checkups who had a negative COVID-19 PCR test. Age, sex, marital and educational status, comorbidities, and serum 25-hydroxyvitmain D and zinc levels of patients were recorded. RESULTS: Ninety patients in the case group and 95 subjects in the control group who were sex and age-matched were studied. 25-hydroxyvitmain D levels higher than 20 ng/ml were observed in 58 (64%) cases and 72 (76%) controls (P = 0.09). The median 25-hydroxyvitmain D level in the case group was significantly lower than controls (26 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24) ng/ml vs. 38 (IQR = 22) ng/ml, respectively, P < 0.01). The median zinc level in the case group was 56 (IQR = 23) mcg/dL, while it was 110 (IQR = 27) mcg/dL among the controls (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the level of 25-hydroxyvitmain D and zinc between cases with and without comorbidities (P > 0.05). Susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection could be predicted by serum 25-hydroxyvitmain D levels below 25.2 ng/ml (81% sensitivity; 48% specificity) or zinc levels below 86.3 mcg/dL (93% sensitivity; 92% specificity). CONCLUSIONS: Low serum zinc and 25-hydroxyvitmain D levels appear to be risk factors for COVID-19 affliction; thus, the treatment of individuals with such deficiencies is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Zinc
3.
Skin appendage disorders ; : 1-5, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1668463

ABSTRACT

Introduction The pandemic of COVID-19 has several implications for patients with chronic stress-sensitive diseases such as alopecia areata (AA). On the other hand, the vulnerability of AA patients using immunosuppressives to a more severe infection is in the shadow of ambiguity. This teledermatology study aimed to evaluate the course and outcome of AA in patients during this challenging period. Methods Patients with AA who had previously received systemic therapy included in this study. Information about demographic data, AA history, characteristics, and treatments, hair loss progression, Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS), adherence to protective measures against the COVID-19, possible infection, and its features obtained via a telephone call. Results A total of 57 patients participated. The majority (84.2%) of the participants had mild anxiety assessed by CDAS. Two patients (3.5%) had got infected with COVID-19. Twenty-one (36.8%) participants experienced hair loss progression. Hair loss progression correlated with drug dose reduction (OR: 46.09, 95% CI 5.48–387.14, p < 0.001) although it did not influence by the level of anxiety evaluated by the CDAS (p > 0.05). Conclusion The anxiety perceived by severe AA patients about COVID-19 is mild;however, many experience hair loss progressions owing to their drug dose reduction.

4.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(3): e15283, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583585

ABSTRACT

We report two cases of lichen planus following COVID-19 vaccination in two middle-aged women, where the first patient presented with lichenplanopilaris (LPP) relapse and development of lichen planus 14 days after the second dose of AstraZeneca vaccine, and the other patient who had a previous scattered lesion of LP which extended and increased in severity after the first and second dose of Sinopharm. The suggested cause could be due to immune dysregulation and up regulation of T cell lymphocytes which was triggered after COVID-19 vaccination. What supports our hypothesis that LP had occurred due to COVID-19 vaccination, is that one of the patients responded successfully to Metronidazole. This means that the infection process after vaccination could be the cause in aggravating LP. To add, one of the suggested mechanisms for the appearance of LP or reactivation of a dormant LPP can be cytotoxic CD8 T-lymphocytes which increase the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-5 cytokines and may also result in basal keratinocytes' apoptosis leading to cutaneous manifestations. This was supported by the efficacy of Tofacitinib that was used in the other patient who presented with reactivation of LPP in addition to LP. Tofacitinib decrease the number of T cell infiltration and adjust IFN expression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lichen Planus , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Lichen Planus/diagnosis , Lichen Planus/drug therapy , Lichen Planus/etiology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Skin Appendage Disord ; 8(3): 195-199, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582862

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic of COVID-19 has several implications for patients with chronic stress-sensitive diseases such as alopecia areata (AA). On the other hand, the vulnerability of AA patients using immunosuppressives to a more severe infection is in the shadow of ambiguity. This teledermatology study aimed to evaluate the course and outcome of AA in patients during this challenging period. Methods: Patients with AA who had previously received systemic therapy included in this study. Information about demographic data, AA history, characteristics, and treatments, hair loss progression, Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS), adherence to protective measures against the COVID-19, possible infection, and its features obtained via a telephone call. Results: A total of 57 patients participated. The majority (84.2%) of the participants had mild anxiety assessed by CDAS. Two patients (3.5%) had got infected with COVID-19. Twenty-one (36.8%) participants experienced hair loss progression. Hair loss progression correlated with drug dose reduction (OR: 46.09, 95% CI 5.48-387.14, p < 0.001) although it did not influence by the level of anxiety evaluated by the CDAS (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The anxiety perceived by severe AA patients about COVID-19 is mild; however, many experience hair loss progressions owing to their drug dose reduction.

6.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(2): 420-425, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, multiple studies showed higher rates of severe infection in adults and specifically in male patients, which may be related to differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is one of the AR expression manifestations. AIM: To explore AGA severity as a possible risk factor for COVID-19 severity in hospitalized patients. METHODS: A total of 164 subjects (116 men and 48 females) with confirmed COVID-19 in need of hospitalization were included in this study. An experienced dermatologist examined the correlation of clinical signs of COVID-19 severity with AGA types. For evaluation of the association between categorical variables and comparison of the mean age in three groups of COVID-19 patients, the Fisher's exact test and the analysis of variance were used. RESULTS: Our cross-sectional study included 116 male patients (70.7%) with a median age of 65.5 (age range: 22-97) years. Among them, 13.8% required intubation, 15.5% needed intensive care unit (ICU) care, and 70.7% required inward hospitalization. The Hamilton-Norwood Scale (HNS) was as follows: HNS I 14.7%, HNS II 12.1%, HNS III 20.7%, HNS IV 19.8%, HNS IV 29.8%, HNS V 17.2%, HNS VI 13.8%, and HNS VII 1.7%. Also, 29.3% of the patients were female, possessing a median age of 72 (age range: 23-98) years. In this group, 8.3% required intubation, 6.3% required ICU care, and 85.4% needed inpatient ward admission care. The Ludwig Scale (LS) was as follows: LS I 52.1%, LS II 35.4%, and LS III 12.5%. CONCLUSION: The severity of AGA type did not correlate with the severity of COVID-19 among hospitalized patients. Our results were in contrast with other research that suggested AGA severity as a marker of unfavorable outcomes of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alopecia/epidemiology , Androgens , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
7.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(4): e15004, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242158

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become the most emerging health issue globally. A prompt investigation regarding disease management and treatment is crucial for decreasing the burden of the disease. Many explorations and hypotheses have been posed, but the definite treatment has not been determined for COVID-19. Recent studies described a substantial prevalence of COVID-19 and also a higher rate of morbidity and mortality in men afflicted with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The gender-related discordance in COVID-19 infection may be due to hormonal differences, socioeconomic factors, genetic susceptibility, gender-related comorbidities, and habits like alcohol consumption. On the other hand, several studies proposed that androgens could improve the immune system and have a protective role in COVID-19, and decreased levels of androgens might be associated with unsatisfactory outcomes. In the field of dermatology, androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is correlated with a hyperandrogenic state and may be related to COVID-19 severity. Furthermore, recent research has assessed the plausible association of AGA and COVID-19. In this review, we investigate all evidence on AGA and its relationship with COVID-19, including the possible role of androgens in COVID-19 severity and outcomes as well as candidate androgen-related drugs for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Androgens , COVID-19 , Alopecia/drug therapy , Alopecia/epidemiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
9.
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