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1.
Medical Sciences Forum ; 13(1):25, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2155212

ABSTRACT

The adverse impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic reinforced and magnified issues of sexual assault and harassment (SASH) with consequences on seafarers' mental health and wellbeing which in turn negatively affects recruitment and attrition rates of seafarers. The Center for Ocean Policy & Economics (COPE) hosted by the Northeast Maritime Institute's College of Maritime Science, which was established to tackle wicked problems in the maritime and ocean related fields, established a working group to aid the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to amend and develop training for SASH in IMO Model Course 1.21 Personnel Safety and Social Responsibilities. The working group facilitates global participation through digital accessibility to ensure diverse viewpoints on SASH in the maritime sector.

2.
Medical Sciences Forum ; 13(1):24, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2155211

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated many underlying issues regarding seafarers in the maritime industry, known as the 'human element';at the International Maritime Organization. The challenges were a result of a global crew change crisis and issues with repatriation as a result of travel lockdowns, pay insecurity, mental health challenges, lack of digital access, and flaws within the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) that resulted in serious questions of liability and rights and responsibilities for seafarers. The Center for Ocean Policy & Economics (COPE), hosted by the Northeast Maritime Institute's College of Maritime Science, observed and participated in several initiatives to promote human rights at sea to improve the livelihood of seafarers. The initiatives underscore pathways and methods of improvement for maritime and ocean related issues.

3.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S1608-S1608, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2129916
4.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 235(5):S268-S269, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107614
5.
Diabetic Medicine ; 39(SUPPL 1):67, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1868619

ABSTRACT

Aims: • Covid-19 infection is associated with new-onset diabetes and worse glucose control in pre-existing diabetes. • During the pandemic, our hospital experienced a rise in diabetic specialist-nurse (DSN) referrals similar to across the UK. • The existing DSN referral-form was time-consuming to complete and difficult to interpret. A new form was created to facilitate earlier DSN involvement to reduce delays in treatment. Methods: • The new form was piloted on 3 hospital wards. • The completion of 10 factors (addressograph, location, type of diabetes, referral reason, oral intake, HbA1c, e-GFR, oral and injectable diabetes medication and referrer details) were compared between 25 old and 25 new forms. • Data were analysed using SPSS 27. Results: New forms demonstrated significantly higher completion of 4 parameters compared to old forms: location (96% vs. 76%, p = 0.01), type of diabetes (92% vs. 32%, p < 0.001), e-GFR (60% vs. 16%, p = 0.001), referrer details (100% vs. 44%, p < 0.001). A positive trend was identified for: oral intake (52% vs. 48%), HbA1c (40% vs. 20%), oral diabetes medication (56% vs. 48%), injectable diabetes medications (88% vs. 72%) when comparing new vs. old forms respectively. Referral reason was completed in 88% of new forms and 96% of old forms. All forms had an addressograph. Conclusions: The new referral-form improved documentation of factors required to effectively prioritise patients. We aim to distribute the form across our hospital wards. Future work will focus on educating clinicians regarding indications for DSN input and importance of biochemical parameters to guide choice of hypoglycaemic agents.

9.
ESMO Open ; 7(1): 100374, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the well-being and job performance of oncology professionals globally. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Resilience Task Force collaboration set out to investigate and monitor well-being since COVID-19 in relation to work, lifestyle and support factors in oncology professionals 1 year on since the start of the pandemic. METHODS: An online, anonymous survey was conducted in February/March 2021 (Survey III). Key outcome variables included risk of poor well-being or distress (expanded Well-Being Index), feeling burnout (single item from expanded Well-Being Index), and job performance since COVID-19. Longitudinal analysis of responses to the series of three surveys since COVID-19 was carried out, and responses to job demands and resources questions were interrogated. SPSS V.26.0/V.27.0 and GraphPad Prism V9.0 were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Responses from 1269 participants from 104 countries were analysed in Survey III: 55% (n = 699/1269) female, 54% (n = 686/1269) >40 years, and 69% (n = 852/1230) of white ethnicity. There continues to be an increased risk of poor well-being or distress (n = 464/1169, 40%) and feeling burnout (n = 660/1169, 57%) compared with Survey I (25% and 38% respectively, P < 0.0001), despite improved job performance. Compared with the initial period of the pandemic, more participants report feeling overwhelmed with workload (45% versus 29%, P < 0.0001). There remain concerns about the negative impact of the pandemic on career development/training (43%), job security (37%). and international fellowship opportunities (76%). Alarmingly, 25% (n = 266/1086) are considering changing their future career with 38% (n = 100/266) contemplating leaving the profession. CONCLUSION: Oncology professionals continue to face increased job demands. There is now significant concern regarding potential attrition in the oncology workforce. National and international stakeholders must act immediately and work closely with oncology professionals to draw up future-proof recovery plans.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Medical Oncology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Societies, Medical
12.
Pediatric Cardiology ; 42(8):1923-1923, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1515977
13.
ESMO Open ; 6(4): 100199, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant changes to professional and personal lives of oncology professionals globally. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Resilience Task Force collaboration aimed to provide contemporaneous reports on the impact of COVID-19 on the lived experiences and well-being in oncology. METHODS: This online anonymous survey (July-August 2020) is the second of a series of global surveys launched during the course of the pandemic. Longitudinal key outcome measures including well-being/distress (expanded Well-being Index-9 items), burnout (1 item from expanded Well-being Index), and job performance since COVID-19 were tracked. RESULTS: A total of 942 participants from 99 countries were included for final analysis: 58% (n = 544) from Europe, 52% (n = 485) female, 43% (n = 409) ≤40 years old, and 36% (n = 343) of non-white ethnicity. In July/August 2020, 60% (n = 525) continued to report a change in professional duties compared with the pre-COVID-19 era. The proportion of participants at risk of poor well-being (33%, n = 310) and who reported feeling burnout (49%, n = 460) had increased significantly compared with April/May 2020 (25% and 38%, respectively; P < 0.001), despite improved job performance since COVID-19 (34% versus 51%; P < 0.001). Of those who had been tested for COVID-19, 8% (n = 39/484) tested positive; 18% (n = 7/39) felt they had not been given adequate time to recover before return to work. Since the pandemic, 39% (n = 353/908) had expressed concerns that COVID-19 would have a negative impact on their career development or training and 40% (n = 366/917) felt that their job security had been compromised. More than two-thirds (n = 608/879) revealed that COVID-19 has changed their outlook on their work-personal life balance. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the well-being of oncology professionals globally, with significantly more in distress and feeling burnout compared with the first wave. Collective efforts from both national and international communities addressing support and coping strategies will be crucial as we recover from the COVID-19 crisis. In particular, an action plan should also be devised to tackle concerns raised regarding the negative impact of COVID-19 on career development, training, and job security.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1130-S1131, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432855

ABSTRACT

Background: The ESMO Resilience Task Force has investigated wellbeing since COVID-19 in relation to work, lifestyle and support factors in oncology professionals globally. We reported on the significant impact of the initial surge of the pandemic on wellbeing and job performance (Banerjee et al. 2021). As the pandemic continues, it is imperative to understand experiences and concerns to better inform support measures for the oncology workforce. Methods: Three anonymous online surveys were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic (S1, Apr/May 2020;S2, Jul/Aug 2020;S3, Feb/Mar 2021). Longitudinal analysis of responses at these timepoints were conducted. Here, we present responses to questions on job demands and resources, and perceived job performance since COVID-19 (JP-CV). Results: We analysed 3894 individual responses (S1, n=1520;S2, n=942;S3, n=1432): 53% (n=1961/3731) female, 45% (n=1679/3731) =/<40 years, 31% (n=1132/3692) non-white ethnicity, >100 countries. There has been significant increases from S1 to S3 (p<0.001) in feeling overwhelmed with workload (29% vs 45%);COVID-19-related clinical (14% vs 58%) and research (16% vs 64%) work;out-of-hours work (16% vs 41%), shift work (12% vs 26%) and overall working hours (17% vs 47%);and inadequate time for personal/family life (35% vs 45%). 59% (n=1156/1946) were unable to take allocated annual leave. While JP-CV has improved (34% vs 49%, p<0.001), there remained concerns about the negative impact of the pandemic on career development/training (43%), job security (37%) and international fellowship opportunities (76%). Overall, less than half had felt supported by their work management, professional societies or government, and/or had access to wellbeing support services. 25% (n=266/1086) were considering changing their future career with 38% (n=100/266) contemplating leaving the profession. Conclusions: Since COVID-19, oncology professionals have reported increased job demands, concerns over career development/training and job security, and inadequate time for personal life. There is a real threat of potential attrition in the current workforce. National and international stakeholders must act together to ensure robust recovery plans as we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding: ESMO. Disclosure: K.H.J. Lim: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker honorarium: Janssen;Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Trainees committee representative for the North West deanery: Royal College of Physicians (UK);Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Trainees representative at the RCP Patient Safety Committee: Royal College of Physicians (UK);Non-Financial Interests, Officer, ACP representative at the RCP Student and Foundation Doctor Network (SFDN): Royal College of Physicians (UK);Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Trainees committee member: Association of Cancer Physicians (ACP) UK;Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Young Oncologists Committee (YOC): ESMO;Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Resilience Task Force (RTF): ESMO;Other, Currently funded by Wellcome-Imperial 4i Clinical Research Fellowship: Wellcome Trust. K. Punie: Other, Institutional, Other, institution received speaker fees or honoraria for consultancy/advisory roles: AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, Gilead Sciences, Medscape, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre, Hoffmann La Roche, Mundi Pharma, PharmaMar, Teva, Vifor Pharma;Other, Institutional, Research Grant: Sanofi;Other, Personal, Other, Travel support: AstraZeneca, Novartis, Pfizer, PharmaMar and Roche. C. Oing: Other, Personal, Other, research funding and honoraria: Roche;Other, Personal, Other, travel grant and honoraria: Medac Pharma and Ipsen Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, travel grant: PharmaMar. E. Elez: Other, Personal, Other, personal fees: Hoffman La - Roche, Bristol Myers Squibb, Servier, Amgen, Merck Serono, ArrayBiopharma, Sanof. T.M.S. Amaral: Other, Personal, Other, personal fees: Pierre Fabre and CeCaVa;Other, Personal, Other, personal fees and travel grants: BMS;Other, Perso al, Other, grants, personal fees and travel grants: Novartis;Other, Personal, Other, grants: Neracare, Sanofi and SkylineDx. P. Garrido Lopez: Other, Personal, Other, personal fees: Roche, MSD, BMS, Boerhinger-Ingelheim, Pfizer, AbbVie, Novartis, Lilly, AstraZeneca, Janssen, Blueprint Medicines, Takeda, Gilead, and ROVI. M. Lambertini: Other, Personal, Other, Consultant: Roche, AstraZeneca, Lilly and Novartis;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Theramex, Roche, Novartis, Takeda, Pfizer, Sandoz, and Lilly. C.B. Westphalen: Other, Personal, Other, honoraria, travel support and advisory board: Bayer, BMS, Celgene, Roche, Servier, Shire/Baxalta, RedHil, and Taiho;Other, Personal, Other, speaker honoraria: Ipsen;Other, Personal, Advisory Board: GSK, Sirtex, and Rafael. J.B.A.G. Haanen: Other, Personal, Advisory Role, personal fees for advisory role: Neogene Tx;Other, Institutional, Other, grants and fees paid to institution: BMS, MSD, Novartis, BioNTech, Amgen;Other, Institutional, Other, fees paid to institution: Achilles Tx, GSK, Immunocore, Ipsen, Merck Serono, Molecular Partners, Pfizer, Roche/Genentech, Sanofi, Seattle Genetics, Third Rock Ventures, Vaximm. C. Hardy: Other, Personal, Other, Director of a private company Hardy People Ltd.: Hardy People Ltd. S. Banerjee: Other, Institutional, Research Grant: AstraZeneca, Tesaro and GSK;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Amgen, AstraZeneca, MSD, GSK, Clovis, Genmab, Merck Serono, Mersana, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics, and Tesaro. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

15.
Photonics ; 8(8):342, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1376942

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has made it abundantly clear that the state-of-the-art biosensors may not be adequate for providing a tool for rapid mass testing and population screening in response to newly emerging pathogens. The main limitations of the conventional techniques are their dependency on virus-specific receptors and reagents that need to be custom-developed for each recently-emerged pathogen, the time required for this development as well as for sample preparation and detection, the need for biological amplification, which can increase false positive outcomes, and the cost and size of the necessary equipment. Thus, new platform technologies that can be readily modified as soon as new pathogens are detected, sequenced, and characterized are needed to enable rapid deployment and mass distribution of biosensors. This need can be addressed by the development of adaptive, multiplexed, and affordable sensing technologies that can avoid the conventional biological amplification step, make use of the optical and/or electrical signal amplification, and shorten both the preliminary development and the point-of-care testing time frames. We provide a comparative review of the existing and emergent photonic biosensing techniques by matching them to the above criteria and capabilities of preventing the spread of the next global pandemic.

16.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339385

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) infection and a diagnosis of cancer are at high risk of severe symptomatic disease (COVID-19) and death. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies, to estimate the case-fatality rate (CFR) of patients with solid or hematological tumors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: A systematic search of PubMed library up to 31 January, 2021, was performed in order to identify publications reporting the CFR among adult patients with solid or hematological tumors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. CFR was defined as the rate of deaths among SARS-CoV-2-positive cancer patients. Moreover, we separately assessed the CFR among patients with lung and breast cancer. Studies with at least 10 patients were included. The CFR was assessed through a random effect model, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The Higgins I2 index was computed to assess the heterogeneity between studies. Results: The systematic search of the literaturereturned 1,727studies. 1,551 were excluded on the basis of the title, 29 based on the abstract, and 3 were duplicates. A total of 144 studies were selected, including 35,725 patients with solid or hematological tumors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. In total, 46 and 32 studies reported the CFR among COVID-19 patients with lung (total N = 1,555) and breast (total N = 1.398) cancer, respectively. Overall, the CFR was 25.5% (95% CI 23.1%-28.1%, Egger test p < 0.001). A sensitivity analysis, after excluding studies with less than 100 patients, showed a CFR of 22.1% (95% CI 19.4%-25.2%). The CFR among patients with lung cancer and SARSCoV2 infection was 33.4% (95% CI 28.1%-39.6%) when including all studies and 26.3% (95% CI 17.6%-39.2%) at the sensitivity analysis after excluding studies with less than 100 patients. The CFR among patients with breast cancer and SARS-CoV2 infection was 13.7% (95% CI 9.1%-20.7%) when including all studies and 13.0% (95% CI 7.6%-22.1%) at the sensitivity analysis after excluding studies with less than 100 patients. Conclusions: One year after the outbreak of the pandemic, this large metaanalysis reports the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with cancer. This population experienced a high probability of mortality, with a comparatively higher CFR in patients with lung cancer, and a comparatively lower CFR in patients with breast cancer. Patients with an underlying diagnosis of cancer require special attention with aggressive preventive measures that also include early access to COVID-19 vaccination.

17.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339340

ABSTRACT

Background: The oncology community is embracing social media (SM) platforms like Twitter to gain exposure to research, to network, and to engage in real-time discussions. The emergence of SM activity around the ASCO annual meetings has dramatically increased over the past 5 years, with factors such as the COVID-19 pandemic further accelerating use of digital platforms. This growth in SM engagement within the oncology community has previously been presented by totaling the quantity of tweets within a given time frame. Here, we explore the impact of specific trends through impression data. Methods: To evaluate activity trends among certain oncology stakeholders, we utilized an SM analytics platform, Symplur, to conduct a content analysis around ASCO conferences (2016-2020) using hashtags (#ASCOyy) as the search criterion. We focused our analysis on trends in impressions, defined by the theoretical maximum number of Twitter users a given tweet could have directly reached in a follower's timeline. We gathered impressions data to quantitatively assess overall ASCO engagement and evaluate topics of interest, and to discover common ASCO themes and reach within specific stakeholder groups. Results: Our results show the largest increase in impressions was during #ASCO20, despite a plateauing effect seen in the actual number of tweets (Table). The cumulative number of impressions for #ASCO16 was 468.2 million compared with approximately 1.12 billion for #ASCO20. Differentiating this result from the number of tweets related to ASCO, there was stabilization in the absolute number from #ASCO17 onward. When compiling impressions by doctors and by patient advocates, a similar trend emerged, with the most impressions captured during #ASCO20 (Table). Conclusions:As SM use continues to expand in the oncology community, stakeholders have turned to their digital voice to express views and opinions. The impact of impressions versus absolute number of tweets will continue to grow with a stakeholder's follower count, thus building on the digital presence in oncology.

18.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):42, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238417

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hypoglycaemia has manifold potential aetiologies, from environmental to iatrogenic, presenting in isolation to as part of syndrome, from insulin excess to defects in endogenous pathways, and simple Mendelian to complex modes of inheritance. We investigated 3 patients with Hypoglycaemic Episodes (HE) in December 2020 in a District General Hospital. Case series: • A 27-year- old man without co-morbidities presenting with neuroglycopaenic symptoms and HE, with a family history of maternal neuroendocrine tumour. During the 72-hour fast, patient developed hypoglycaemia (1.8 mmol/L) with inappropriately raised c-peptides (718 nmol/L) and insulin (25.7 pmol/L) levels. MRI pancreas demonstrated 1-cm lesion in tail. MRI pituitary was normal in spite of raised prolactin (687 mIU/L). Started on Diazoxide, he is awaiting pancreatic surgery and genetic testing. • A 85-year- old woman with heart failure presented with hypothermia, hypotension and hypoglycaemia (1.4 mmol/L). Treated for urosepsis with normal 9 am cortisol, fasting HE persisted. Medication review led to sacubitril as rare cause for HE. This was proven on resolution of HE on stopping of culprit agent. • A 67-year- old woman, type 1 diabetic for 50 years with dementia, referred for severe HE throughout 24 hours. Normal 9 am cortisol ruled out Addison's and clinical examination ruled out lipoatrophy/hypertrophy. Though erratic diet accounted for HE, district nurse administration made BD mix insulin imperative. Careful written dietary guidance with carer supervision was introduced to avoid life-threatening HE. Conclusion: Hypoglycaemia affects life and livelihood with varying aetiologies. Thus we should always be on the lookout for causes and think outside the box.

19.
ESMO Open ; 6(2): 100104, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all aspects of modern-day oncology, including how stakeholders communicate through social media. We surveyed oncology stakeholders in order to assess their attitudes pertaining to social media and how it has been affected during the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 40-item survey was distributed to stakeholders from 8 July to 22 July 2020 and was promoted through the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the OncoAlert Network. RESULTS: One thousand and seventy-six physicians and stakeholders took part in the survey. In total, 57.3% of respondents were medical oncologists, 50.6% aged <40 years, 50.8% of female gender and mostly practicing in Europe (51.5%). More than 90% of respondents considered social media a useful tool for distributing scientific information and for education. Most used social media to stay up to date on cancer care in general (62.5%) and cancer care during COVID-19 (61%) given the constant flow of information. Respondents also used social media to interact with other oncologists (78.8%) and with patients (34.4%). Overall, 61.1% of respondents were satisfied with the role that social media was playing during the COVID-19 pandemic. On the other hand, 41.1% of respondents reported trouble in discriminating between credible and less credible information and 30% stated social networks were a source of stress. For this reason, one-third of respondents reduced its use during the COVID-19 pandemic. Regarding meeting attendance, a total of 59.1% of responding physicians preferred in-person meetings to virtual ones, and 51.8% agreed that virtual meetings and social distancing could hamper effective collaboration. CONCLUSION: Social media has a useful role in supporting cancer care and professional engagement in oncology. Although one-third of respondents reported reduced use of social media due to stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority found social media useful to keep up to date and were satisfied with the role social media was playing during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oncologists , Social Media , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Female , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Medical Oncology/education , Middle Aged , Oncologists/psychology , Social Networking , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
20.
ESMO Open ; 6(2): 100058, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on well-being has the potential for serious negative consequences on work, home life, and patient care. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Resilience Task Force collaboration set out to investigate well-being in oncology over time since COVID-19. METHODS: Two online anonymous surveys were conducted (survey I: April/May 2020; survey II: July/August 2020). Statistical analyses were performed to examine group differences, associations, and predictors of key outcomes: (i) well-being/distress [expanded Well-being Index (eWBI; 9 items)]; (ii) burnout (1 item from eWBI); (iii) job performance since COVID-19 (JP-CV; 2 items). RESULTS: Responses from survey I (1520 participants from 101 countries) indicate that COVID-19 is impacting oncology professionals; in particular, 25% of participants indicated being at risk of distress (poor well-being, eWBI ≥ 4), 38% reported feeling burnout, and 66% reported not being able to perform their job compared with the pre-COVID-19 period. Higher JP-CV was associated with better well-being and not feeling burnout (P < 0.01). Differences were seen in well-being and JP-CV between countries (P < 0.001) and were related to country COVID-19 crude mortality rate (P < 0.05). Consistent predictors of well-being, burnout, and JP-CV were psychological resilience and changes to work hours. In survey II, among 272 participants who completed both surveys, while JP-CV improved (38% versus 54%, P < 0.001), eWBI scores ≥4 and burnout rates were significantly higher compared with survey I (22% versus 31%, P = 0.01; and 35% versus 49%, P = 0.001, respectively), suggesting well-being and burnout have worsened over a 3-month period during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: In the first and largest global survey series, COVID-19 is impacting well-being and job performance of oncology professionals. JP-CV has improved but risk of distress and burnout has increased over time. Urgent measures to address well-being and improve resilience are essential.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncologists/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Female , Health Surveys , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Remote Consultation
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