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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-331764

ABSTRACT

Background: The Go To Travel campaign in Japan was launched to subsidize travel and accommodation costs for tourists through vouchers that could be used at domestic destinations. We examined the relationship between using Go To Travel and infection prevention behaviors. Methods: : We conducted a cross-sectional study of 26,637 workers who responded to a large-scale questionnaire survey about COVID-19 under the pandemic in Japan. We undertook logistic regression analysis. Results: : Among the 26,637 participants, 7,959 (30%) used Go To Travel. Compared with non-Go To Travel users, we observed statistically significant differences in multivariate analysis with Go To travel users for the following: gargling (odds ratio [OR], 0.91;95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87–0.97;P = .001);room ventilation (OR, 0.94;95% CI, 0.88–0.99;P = .017);and washing hands (OR, 0.94;95% CI, 0.89–1.00;P = .036). Conclusions: : We observed the tendency for Go To Travel users not to implement some infection prevention behaviors. It is necessary to continue the encouragement of applying infection prevention behaviors: implementing such travel support policies as Go To Travel during COVID-19 could spread the risk of infection. Trial registration: Not applicable

2.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12317, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680224

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of workers being diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and being identified as close contacts of infected persons with unemployment in Japan. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study using questionnaires about COVID-19 administered to Japanese workers. A baseline survey conducted on December 22-25, 2020, was used to determine history of being diagnosed with COVID-19 or being identified as a close contact of an infected person. Unemployment since the baseline survey was ascertained with a follow-up survey on February 18 and 19, 2021. The odds ratios (ORs) of unemployment were estimated using a multilevel logistic model with adjusted covariates nested in prefecture of residence. RESULTS: Women (n = 8771) accounted for 44% of the total sample (n = 19 941), and the mean age was 48.0 years. In terms of unemployment because of negative reasons, the multivariate analysis showed that the OR of unemployment associated with being diagnosed with COVID-19 was 2.40 (95% CI: 1.15-5.01) and that the OR associated with being identified as a close contact was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.31-3.11). CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between workers being diagnosed with COVID-19 and unemployment. The reason is not clear, but if the unemployment is unwanted by the individual, workplace adjustment may help prevent unwilling unemployment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Unemployment , Workplace
3.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12308, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589270

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between perceived organizational support (POS) and COVID-19 vaccination intention as well as the influence of the implementation of workplace infection prevention measures. METHODS: We analyzed data from an Internet survey of workers aged 20-65 years conducted in December 2020, during a period of widespread COVID-19 infection in Japan. RESULTS: Of the 23 846 participants in this survey, 1958 (8%) reported very high POS. In the group with very high POS, 836 (43%) workers wanted the COVID-19 vaccination; in contrast 1382 (36%) workers in the group with very low POS wanted the vaccination. POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (odds ratio [OR] = 1.11). The OR decreased after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.06). In the analysis with POS as a categorical variable, very high POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (reference: very low POS) (OR = 1.34). The OR decreased after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.17). High POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (OR = 1.17) but not with vaccination intention after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.05). CONCLUSIONS: High POS during the COVID-19 pandemic increased employees' vaccination intention. The relationship between POS and vaccination intention was strongly influenced by implementation of workplace infection prevention measures. Implementing appropriate workplace infection prevention measures in the event of an emerging infectious disease outbreak may influence the vaccination behavior of employees, which may contribute to the acquisition of herd immunity in the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Intention , Organizational Culture , Vaccination , Workplace , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology , Young Adult
4.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295529

ABSTRACT

The 2020/2021 seasonal influenza vaccination was carried out under unique situations during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Examining the factors affecting vaccine inoculation in a pandemic situation may provide valuable insights. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the 2020/2021 seasonal influenza vaccine intake. A cross-sectional study was conducted on workers aged 20–65 years on December 22–25, 2020, using data from an Internet survey. We set the presence or absence of 2020/2021 seasonal influenza vaccination as the dependent variable, and each aspect of sociodemographic factors, including gender, age, marital status, education, annual household income, and underlying disease, as independent variables. We performed a multilevel logistic regression analysis nested by residence. In total, 26,637 respondents (13,600 men, 13,037 women) participated, and a total of 11,404 individuals (42.8%) received the 2020/2021 influenza vaccine. Significantly more women than men were vaccinated, and the vaccination rate was higher among younger adults, married people, highly educated people, high-income earners, and those with underlying disease. The current results suggested that the relationship between seasonal influenza vaccination behavior and sociodemographic factors differed from the results reported in previous studies in terms of age. These findings suggest that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, young people may have become more aware of the risk of contracting influenza and of the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine. In addition, information interventions may have had a positive effect.

5.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295528

ABSTRACT

Background Restricting the movement of the public to gathering places and limiting close physical contact are effective measures against COVID-19 infection. In Japan, states of emergency have been declared in specific prefectures to reduce public movement and control COVID-19 transmission. We investigated how familiarity with the COVID-19 infection affected self-restraint related to outing behaviors during state of emergency declarations in Japan. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among workers aged 20–65 years using data from an internet survey. The baseline survey was conducted on December 22–25, 2020, and a follow-up survey was on February 18–19, 2021. There were 19,941 participants who completed both surveys and were included in the final analysis. We set self-restraint regarding outing behaviors after the second state of emergency was declared in January 2021 as the dependent variable, and levels of familiarity with COVID-19 infection as independent variables. Odds ratios were estimated using multilevel logistic analyses. Results Significant differences by familiarity with COVID-19 infection were identified: compared with people without a history of COVID-19 or close contact with cases of confirmed COVID-19, and those whose acquaintances had not been diagnosed with COVID-19, people with a history of COVID-19 did not refrain from most outing behaviors. People with an acquaintance diagnosed with COVID-19 were significantly more likely to refrain from most outing behaviors. There was no significant difference in any outing behavior for people with a history of close contact only. Conclusions To maximize the effect of emergency declarations, health authorities should disseminate information for each person in the target population, taking into account potential differences related to the familiarity with the infection.

6.
Ind Health ; 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523651

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of infection, it is necessary for each individual to adopt infection prevention behavior. We investigated the effect of infection control measures implemented in the workplace on personal infection prevention behavior. We conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey through the Internet from December 22 to 25, 2020, during which period coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was spreading. Among respondents aged 20 to 65 years (n=27,036), 21,915 workers were included in the analysis. The results showed that as the number of infection control measures in the workplace increased, implementation of infection prevention behavior by individuals also significantly increased. However, the relationship differed depending on the type of personal infection prevention behavior. Specifically, infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace may affect personal infection prevention behavior. Implementation of infection control measures in the workplace increases awareness of the importance of individual infection prevention behavior and its implementation by all individuals. These findings may be applicable not only to COVID-19 measures but also to responses to other emerging infections and seasonal influenza.

7.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(9): e631-e635, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398174

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between worry about COVID-19 infection in the workplace and while commuting to work and psychological distress in Japan. METHODS: An internet monitor study was conducted. Out of a total of 33,302 participants, 26,841 people were included. The subjects were asked single-item questions about whether they were worried about COVID-19 infection in general, at work and while commuting to work. K6 was used to assess psychological distress. RESULTS: The OR was significantly higher in association with worry about infection in the workplace at 1.71 (95%CI 1.53 to 1.92) and worry about infection while commuting at 1.49 (95%CI 1.32 to 1.67). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the need for psychological intervention to reduce worry about infection in response to public mental health challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Transportation
8.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): 907-912, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337295

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the relationship between the intensity of home-based telework and work engagement. METHODS: This cross-sectional study using a self-administrated questionnaire survey was conducted from December 22 to 25, 2020, in Japan. The subjects were asked single-item questions about the intensity of telework and three-item questions about work engagement using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Coefficients were estimated using a multilevel regression model nested by the prefecture of residence and adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: High-intensity (4 or more days per week) telework was not associated with high work engagement for men or women. In contrast, low and moderate intensity (3 days per week to once per month) were associated with high work engagement. The results were consistent when stratified by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Reasonable-intensity telework may have beneficial effects on work engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleworking , Work Engagement
10.
J UOEH ; 43(2): 217-225, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257104

ABSTRACT

The ever-changing social implications of the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in an urgent need to understand the working environments and health status of workers. We conducted a nationwide Internet-based health survey of Japanese workers in December 2020, in the midst the country's "third wave" of COVID-19 infection. Of 33,087 surveys collected, 6,051 were determined to have invalid responses. The 27,036 surveys included in the study were balanced in terms of geographical area, sex of participants, and type of work, according to the sampling plan. Men were more likely than women to have telecommuted, while women were more likely to have resigned since April 2020. Forty percent and 9.1% of respondents had a K6 score of 5 or higher and 13 or higher, respectively, and they did not exhibit extremely poor health. The present study describes the protocol used to conduct an Internet-based health survey of workers and a summary of its results during a period when COVID-19 was spreading rapidly in Japan. In the future, we plan to use this survey to examine the impact of COVID-19 on workers' work styles and health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Status , Health Surveys/methods , Internet , Occupational Health , Teleworking/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Sex Factors , Time Factors
11.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12198, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059413

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The health effects of telework, which was introduced extensively in the immediate context of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis in Japan, on teleworkers, their families, and non-teleworkers, are unknown. Accordingly, we developed a rapid health impact assessment (HIA) to evaluate positive and negative health effects of telework on these groups and recommended easily implementable countermeasures. METHODS: Immediately after an emergency was declared in Japan, we implemented a rapid, five-step HIA. We screened and categorized health effects of telework for the three above-mentioned groups, extracting their content, directionality, and likelihood. Following a scoping exercise to determine the HIA's overall implementation, five experienced occupational health physicians appraised and prioritized the screened items and added new items. We outlined specific countermeasures and disseminated the results on our website. A short-term evaluation was conducted by three external occupational health physicians and three nurses. RESULTS: Following screening and appraisal, 59, 29, and 27 items were listed for teleworkers, non-teleworkers, and family members of teleworkers, respectively, covering work, lifestyle, disease and medical care, and home and community. Targeted countermeasures focused on the work environment, business management, communications, and lifestyles for teleworkers; safety and medical guidelines, work prioritization, and regular communication for non-teleworkers; and shared responsibilities within families and communication outside families for family members of teleworkers. CONCLUSION: The HIA's validity and the countermeasures' practical applicability were confirmed by the external evaluators. They can be easily applied and adapted across diverse industries to mitigate the wider negative effects of telework and enhance its positive effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Impact Assessment , Occupational Health , Teleworking , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Computer Security , Exercise , Family , Health Impact Assessment/methods , Health Status , Humans , Japan , Life Style , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Time Management , Work/psychology , Workplace/organization & administration
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