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1.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2191396

ABSTRACT

PurposeBased on text content analysis using big data, this study aims to explore differences in guest perceptions of peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 to provide suggestions for the development of these properties in China postpandemic. Design/methodology/approachA guest perception dictionary was established by collecting Ctrip customer reviews of peer-to-peer accommodations. After data cleaning, thematic word analysis and semantic association network analysis were used to explore perceptions and thematic differences before and after COVID-19. FindingsThis research constructed a multidimensional framework of guest-perceived values for peer-to-peer accommodation in the context of COVID-19. The findings showed that the emphasis on functionality in peer-to-peer accommodation changed;perceived emotional values associated with peer-to-peer stays were more complex;perceived social values decreased, host-guest interactions were reduced and online communication became a stronger trend;tourist preferences for types of experiences changed, and people changed their destination selections;perceived conditional value was reflected in perceived risks, and the perceptions of environmental health, service and physical risks increased. Research limitations/implicationsThis research has constructed a multidimensional framework of tourist perceived value on the basis of peer-to-peer accommodation context and epidemic background and has thus shown the changes in tourist perceived value of peer-to-peer accommodation before and after COVID-19. Originality/valueTo the best of authors' knowledge, this research constitutes the first attempt to explore the perceptual differences for peer-to-peer accommodations before and after COVID-19 based on an extensive data set of online reviews from multiple provinces of China.

2.
Tourism Marketing: In the Age of the Consumer ; : 1-758, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2100179

ABSTRACT

Tourism Marketing: In the Age of the Consumer offers a fresh and contemporary approach as an introductory textbook on tourism marketing. Six major themes along with the traditional core marketing principles are blended together: • Age of the consumer: This book places the customer at the heart of tourism marketing and not the sector’s promotional apparatus. • Experiences: It highlights the growing consumer interest in the enjoyment of experiences and experiential marketing. • New media: Social media and e-marketing are given emphasis throughout. Coverage of new media is present in all chapters. • Global marketplace: Every chapter adopts a global outlook and offers international perspectives. • Environment and social responsibility: An emphasis is placed on the sustainability of tourism, including the concepts of ethical tourism and social responsibility. • Events: This book treats events as a major tourism marketing topic and integrates events within the concept of experiential marketing. Written in an engaging and accessible style, Tourism Marketing: In the Age of the Consumer is richly illustrated and full of actual case studies and examples looking at a wide variety of topics such as slum tourism, the sharing economy, staycations, event bidding, coping with COVID-19, air travel emissions and many more. Four features add interest and bring greater pedagogical value – Quick Bytes, Case Studies, Industry Voices and Vignettes. This will be essential reading for all tourism marketing students. © 2022 Alastair M. Morrison. All rights reserved.

3.
Journal of Tourism Futures ; 8(3):282-297, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2078122

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to examine critically the literature on transformational tourism and explore a research agenda for a post-COVID future. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic review of the transformational tourism literature is performed over a 42-year period from 1978 to 2020. Findings: Further research is required in terms of how transformative experiences should be calibrated and measured both in qualitative and quantitative terms, particularly from the perspective of how tourists are transformed by their experiences. Similarly, the nature and depth of these transformative processes remain poorly understood, particularly given the many different types of tourism associated with transformative experiences, which range from religious pilgrimages to backpacking and include several forms of ecotourism. Practical implications: Future research directions for transformational tourism are discussed with regard to how COVID-19 will transform the dynamics of tourism and travel, including the role of new smart technologies in the creation of enhanced transformational experiences, and the changing expectations and perceptions of transformative travel in the post-COVID era. In addition, the researchers call for future studies on transformational tourism to explore the role of host communities in the delivery of meaningful visitor experiences. Originality/value: Transformational tourism is an emerging body of research, which has attracted a growing level of interest among tourism scholars in recent years. However, to this date, a systematic review of published literature in this field has not been conducted yet in a holistic sense. This paper offers a framework for future research in this field.

4.
Tourism Recreation Research ; : 13, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1882870

ABSTRACT

Tourism destinations are prone to crises and disasters that can cause significant loss and damage, with cities even more exposed to such events due to their complex nature. This was evidenced by the current coronavirus pandemic that had a devastating impact for many city destinations. Yet, this is an area of research that has attracted little attention from academics until recently. This study provides an in-depth systematic review of the research published to date on crises in tourism cities and discusses how this field has evolved over the years. The findings show that while there is a healthy amount of literature on crises in cities and a consistent body of knowledge on tourism crises, cities are somewhat overlooked in the context of tourism crises. Several other imbalances are highlighted regarding the type of crises discussed, regions studied, research methods employed, and topics discussed. Finally, several avenues for future research are proposed.

5.
Critical Care ; 26(SUPPL 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1793845

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 patients are at risk of respiratory deterioration requiring higher level of care. Decisions around timing of intubation and invasive ventilation remain a challenge. NEWS2 is a well-established physiology scoring system used to detect the deteriorating patient [1]. New evidence suggests ROX index may be more reliable than NEWS2 to identify patients at risk of treatment failure of non-invasive respiratory support (NIRS) [2]. Another study has suggested the use of a nomogram for predicting NIRS failure [3]. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from 81 COVID-19 patients admitted to a general critical care unit. Vasopressor use, comorbidities and worst physiological parameters in the first 24 h of instituting NIRS were recorded and used to calculate NEWS2, ROX index, nomogram scores and P/F ratio. NIRS failure, length of therapy and survival status at the end of critical care admission were recorded. Results: Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were calculated for NIRS failure prediction. For nomogram AUROC was 0.701 (95% CI 0.584-0.818) p = 0.0033, ROX index AUROC 0.810 (95% CI 0.708-0.908) p = < 0.0001, NEWS2 AUROC 0.688 (95 CI 0.574-0.802) p = 0.0051, P/F AUROC 0.748 (95% CI 0.638-0.858). Conclusions: ROX index is an easily calculated score and a better predictor of NIRS failure than nomogram, NEWS2 scores and P/F ratio. NEWS2 is not calibrated for this patient population and is not specific for those requiring respiratory support. The ROX index is easier to calculate than a recently developed nomogram [3] and performs better. Patients in respiratory support units (RSU) in the United Kingdom do not have arterial lines sited routinely. ROX-index would therefore be a useful score to help predict treatment failure of NIRS in RSU's and facilitate decision making for escalation of care.

6.
Tourism Review ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1788608

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to investigate the consumer acceptance of robots in hotels before and after COVID-19, with a specific emphasis on whether COVID-19 had a significant effect on the acceptance of robots by hotel guests and whether guests had higher levels of acceptance of hotel robots since the initial COVID-19 outbreak was brought under control in China. Design/methodology/approach: The sample for this research included Chinese hotel guests before and after COVID-19, with 247 responses obtained before its outbreak and a further 601 responses gathered after. Several hypotheses were developed and tested in a pseudo-experimental design. Findings: The results showed that COVID-19 increased hotel guest acceptance of robots. After COVID-19, the perceived importance of the usefulness, social influence, attitude and value of robots increased, while the perceived importance of the ease of use and anthropomorphism of robots decreased. As a contactless service, the usefulness of robots was more valued by customers. This led customers to lower their requirements for the ease of use of robots. In addition, people were more concerned about the social influences on robot use. Research limitations/implications: Hotel guest attitudes and behavioral intentions toward robots and the services they can provide are changing. However, whether this change is purely ephemeral and motivated by a pragmatic stance triggered by COVID-19 remains to be established. Practical implications: The hospitality industry is encouraged to create a new profile of guests in terms of their favorable or unfavorable disposition toward being served by robots. Hotels should consider the deployment of robots according to the demographic characteristics of customers (e.g. according to guest age levels). Originality/value: This research demonstrated that major crises affect customer attitudes and behaviors toward new technologies. COVID-19 resulted in guests paying more attention to the advantages of services offered by hotel robots as a means of reducing the probability of contagion. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

7.
Current Issues in Tourism ; 25(1):150-167, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1721979

ABSTRACT

Although the significance of tourist risk perceptions is well documented, perspectives on risk associated with major pandemics such as COVID-19 remain poorly understood, especially from the viewpoint of destination crisis management. This research measured risk perceptions among Chinese residents related to travelling to Wuhan after the outbreak of COVID-19. Based on the concept and dimensions of tourist risk perceptions, a risk perception scale with 13 items on four dimensions (health, financial, social. performance) was developed and validated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Risk perception differences among visitor groups were identified based on 1818 survey responses collected during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. The results show that occupations and place of residence had significant effects on all 13 items, while gender, age, educational attainment, and income independently affected some items. Similarly, respondent involvement in disease prevention and control, losses suffered during the pandemic, and previous experiences of visiting Wuhan were found to produce significant differences.

8.
Current Issues in Tourism ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1109078

ABSTRACT

The moderation roles of empathy and perceived waiting time (PWT) on post-pandemic travel intentions have not as yet been investigated. This study of 684 Chinese resident respondents elicited how COVID-19 risk messages affected post-pandemic travel intentions. The results showed that people exposed to messages in the risk-amplifying frame had lower basic travel and destination travel intentions than those who were exposed to messages in the risk- attenuating frame. Empathy had a beneficial effect on basic travel intentions and had an inducing effect on destination travel intentions only in high-risk situations. High PWT tourists had more positive destination travel intentions in the risk-attenuating frame. The findings provide a theoretical basis for future research as well as practical implications for destination risk communications and market restoration during a public health crisis. © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

9.
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management ; 46:233-243, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1026141

ABSTRACT

The effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employee safety behavior in crisis situations remains as a gap in the hospitality literature. Based upon the social-influence and conservation of resources theories, this research constructed a theoretical model of hotel CSR's influence on employee safety behavior with belief restoration and negative emotions serving as moderation variables. The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic served as the background, and a questionnaire survey of 23 hotels in China was conducted with 1594 valid responses being received. The results showed that: (1) CSR positively predicted employee safety behavior;CSR had positive influences on safety compliance, participation and adaptation;(2) safety compliance and participation partially mediated the influence of CSR on safety adaptation;and (3) belief restoration positively moderated the relationship between CSR and safety behavior, and negative emotions negatively moderated the relationship between CSR and safety behavior. This research expands the literature coverage on the effectiveness of CSR in a pandemic and hospitality context, as well as being the first to investigate the effect of CSR on employee safety behavior. The CSR practices of hotels are a critical factor in promoting employee safety behavior, mitigating the negative impacts of the crisis, and assisting recovery and future development. © 2020 The Authors

10.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1003879

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the influence of socially- responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on employee fears of external threats during the COVID-19 outbreak, based on social support and event system theories. COVID-19 caused sharp profit declines and bankruptcies of hotels, restaurants and travel agencies. In addition, employees faced threats to their health and job security. How to overcome employee anxieties and fears about the negative impacts of this crisis and promote psychological recovery is worthy of attention from researchers and practitioners. This research investigated the impacts of SRHRM on employee fears through organizational trust, with the COVID-19 pandemic playing a moderating role between SRHRM and employee fears. Design/methodology/approach: The hypotheses were tested through multiple linear regression analysis based on a survey of 408 employees in hospitality and tourism firms in China. Qualitative data were also gathered through interviews with selected managers. Findings: The results showed that SRHRM had a negative influence on employee fears of external threats by enhancing trust in their organizations. In addition, the strength of the COVID-19 pandemic positively moderated the effect of SRHRM on employee fears. When the pandemic strength was more robust, the negative effects of SRHRM on employee fears were more significant. Research limitations/implications: This research illustrated the contribution of SRHRM in overcoming employee fears of external threats in the context of COVID-19. It shed light on the organizational contribution of SRHRM to hospitality and tourism employee psychological recovery during the crisis. Originality/value: This research explored strategic HRM by examining the effects of SRHRM on employee fears in the midst of a severe crisis, specifically COVID-19. The moderation effect of event strength and mediation effect of organizational trust were tested. It is of great value for hospitality and tourism firms to foster employee psychological recovery during a crisis such as COVID-19. © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited.

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