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1.
Lupus Science & Medicine ; 10(1), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2213999

ABSTRACT

Correspondence to Alain Cornet;secretariat@lupus-europe.org During the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, based on limited in vitro and anecdotal clinical data in case series, hydroxychloroquine sulfate (HCQ) has been recommended for treatment of patients with COVID-19 in several countries;1 soon after HCQ was confirmed to be in short supply in several countries raising significant concerns for those who use HCQ for chronic diseases including SLE.2 In April 2020, Lupus Europe (the European federation of lupus patient organisations) launched a survey2 to quantify this access gap, as well as the anxiety expressed by patients confronted with this outage. [...]in countries where shortages were resolved in mid-2020, the patient-reported anxiety about the possible lack of access to HCQ appeared to gradually improve. The case of Poland indicates that, when a new supply issue occurs, even 18 months later, the anxiety level almost immediately jumps back to historical levels, with a high ‘contagion' effect, with even those not experiencing current shortfalls reporting extreme anxiety relating to the availability of their medication. [...]shortages of medicine create an anxiety that can be long-lasting.

2.
Lupus Sci Med ; 9(1)2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We conducted an international survey of patients with SLE to assess their access, preference and trust in various health information sources pre-COVID-19 and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients with SLE were recruited from 18 observational cohorts, and patients self-reporting SLE were recruited through five advocacy organisations. Respondents completed an online survey from June 2020 to December 2021 regarding the sources of health information they accessed in the 12 months preceding (pre-11 March 2020) and during (post-11 March 2020) the pandemic. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed factors associated with accessing news and social media post-11 March 2020, and self-reporting negative impacts from health information accessed through these sources. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 2111 respondents; 92.8% were female, 76.6% had postsecondary education, mean (SD) age was 48.8 (14.0) years. Lupus specialists and family physicians were the most preferred sources pre-11 March 2020 and post-11 March 2020, yet were accessed less frequently (specialists: 78.5% pre vs 70.2% post, difference -8.3%, 95% CI -10.2% to -6.5%; family physicians: 57.1% pre vs 50.0% post, difference -7.1%, 95% CI -9.2% to -5.0%), while news (53.2% pre vs 62.1% post, difference 8.9%, 95% CI 6.7% to 11.0%) and social media (38.2% pre vs 40.6% post, difference 2.4%, 95% CI 0.7% to 4.2%) were accessed more frequently post-11 March 2020 vs pre-11 March 2020. 17.2% of respondents reported negative impacts from information accessed through news/social media. Those outside Canada, older respondents or with postsecondary education were more likely to access news media. Those in Asia, Latin America or younger respondents were more likely to access social media. Those in Asia, older respondents, males or with postsecondary education in Canada, Asia or the USA were less likely to be negatively impacted. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians, the most preferred and trusted sources, were accessed less frequently, while news and social media, less trusted sources, were accessed more frequently post-11 March 2020 vs pre-11 March 2020. Increasing accessibility to physicians, in person and virtually, may help reduce the consequences of accessing misinformation/disinformation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Social Media , Male , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/epidemiology , Mass Media
3.
Rheumatology (Oxford, England) ; 61(Suppl 1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1999061

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims People with inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (I-RMDs) were excluded from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine clinical development programmes;therefore, concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in this population still exist. Previous studies in people with I-RMDs were small albeit reassuring in terms of the incidence of I-RMD flares and adverse events. Our aim was to describe the safety of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 in people with I-RMD. Methods Physician-reported registry of I-RMD and non-inflammatory RMD (NI-RMDs) patients vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. From 5/Feb/2021 to 27/Jul/2021, we collected data on demographics, vaccination, RMD diagnosis, disease activity, immunomodulatory/immunosuppressive treatments, flares, adverse events (AEs) and SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections. Data were analysed descriptively. Results The study included 5121 participants from 30 countries, 90% with I-RMDs (n = 4604, 68% female, mean age 60.5 years) and 10% with NI-RMDs (n = 517, 77% female, mean age 71.4). Inflammatory joint diseases (58%), connective tissue diseases (18%) and vasculitis (12%) were the most frequent diagnostic groups;54% received conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), 42% biologic DMARDs and 35% immunosuppressants. Most patients received the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine (70%), 17% AstraZeneca/Oxford and 8% Moderna. In fully vaccinated cases, breakthrough infections were reported in 0.7% of I-RMD patients and 1.1% of NI-RMD patients. I-RMD flares were reported in 4.4% of cases (0.6% severe), 1.5% resulting in medication changes. AEs were reported in 37% of cases (37% I-RMD, 40% NI-RMD), serious AEs in 0.5% (0.4% I-RMD, 1.9% NI-RMD). Conclusion The safety profiles of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with I-RMD were reassuring, and comparable to patients with NI-RMDs. The majority of patients tolerated their vaccination well with rare reports of I-RMD flare and very rare reports of serious AEs. These findings should provide reassurance to rheumatologists and vaccine recipients, and promote confidence in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine safety in I-RMD patients. Disclosure P.M. Machado: None. S. Lawson-Tovey: None. A. Strangfeld: None. E. Mateus: None. K. Hyrich: None. L. Gossec: None. L. Carmona: None. A. Rodrigues: None. B. Raffeiner: None. C. Duarte: None. E. Hachulla: None. E. Veillard: None. E. Strakova: None. G.R. Burmester: None. G.K. Yardimci: None. J.A. Gómez-Puerta: None. J. Zepa: None. L. Kearsley-Fleet: None. L. Trefond: None. M.M. Cunha: None. M. Mosca: None. M. Cornalba: None. M. Soubrier: None. N. Roux: None. O. Brocq: None. P. Durez: None. R. Conway: None. T. Goulenok: None. J.W.J. Bijlsma: None. I. McInnes: None. X. Mariette: None.

5.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(5): 695-709, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595585

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the safety of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 in people with inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic and musculoskeletal disease (I-RMD). METHODS: Physician-reported registry of I-RMD and non-inflammatory RMD (NI-RMDs) patients vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. From 5 February 2021 to 27 July 2021, we collected data on demographics, vaccination, RMD diagnosis, disease activity, immunomodulatory/immunosuppressive treatments, flares, adverse events (AEs) and SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections. Data were analysed descriptively. RESULTS: The study included 5121 participants from 30 countries, 90% with I-RMDs (n=4604, 68% female, mean age 60.5 years) and 10% with NI-RMDs (n=517, 77% female, mean age 71.4). Inflammatory joint diseases (58%), connective tissue diseases (18%) and vasculitis (12%) were the most frequent diagnostic groups; 54% received conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), 42% biological DMARDs and 35% immunosuppressants. Most patients received the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine (70%), 17% AstraZeneca/Oxford and 8% Moderna. In fully vaccinated cases, breakthrough infections were reported in 0.7% of I-RMD patients and 1.1% of NI-RMD patients. I-RMD flares were reported in 4.4% of cases (0.6% severe), 1.5% resulting in medication changes. AEs were reported in 37% of cases (37% I-RMD, 40% NI-RMD), serious AEs in 0.5% (0.4% I-RMD, 1.9% NI-RMD). CONCLUSION: The safety profiles of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with I-RMD was reassuring and comparable with patients with NI-RMDs. The majority of patients tolerated their vaccination well with rare reports of I-RMD flare and very rare reports of serious AEs. These findings should provide reassurance to rheumatologists and vaccine recipients and promote confidence in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine safety in I-RMD patients.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Rheumatic Diseases , Aged , Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases , Musculoskeletal Diseases/chemically induced , Musculoskeletal Diseases/drug therapy , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Registries , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARDs), vaccination with SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines has been proposed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the immune response elicited by vaccination with mRNA vaccine, testing IgM, IgA and IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) and measuring neutralising antibodies. METHODS: IgG, IgM and IgA anti-RBD antibodies were measured in 101 patients with SARDs. Antibodies inhibiting the interaction between RBD and ACE2 were evaluated. Antibody avidity was tested in a chaotropic ELISA using urea. Twenty-one healthcare workers vaccinated with mRNA vaccine served as control group. RESULTS: Anti-RBD IgG and IgA were produced after the first dose (69% and 64% of the patients) and after the boost (93% and 83%). Antibodies inhibiting the interaction of RBD with ACE2 were detectable in 40% of the patients after the first dose and 87% after boost, compared with 100% in healthy controls (p<0.01). Abatacept and mycophenolate had an impact on the titre of IgG anti-RBD antibodies (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively) and on the amount of neutralising antibodies. No effect of other therapies was observed. Vaccinated patients produce high avidity antibodies, as healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that double-dose vaccination induced in patients with SARDs anti-RBD IgG and IgA antibodies in amounts not significantly different from controls, and, most interestingly, characterised by high avidity and endowed with neutralising activity.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic
7.
Lupus Sci Med ; 8(1)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194228

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a survey exploring the experience of patients with SLE facing hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) shortage that occurred during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey was designed by Lupus Europe's patient advisory network and distributed through its social media, newsflash and members' network. People with lupus were asked about their last HCQ purchases and their level of anxiety (on a 0-10 scale) with regard to not being able to have access to HCQ, once in April 2020 (first wave) and after 11 August (second wave). The results were compared. RESULTS: 2075 patients responded during the first wave; 1001 (48.2%) could get HCQ from the first place they asked, 230 (11.1%) could get the drug by going to more than one pharmacy, 498 (24.0%) obtained HCQ later from their usual pharmacy and 126 (6.1%) from other sources. 188 (9.1%) could not get any; 32 (1.5%) did not respond to this question. All countries showed significant improvement in HCQ availability during the second wave. 562 (27.4%) patients reported an extremely high level of anxiety in wave 1 and 162 (10.3%) patients in wave 2; 589 (28.7%) and 268 (17.1%) patients reported a high level of anxiety in wave 1 and wave 2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The HCQ shortage had a significant impact on patients with SLE and has been responsible for psychological consequences including anxiety. Indeed, despite an objective improvement in drug availability, the event is leaving significant traces in patients' mind and behaviours.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Community Pharmacy Services/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Hydroxychloroquine , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Antirheumatic Agents/supply & distribution , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/standards , Europe/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/supply & distribution , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/epidemiology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/psychology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39(1): 203-213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068449

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of COVID-19, we underlined that this pandemic was a new challenge for rheumatologists. On the one hand, it was necessary to clarify the impact of this new viral disease on the natural history of many rheumatic diseases and, on the other hand, to define the beneficial or harmful effects of the synthetic or targeted therapies used for their treatment. In addition, we have postulated that in view of the common pathogenetic mechanisms involved, the therapeutic armamentarium currently employed in the management of viral or idiopathic systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases could be useful to control the "cytokine storm" induced by SARS-COV-2. One year later, in the present review we have analysed the progress of the knowledge on both these aspects and updated the algorithms initially proposed for a rational use of the synthetic and targeted anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents in the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatologists , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245274, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030580

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and clinical presentation of SARS-CoV-2 infections in a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) cohort; to assess correlations with disease characteristics and rheumatic therapy; and to evaluate the occurrence of treatment discontinuation and its impact on disease activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SLE patients monitored by a single Italian centre were interviewed between February and July 2020. Patients were considered to be positive for SARS-CoV-2 infections in case of 1) positive nasopharyngeal swab; 2) positive serology associated with COVID19 suggesting symptoms. The following data were also recorded: clinical symptoms, adoption of social distancing measures, disease activity and treatment discontinuation. RESULTS: 332 patients were enrolled in the study. Six patients (1.8%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection, with the incidence being significantly higher in the subgroup of patients treated with biological Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (p = 0.005), while no difference was observed for other therapies, age at enrollment, disease duration, type of cumulative organ involvement or adoption of social isolation. The course of the disease was mild. Thirty-six patients (11.1%) discontinued at least part of their therapy during this time period, and 27 (8.1%) cases of disease flare were recorded. Correlation between flare and discontinuation of therapy was statistically significant (p<0.001). No significant increase of rate of flare in a subgroup of the same patients during 2020 was observed. CONCLUSION: Treatment discontinuation seems to be an important cause of disease flare. Our findings suggest that abrupt drug withdrawal should be avoided or evaluated with caution on the basis of individual infection risk and comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(22)2020 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945812

ABSTRACT

The unexpected outbreak of the COVID-19 disease had significant and enormous repercussions on the healthcare systems, such as the need to reorganise healthcare organisations in order to concentrate resources needed to the care of COVID-19 patients and to respond in general to this health emergency. Due to these challenges, the care of several chronic conditions was in many cases discontinued and patients and healthcare professionals treating these conditions had to cope with this new scenario. This was the case of the world rare diseases (RDs) that had to face this global emergency despite the vulnerability of people with RDs and the well-known need for high expertise required to treat and manage them. The numerous lessons learned so far regarding health emergencies and RDs should represent the basis for the establishment of new healthcare policies and plans aimed at ensuring the preparedness of our health systems in providing appropriate care to people living with RDs in the case of eventual new emergencies. This paper aims at providing pragmatic considerations that might be useful in designing future actions to create or optimise existing organisational models for the care of RDs in case of future emergencies or any other situation that might threaten the provision of routine care. These policies and plans should benefit from the multi-stakeholder RDs networks (such as the European Reference Networks), that should join forces at European, national, and local levels to minimise the economic, organisational, and health-related impact and the negative effects of potential emergencies on the RDs community. In order to design and develop these policies and plans, a decalogue of points to consider were developed to ensure appropriate care for people living with RDs in the case of eventual future health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Emergencies , Rare Diseases/therapy , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Rare Diseases/epidemiology
13.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(9): e518-e519, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641264
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