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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319519

ABSTRACT

Multiorgan injuries are a major complication of severe COVID-19;however, its pathogenesis is barely understood. Herein, we profiled the host responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection by performing quantitative proteomics of COVID-19 postmortem samples, and provided a comprehensive proteome map covering the protein alterations in eight different organs/tissues. Our results revealed that lung underwent the most abundant protein alterations mainly enriched in immune-/inflammation-related or morphology-related processes, while surprisingly, other organs/tissues exhibited significant protein alterations mainly enriched in processes related with organ movement, respiration, and metabolism. These results indicate that the major cause of lung injury was excessive inflammatory response, and subsequent intravascular thrombosis and pulmonary architecture/function destruction, while other organs/tissues were mainly injured by hypoxia and functional impairment. Therefore, our findings demonstrate the significant pathophysiological alternations of host proteins/pathways associated with multiorgan injuries of COVID-19, which provides invaluable knowledge about COVID-19-associated host responses and sheds light on the pathogenesis of COVID-19.

2.
Chin Chem Lett ; 32(10): 3019-3022, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520747

ABSTRACT

The wide-spreading SARS-CoV-2 virus has put the world into boiling water for more than a year, however pharmacological therapies to act effectively against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain elusive. Chloroquine (CQ), an antimalarial drug, was found to exhibit promising antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo at a high dosage, thus CQ was approved by the FDA for the emergency use authorization (EUA) in the fight against COVID-19 in the US, but later was revoked the EUA status due to the severe clinical toxicity. Herein, we show that supramolecular formulation of CQ by a macrocyclic host, curcurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), reduced its non-specific toxicity and improved its antiviral activity against coronavirus, working in synergy with CB[7]. CB[7] was found to form 1:1 host-guest complexes with CQ, with a binding constant of ∼104 L/mol. The CQ-CB[7] formulation decreased the cytotoxicity of CQ against Vero E6 and L-02 cell lines. In particular, the cytotoxicity of CQ (60 µmol/L) against both Vero E6 cell line and L-02 cell lines was completely inhibited in the presence of 300 µmol/L and 600 µmol/L CB[7], respectively. Furthermore, the CB[7] alone showed astonishing antiviral activity in SARS-CoV-2 infected Vero E6 cells and mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59) infected N2A cells, and synergistically improved the antiviral activity of CQ-CB[7], suggesting that CB[7]-based CQ formulation has a great potential as a safe and effective antiviral agent against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronavirus.

4.
Natl Sci Rev ; 7(7): 1157-1168, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114858

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global public health crisis. The symptoms of COVID-19 range from mild to severe, but the physiological changes associated with COVID-19 are barely understood. In this study, we performed targeted metabolomic and lipidomic analyses of plasma from a cohort of patients with COVID-19 who had experienced different symptoms. We found that metabolite and lipid alterations exhibit apparent correlation with the course of disease in these patients, indicating that the development of COVID-19 affected their whole-body metabolism. In particular, malic acid of the TCA cycle and carbamoyl phosphate of the urea cycle result in altered energy metabolism and hepatic dysfunction, respectively. It should be noted that carbamoyl phosphate is profoundly down-regulated in patients who died compared with patients with mild symptoms. And, more importantly, guanosine monophosphate (GMP), which is mediated not only by GMP synthase but also by CD39 and CD73, is significantly changed between healthy subjects and patients with COVID-19, as well as between the mild and fatal cases. In addition, dyslipidemia was observed in patients with COVID-19. Overall, the disturbed metabolic patterns have been found to align with the progress and severity of COVID-19. This work provides valuable knowledge about plasma biomarkers associated with COVID-19 and potential therapeutic targets, as well as an important resource for further studies of the pathogenesis of COVID-19.

5.
Cell Rep ; 34(7): 108761, 2021 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062276

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a current global health threat caused by the novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Emerging evidence indicates that SARS-CoV-2 elicits a dysregulated immune response and a delayed interferon (IFN) expression in patients, which contribute largely to the viral pathogenesis and development of COVID-19. However, underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the activation and repression of the innate immune response by SARS-CoV-2. We show that SARS-CoV-2 RNA activates the RIG-I-MAVS-dependent IFN signaling pathway. We further uncover that ORF9b immediately accumulates and antagonizes the antiviral type I IFN response during SARS-CoV-2 infection on primary human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells. ORF9b targets the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) essential modulator NEMO and interrupts its K63-linked polyubiquitination upon viral stimulation, thereby inhibiting the canonical IκB kinase alpha (IKKα)/ß/γ-NF-κB signaling and subsequent IFN production. Our findings thus unveil the innate immunosuppression by ORF9b and provide insights into the host-virus interplay during the early stage of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , I-kappa B Kinase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Retinoic Acid/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Ubiquitination
6.
Virol Sin ; 35(3): 321-329, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959357

ABSTRACT

The ongoing outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global public health emergency. SARS-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative pathogen of COVID-19, is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Coronaviridae. For RNA viruses, virus-encoded RNA helicases have long been recognized to play pivotal roles during viral life cycles by facilitating the correct folding and replication of viral RNAs. Here, our studies show that SARS-CoV-2-encoded nonstructural protein 13 (nsp13) possesses the nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase (NTPase) and RNA helicase activities that can hydrolyze all types of NTPs and unwind RNA helices dependently of the presence of NTP, and further characterize the biochemical characteristics of these two enzymatic activities associated with SARS-CoV-2 nsp13. Moreover, we found that some bismuth salts could effectively inhibit both the NTPase and RNA helicase activities of SARS-CoV-2 nsp13 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our findings demonstrate the NTPase and helicase activities of SARS-CoV-2 nsp13, which may play an important role in SARS-CoV-2 replication and serve as a target for antivirals.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Bismuth/pharmacology , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Nucleoside-Triphosphatase/drug effects , RNA Helicases/drug effects , Salts/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphatases/drug effects , Adenosine Triphosphatases/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Methyltransferases/genetics , Nucleoside-Triphosphatase/genetics , Nucleoside-Triphosphatase/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Helicases/genetics , RNA Helicases/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication
7.
Immunity ; 53(5): 1108-1122.e5, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-880509

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a global public health crisis. However, little is known about the pathogenesis and biomarkers of COVID-19. Here, we profiled host responses to COVID-19 by performing plasma proteomics of a cohort of COVID-19 patients, including non-survivors and survivors recovered from mild or severe symptoms, and uncovered numerous COVID-19-associated alterations of plasma proteins. We developed a machine-learning-based pipeline to identify 11 proteins as biomarkers and a set of biomarker combinations, which were validated by an independent cohort and accurately distinguished and predicted COVID-19 outcomes. Some of the biomarkers were further validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a larger cohort. These markedly altered proteins, including the biomarkers, mediate pathophysiological pathways, such as immune or inflammatory responses, platelet degranulation and coagulation, and metabolism, that likely contribute to the pathogenesis. Our findings provide valuable knowledge about COVID-19 biomarkers and shed light on the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Plasma/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/classification , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Female , Humans , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Proteomics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
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