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1.
JAMA Pediatrics ; 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-689241

ABSTRACT

Children are susceptible to infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) but generally present with mild symptoms compared with adults Children drive spread of respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses in the population, but data on children as sources of SARS-CoV-2 spread are sparse Early reports did not find strong evidence of children as major contributors to SARS-CoV-2 spread, but school closures early in pandemic responses thwarted larger-scale investigations of schools as a source of community transmission As public health systems look to reopen schools and day cares, understanding transmission potential in children will be important to guide public health measures Here, we report that replication of SARS-CoV-2 in older children leads to similar levels of viral nucleic acid as adults, but significantly greater amounts of viral nucleic acid are detected in children younger than 5 years

2.
J Pediatr ; 2020 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611398

ABSTRACT

This is a single-center US case series of 18 infants <90 days old who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. These infants had a mild febrile illness without significant pulmonary disease. One half were hospitalized; one had bacterial urinary tract co-infection. Nasopharyngeal viral loads were notably high. Latinx ethnicity was overrepresented.

3.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; : e28504, 2020 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611154
4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2020 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are many pharmacologic therapies that are being used or considered for treatment of COVID-19. There is a need for frequently updated practice guidelines on their use, based on critical evaluation of rapidly emerging literature. OBJECTIVE: Develop evidence-based rapid guidelines intended to support patients, clinicians and other health-care professionals in their decisions about treatment and management of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: IDSA formed a multidisciplinary guideline panel of infectious disease clinicians, pharmacists, and methodologists with varied areas of expertise. Process followed a rapid recommendation checklist. The panel prioritized questions and outcomes. Then a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the certainty of evidence and make recommendations. RESULTS: The IDSA guideline panel agreed on 7 treatment recommendations and provided narrative summaries of other treatments undergoing evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: The panel expressed the overarching goal that patients be recruited into ongoing trials, which would provide much needed evidence on the efficacy and safety of various therapies for COVID-19, given that we could not make a determination whether the benefits outweigh harms for most treatments.

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