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1.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-333335

ABSTRACT

The Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 exhibits reduced susceptibility to vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies, requiring a boost to generate protective immunity. Little is known about the durability of vaccine-boosted omicron neutralizing antibodies and the potential impact of boosting with heterologous vaccine modalities. We assessed the magnitude and short-term durability of neutralizing antibodies after homologous and heterologous boosting with mRNA and Ad26.COV2.S vaccines. Using pseudovirus and live virus neutralization assays, all prime-boost combinations substantially increased the neutralization titers to Omicron although the boosted titers declined rapidly within 2 months from the peak response compared to boosted titers against the prototypic D614G variant. Boosted Omicron neutralization titers were substantially higher for homologous mRNA vaccine boosting, and for heterologous mRNA and Ad26.COV2.S vaccine boosting, compared to homologous Ad26.COV2.S boosting. Homologous mRNA vaccine boosting generated nearly equivalent neutralizing activity against Omicron subvariants BA.1, BA.2 and BA.3. These results have implications for boosting requirements to protect against Omicron and future variants of SARS-CoV-2.

3.
Frontiers in immunology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1762664

ABSTRACT

The increasing prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 variants has raised concerns regarding possible decreases in vaccine effectiveness. Here, neutralizing antibody titers elicited by mRNA-based and adenoviral vector-based vaccines against variant pseudotyped viruses were measured. BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273-elicited antibodies showed modest neutralization resistance against Beta, Delta, Delta plus and Lambda variants whereas Ad26.COV2.S-elicited antibodies from a significant fraction of vaccinated individuals had less neutralizing titer (IC50 <50). The data underscore the importance of surveillance for breakthrough infections that result in severe COVID-19 and suggest a potential benefit by second immunization following Ad26.COV2.S to increase protection from current and future variants.

4.
The New Advanced Society ; n/a(n/a):289-305, 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1750286

ABSTRACT

Summary Pandemic of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) has put tremendous pressure on the people of different localities, states and countries. In a short span of time, it spread all over the world. This has affected the social life of people by enforcing them to stay at home and keep social distance. Many developed countries were also not able to handle the situation even though all resources were available with them. This chapter discussed about the symptoms of COVID-19, precautionary measures, ways of spreading the Coronavirus, and technologies used to fight COVID-19. This also discussed about the impact of COVID-19 on business, financial market, supply side, demand side and international trade on Indian economy. Objective To determine the impact of MS disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) on the development of cellular and humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods MS patients aged 18-60 were evaluated for anti-nucleocapsid and anti-Spike RBD antibody with electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay;antibody responses to Spike protein, RBD, N-terminal domain with multiepitope bead-based immunoassays (MBI);live virus immunofluorescence-based microneutralization assay;T-cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 Spike using TruCulture ELISA;and IL-2 and IFN? ELISpot assays. Assay results were compared by DMT class. Spearman correlation and multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations between immunologic responses and infection severity. Results Between 1/6/2021 and 7/21/2021, 389 MS patients were recruited (mean age 40.3?years;74% female;62% non-White). Most common DMTs were ocrelizumab (OCR) - 40%;natalizumab - 17%, Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P) modulators -12%;and 15% untreated. 177 patients (46%) had laboratory evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection;130 had symptomatic infection, 47 - asymptomatic. Antibody responses were markedly attenuated in OCR compared to other groups (p≤0.0001). T-cell responses (IFN?) were decreased in S1P (p=0.03), increased in natalizumab (p<0.001), and similar in other DMTs, including OCR. Cellular and humoral responses were moderately correlated in both OCR (r=0.45, p=0.0002) and non-OCR (r=0.64, p<0.0001). Immune responses did not differ by race/ethnicity. COVID-19 clinical course was mostly non-severe and similar across DMTs;7% (9/130) were hospitalized. Interpretation DMTs had differential effects on humoral and cellular immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Immune responses did not correlate with COVID-19 clinical severity in this relatively young and non-disabled group of MS patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

5.
Ann Neurol ; 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739116

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) on the development of cellular and humoral immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: Patients with MS aged 18 to 60 years were evaluated for anti-nucleocapsid and anti-Spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) antibody with electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay; antibody responses to Spike protein, RBD, N-terminal domain with multiepitope bead-based immunoassays (MBI); live virus immunofluorescence-based microneutralization assay; T-cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 Spike using TruCulture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and IL-2 and IFNγ ELISpot assays. Assay results were compared by DMT class. Spearman correlation and multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations between immunologic responses and infection severity. RESULTS: Between January 6, 2021, and July 21, 2021, 389 patients with MS were recruited (mean age 40.3 years; 74% women; 62% non-White). Most common DMTs were ocrelizumab (OCR)-40%; natalizumab -17%, Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P) modulators -12%; and 15% untreated. One hundred seventy-seven patients (46%) had laboratory evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection; 130 had symptomatic infection, and 47 were asymptomatic. Antibody responses were markedly attenuated in OCR compared with other groups (p ≤0.0001). T-cell responses (IFNγ) were decreased in S1P (p = 0.03), increased in natalizumab (p <0.001), and similar in other DMTs, including OCR. Cellular and humoral responses were moderately correlated in both OCR (r = 0.45, p = 0.0002) and non-OCR (r = 0.64, p <0.0001). Immune responses did not differ by race/ethnicity. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical course was mostly non-severe and similar across DMTs; 7% (9/130) were hospitalized. INTERPRETATION: DMTs had differential effects on humoral and cellular immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Immune responses did not correlate with COVID-19 clinical severity in this relatively young and nondisabled group of patients with MS. ANN NEUROL 2022.

6.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(631): eabi8961, 2022 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685481

ABSTRACT

The use of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines will play the major role in helping to end the pandemic that has killed millions worldwide. COVID-19 vaccines have resulted in robust humoral responses and protective efficacy in human trials, but efficacy trials excluded individuals with a prior diagnosis of COVID-19. As a result, little is known about how immune responses induced by mRNA vaccines differ in individuals who recovered from COVID-19. Here, we evaluated longitudinal immune responses to two-dose BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination in 15 adults who had experienced COVID-19, compared to 21 adults who did not have prior COVID-19. Consistent with prior studies of mRNA vaccines, we observed robust cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in both cohorts after the second dose. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2­naive individuals had progressive increases in humoral and antigen-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses after each dose of vaccine, whereas SARS-CoV-2­experienced individuals demonstrated strong humoral and antigen-specific ASC responses to the first dose but these responses were not further enhanced after the second dose of the vaccine at the time points studied. Together, these data highlight the relevance of immunological history for understanding vaccine immune responses and may have implications for personalizing mRNA vaccination regimens used to prevent COVID-19, including for the deployment of booster shots.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic
8.
N Engl J Med ; 386(11): 1046-1057, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655751

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the three vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) that have received emergency use authorization in the United States are highly effective, breakthrough infections are occurring. Data are needed on the serial use of homologous boosters (same as the primary vaccine) and heterologous boosters (different from the primary vaccine) in fully vaccinated recipients. METHODS: In this phase 1-2, open-label clinical trial conducted at 10 sites in the United States, adults who had completed a Covid-19 vaccine regimen at least 12 weeks earlier and had no reported history of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection received a booster injection with one of three vaccines: mRNA-1273 (Moderna) at a dose of 100 µg, Ad26.COV2.S (Johnson & Johnson-Janssen) at a dose of 5×1010 virus particles, or BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) at a dose of 30 µg. The primary end points were safety, reactogenicity, and humoral immunogenicity on trial days 15 and 29. RESULTS: Of the 458 participants who were enrolled in the trial, 154 received mRNA-1273, 150 received Ad26.COV2.S, and 153 received BNT162b2 as booster vaccines; 1 participant did not receive the assigned vaccine. Reactogenicity was similar to that reported for the primary series. More than half the recipients reported having injection-site pain, malaise, headache, or myalgia. For all combinations, antibody neutralizing titers against a SARS-CoV-2 D614G pseudovirus increased by a factor of 4 to 73, and binding titers increased by a factor of 5 to 55. Homologous boosters increased neutralizing antibody titers by a factor of 4 to 20, whereas heterologous boosters increased titers by a factor of 6 to 73. Spike-specific T-cell responses increased in all but the homologous Ad26.COV2.S-boosted subgroup. CD8+ T-cell levels were more durable in the Ad26.COV2.S-primed recipients, and heterologous boosting with the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine substantially increased spike-specific CD8+ T cells in the mRNA vaccine recipients. CONCLUSIONS: Homologous and heterologous booster vaccines had an acceptable safety profile and were immunogenic in adults who had completed a primary Covid-19 vaccine regimen at least 12 weeks earlier. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; DMID 21-0012 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04889209.).


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Injections, Intramuscular/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
9.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(2): 284-294, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate seroreactivity and disease flares after COVID-19 vaccination in a multiethnic/multiracial cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Ninety SLE patients and 20 healthy controls receiving a complete COVID-19 vaccine regimen were included. IgG seroreactivity to the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) and SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization were used to evaluate B cell responses; interferon-γ (IFNγ) production was measured by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay in order to assess T cell responses. Disease activity was measured by the hybrid SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), and flares were identified according to the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-SLEDAI flare index. RESULTS: Overall, fully vaccinated SLE patients produced significantly lower IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD compared to fully vaccinated controls. Twenty-six SLE patients (28.8%) generated an IgG response below that of the lowest control (<100 units/ml). In logistic regression analyses, the use of any immunosuppressant or prednisone and a normal anti-double-stranded DNA antibody level prior to vaccination were associated with decreased vaccine responses. IgG seroreactivity to the SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD strongly correlated with the SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization titers and correlated with antigen-specific IFNγ production determined by ELISpot. In a subset of patients with poor antibody responses, IFNγ production was similarly diminished. Pre- and postvaccination SLEDAI scores were similar in both groups. Postvaccination flares occurred in 11.4% of patients; 1.3% of these were severe. CONCLUSION: In a multiethnic/multiracial study of SLE patients, 29% had a low response to the COVID-19 vaccine which was associated with receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Reassuringly, severe disease flares were rare. While minimal protective levels remain unknown, these data suggest that protocol development is needed to assess the efficacy of booster vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , /therapeutic use , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Prednisone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Symptom Flare Up
10.
Cell Rep ; 38(2): 110237, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588138

ABSTRACT

Recently identified severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants Mu and C.1.2 have spike proteins with mutations that may confer resistance to natural and vaccine-elicited antibodies. Analysis of neutralizing antibody titers in the sera of vaccinated individuals without previous history of infection and from convalescent individuals show partial resistance of the viruses. In contrast, sera from individuals with a previous history of SARS-CoV-2 infection who were subsequently vaccinated neutralize variants with titers 4- to 11-fold higher, providing a rationale for vaccination of individuals with previous infection. The heavily mutated C.1.2 spike is the most antibody neutralization-resistant spike to date; however, the avidity of C.1.2 spike protein for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is low. This finding suggests that the virus evolved to escape the humoral response but has a decrease in fitness, suggesting that it may cause milder disease or be less transmissible. It may be difficult for the spike protein to evolve to escape neutralizing antibodies while maintaining high affinity for ACE2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , A549 Cells , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Neutralization Tests/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods
11.
iScience ; 24(11): 103341, 2021 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474648

ABSTRACT

Highly transmissible SARS-CoV-2 variants identified in India and designated B.1.617, Kappa (B.1.617.1), Delta (B.1.617.2), B.1.618, and B.1.36.29 contain spike mutations L452R, T478K, E484K, E484Q, and N440K located within the spike receptor-binding domain and thus could contribute to increased transmissibility and potentially allow re-infection or cause resistance to vaccine-elicited antibody. To address these issues, we used lentiviruses pseudotyped by variant spikes to measure their neutralization by convalescent sera, vaccine-elicited and Regeneron therapeutic antibodies, and ACE2 affinity. Convalescent sera and vaccine-elicited antibodies neutralized viruses with Delta spike with 2- to 5-fold decrease in titer in different donors. Regeneron antibody cocktail neutralized virus with the Delta spike with a 2.6-fold decrease in titer. Neutralization resistance to serum antibodies and monoclonal antibodies was mediated by L452R mutation. These relatively modest decreases in antibody neutralization titer for viruses with variant spike proteins suggest that current vaccines will remain protective against the family of Delta variants.

12.
N Engl J Med ; 385(25): 2348-2360, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The safety and efficacy of the AZD1222 (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19) vaccine in a large, diverse population at increased risk for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the United States, Chile, and Peru has not been known. METHODS: In this ongoing, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 clinical trial, we investigated the safety, vaccine efficacy, and immunogenicity of two doses of AZD1222 as compared with placebo in preventing the onset of symptomatic and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) 15 days or more after the second dose in adults, including older adults, in the United States, Chile, and Peru. RESULTS: A total of 32,451 participants underwent randomization, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive AZD1222 (21,635 participants) or placebo (10,816 participants). AZD1222 was safe, with low incidences of serious and medically attended adverse events and adverse events of special interest; the incidences were similar to those observed in the placebo group. Solicited local and systemic reactions were generally mild or moderate in both groups. Overall estimated vaccine efficacy was 74.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65.3 to 80.5; P<0.001) and estimated vaccine efficacy was 83.5% (95% CI, 54.2 to 94.1) in participants 65 years of age or older. High vaccine efficacy was consistent across a range of demographic subgroups. In the fully vaccinated analysis subgroup, no severe or critical symptomatic Covid-19 cases were observed among the 17,662 participants in the AZD1222 group; 8 cases were noted among the 8550 participants in the placebo group (<0.1%). The estimated vaccine efficacy for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection (nucleocapsid antibody seroconversion) was 64.3% (95% CI, 56.1 to 71.0; P<0.001). SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binding and neutralizing antibodies increased after the first dose and increased further when measured 28 days after the second dose. CONCLUSIONS: AZD1222 was safe and efficacious in preventing symptomatic and severe Covid-19 across diverse populations that included older adults. (Funded by AstraZeneca and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04516746.).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chile/epidemiology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Middle Aged , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
Clin Pharmacol Ther ; 110(6): 1467-1477, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372711

ABSTRACT

Therapeutics for patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are urgently needed during the pandemic. Bamlanivimab is a potent neutralizing monoclonal antibody that blocks severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) attachment and entry into human cells, which could potentially lead to therapeutic benefit. J2W-MC-PYAA was a randomized, double-blind, sponsor unblinded, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose first-in-human trial (NCT04411628) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. A total of 24 patients received either placebo or a single dose of bamlanivimab (700 mg, 2,800 mg, or 7,000 mg). The primary objective was assessment of safety and tolerability, including adverse events and serious adverse events, with secondary objectives of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic analyses. Treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) rates were identical in the placebo and pooled bamlanivimab groups (66.7%). There were no apparent dose-related increases in the number or severity of TEAEs. There were no serious adverse events or deaths during the study, and no discontinuations due to adverse events. PKs of bamlanivimab is linear and exposure increased proportionally with dose following single i.v. administration. The half-life was ~ 17 days. These results demonstrate the favorable safety profile of bamlanivimab, and provided the initial critical evaluation of safety, tolerability, and PKs in support of the development of bamlanivimab in several ongoing clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Fatigue/chemically induced , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
14.
mBio ; 12(4): e0138621, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327615

ABSTRACT

DNA sequence analysis recently identified the novel SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.526 that is spreading at an alarming rate in the New York City area. Two versions of the variant were identified, both with the prevalent D614G mutation in the spike protein, together with four novel point mutations and with an E484K or S477N mutation in the receptor-binding domain, raising concerns of possible resistance to vaccine-elicited and therapeutic antibodies. We report that convalescent-phase sera and vaccine-elicited antibodies retain full neutralizing titer against the S477N B.1.526 variant and neutralize the E484K version with a modest 3.5-fold decrease in titer compared to D614G. The E484K version was neutralized with a 12-fold decrease in titer by the REGN10933 monoclonal antibody, but the combination cocktail with REGN10987 was fully active. The findings suggest that current vaccines and Regeneron therapeutic monoclonal antibodies will remain protective against the B.1.526 variants. The findings further support the value of widespread vaccination. IMPORTANCE A novel SARS-CoV-2 variant termed B.1.526 was recently identified in New York City and has been found to be spreading at an alarming rate. The variant has mutations in its spike protein that might allow it to escape neutralization by vaccine-elicited antibodies and might cause monoclonal antibody therapy for COVID-19 to be less successful. We report here that these fears are not substantiated; convalescent-phase sera and vaccine-elicited antibodies neutralized the B.1.526 variant. One of the Regeneron therapeutic monoclonal antibodies was less effective against the B.1.526 (E484K) variant but the two-antibody combination cocktail was fully active. The findings should assuage concerns that current vaccines will be ineffective against the B.1.526 (E484K) variant and suggest the importance of continued widespread vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Humans , New York City , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
15.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(593)2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255516

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) poses a public health threat for which preventive and therapeutic agents are urgently needed. Neutralizing antibodies are a key class of therapeutics that may bridge widespread vaccination campaigns and offer a treatment solution in populations less responsive to vaccination. Here, we report that high-throughput microfluidic screening of antigen-specific B cells led to the identification of LY-CoV555 (also known as bamlanivimab), a potent anti-spike neutralizing antibody from a hospitalized, convalescent patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Biochemical, structural, and functional characterization of LY-CoV555 revealed high-affinity binding to the receptor-binding domain, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 binding inhibition, and potent neutralizing activity. A pharmacokinetic study of LY-CoV555 conducted in cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated a mean half-life of 13 days and a clearance of 0.22 ml hour-1 kg-1, consistent with a typical human therapeutic antibody. In a rhesus macaque challenge model, prophylactic doses as low as 2.5 mg/kg reduced viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract in samples collected through study day 6 after viral inoculation. This antibody has entered clinical testing and is being evaluated across a spectrum of COVID-19 indications, including prevention and treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
JAMA ; 326(1): 46-55, 2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251867

ABSTRACT

Importance: Preventive interventions are needed to protect residents and staff of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities from COVID-19 during outbreaks in their facilities. Bamlanivimab, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against SARS-CoV-2, may confer rapid protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. Objective: To determine the effect of bamlanivimab on the incidence of COVID-19 among residents and staff of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities. Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized, double-blind, single-dose, phase 3 trial that enrolled residents and staff of 74 skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in the United States with at least 1 confirmed SARS-CoV-2 index case. A total of 1175 participants enrolled in the study from August 2 to November 20, 2020. Database lock was triggered on January 13, 2021, when all participants reached study day 57. Interventions: Participants were randomized to receive a single intravenous infusion of bamlanivimab, 4200 mg (n = 588), or placebo (n = 587). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was incidence of COVID-19, defined as the detection of SARS-CoV-2 by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and mild or worse disease severity within 21 days of detection, within 8 weeks of randomization. Key secondary outcomes included incidence of moderate or worse COVID-19 severity and incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Results: The prevention population comprised a total of 966 participants (666 staff and 300 residents) who were negative at baseline for SARS-CoV-2 infection and serology (mean age, 53.0 [range, 18-104] years; 722 [74.7%] women). Bamlanivimab significantly reduced the incidence of COVID-19 in the prevention population compared with placebo (8.5% vs 15.2%; odds ratio, 0.43 [95% CI, 0.28-0.68]; P < .001; absolute risk difference, -6.6 [95% CI, -10.7 to -2.6] percentage points). Five deaths attributed to COVID-19 were reported by day 57; all occurred in the placebo group. Among 1175 participants who received study product (safety population), the rate of participants with adverse events was 20.1% in the bamlanivimab group and 18.9% in the placebo group. The most common adverse events were urinary tract infection (reported by 12 participants [2%] who received bamlanivimab and 14 [2.4%] who received placebo) and hypertension (reported by 7 participants [1.2%] who received bamlanivimab and 10 [1.7%] who received placebo). Conclusions and Relevance: Among residents and staff in skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, treatment during August-November 2020 with bamlanivimab monotherapy reduced the incidence of COVID-19 infection. Further research is needed to assess preventive efficacy with current patterns of viral strains with combination monoclonal antibody therapy. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04497987.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Assisted Living Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Double-Blind Method , Drug Approval , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Incidence , Infusions, Intravenous , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Young Adult
17.
mBio ; 12(3): e0069621, 2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249476

ABSTRACT

The increasing prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants with spike protein mutations raises concerns that antibodies elicited by natural infection or vaccination and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies will become less effective. We show that convalescent-phase sera neutralize pseudotyped viruses with the B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.1.248, COH.20G/677H, 20A.EU2, and mink cluster 5 spike proteins with only a minor loss in titer. Similarly, antibodies elicited by Pfizer BNT162b2 vaccination neutralized B.1.351 and B.1.1.248 with only a 3-fold decrease in titer, an effect attributable to E484K. Analysis of the Regeneron monoclonal antibodies REGN10933 and REGN10987 showed that REGN10933 has lost neutralizing activity against the B.1.351 and B.1.1.248 pseudotyped viruses, and the cocktail is 9- to 15-fold decreased in titer. These findings suggest that antibodies elicited by natural infection and by the Pfizer vaccine will maintain protection against the B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and B.1.1.248 variants but that monoclonal antibody therapy may be less effective for patients infected with B.1.351 or B.1.1.248 SARS-CoV-2. IMPORTANCE The rapid evolution of SARS-CoV-2 variants has raised concerns with regard to their potential to escape from vaccine-elicited antibodies and anti-spike protein monoclonal antibodies. We report here on an analysis of sera from recovered patients and vaccinated individuals and on neutralization by Regeneron therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Overall, the variants were neutralized nearly as well as the wild-type pseudotyped virus. The B.1.351 variant was somewhat resistant to vaccine-elicited antibodies but was still readily neutralized. One of the two Regeneron therapeutic monoclonal antibodies seems to have lost most of its activity against the B.1.351 variant, raising concerns that the combination therapy might be less effective for some patients. The findings should alleviate concerns that vaccines will become ineffective but suggest the importance of continued surveillance for potential new variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(10): 1339-1344, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243691

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the humoral and cellular immune response to messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccines in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) on immunomodulatory treatment. METHODS: Established patients at New York University Langone Health with IMID (n=51) receiving the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination were assessed at baseline and after second immunisation. Healthy subjects served as controls (n=26). IgG antibody responses to the spike protein were analysed for humoral response. Cellular immune response to SARS-CoV-2 was further analysed using high-parameter spectral flow cytometry. A second independent, validation cohort of controls (n=182) and patients with IMID (n=31) from Erlangen, Germany, were also analysed for humoral immune response. RESULTS: Although healthy subjects (n=208) and patients with IMID on biologic treatments (mostly on tumour necrosis factor blockers, n=37) demonstrate robust antibody responses (over 90%), those patients with IMID on background methotrexate (n=45) achieve an adequate response in only 62.2% of cases. Similarly, patients with IMID on methotrexate do not demonstrate an increase in CD8+ T-cell activation after vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: In two independent cohorts of patients with IMID, methotrexate, a widely used immunomodulator for the treatment of several IMIDs, adversely affected humoral and cellular immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Although precise cut-offs for immunogenicity that correlate with vaccine efficacy are yet to be established, our findings suggest that different strategies may need to be explored in patients with IMID taking methotrexate to increase the chances of immunisation efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 as has been demonstrated for augmenting immunogenicity to other viral vaccines.

19.
J Community Health ; 46(6): 1161-1169, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230268

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the difficulty of the US public health system to respond effectively to vulnerable subpopulations, causing disproportionate rates of morbidity and mortality. New York Haredi-Orthodox Jewish communities represent a group that have been heavily impacted by Covid-19. Little research has examined their experience or perceptions toward Covid-19 and vaccines. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to explore the experience of Covid-19 among Haredim. Paper surveys were self-administered between December 2020 and January 2021 in Haredi neighborhood pediatricians' offices in Brooklyn, New York. Of 102 respondents, 43% reported either a positive SARS-CoV-2 viral or antibody test. Participants trusted their physicians, Orthodox medical organizations, and rabbinic leaders for medical information. Knowledge of Covid-19 transmission and risk was good (69% answered ≥ 4/6 questions correctly). Only 12% of respondents would accept a Covid-19 vaccine, 41% were undecided and 47% were strongly hesitant. Independent predictors of strong vaccine hesitancy included believing natural infection to be better than vaccination for developing immunity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-14.86), agreement that prior infection provides a path toward resuming communal life (aOR 4.10; 95% CI 1.22-13.77), and pandemic-related loss of trust in physicians (aOR 5.01; 95% CI 1.05-23.96). The primary disseminators of health information for self-protective religious communities should be stakeholders who understand these groups' unique health needs. In communities with significant Covid-19 experience, vaccination messaging may need to be tailored toward protecting infection-naïve individuals and boosting natural immunity against emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Jews , New York , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
20.
Acad Pathol ; 8: 23742895211006818, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225750

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, created an unprecedented need for comprehensive laboratory testing of populations, in order to meet the needs of medical practice and to guide the management and functioning of our society. With the greater New York metropolitan area as an epicenter of this pandemic beginning in March 2020, a consortium of laboratory leaders from the assembled New York academic medical institutions was formed to help identify and solve the challenges of deploying testing. This report brings forward the experience of this consortium, based on the real-world challenges which we encountered in testing patients and in supporting the recovery effort to reestablish the health care workplace. In coordination with the Greater New York Hospital Association and with the public health laboratory of New York State, this consortium communicated with state leadership to help inform public decision-making addressing the crisis. Through the length of the pandemic, the consortium has been a critical mechanism for sharing experience and best practices in dealing with issues including the following: instrument platforms, sample sources, test performance, pre- and post-analytical issues, supply chain, institutional testing capacity, pooled testing, biospecimen science, and research. The consortium also has been a mechanism for staying abreast of state and municipal policies and initiatives, and their impact on institutional and laboratory operations. The experience of this consortium may be of value to current and future laboratory professionals and policy-makers alike, in dealing with major events that impact regional laboratory services.

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