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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329205

ABSTRACT

Introduction The vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 provides humoral immunity to fight COVID-19;however, the acquired immunity gradually declines. Booster vaccination restores reduced humoral immunity;however, its effect on newly emerging variants, such as the Omicron variant, is a concern. As the waves of COVID-19 cases and vaccine programs differ between countries, it is necessary to know the domestic effect of the booster. Methods Serum samples were obtained from healthcare workers (20-69 years old) in the Pfizer BNT162b2 vaccine program at the Toyama University Hospital 6 months after the second dose (6mA2D, n = 648) and 2 weeks after the third dose (2wA3D, n = 565). The anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody level was measured, and neutralization against the wild-type and variants (Delta and Omicron) was evaluated using pseudotyped viruses. Data on booster-related events were collected using questionnaires. Results The median anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody was >30.9-fold elevated after the booster (6mA2D, 710.0 U/mL [interquartile range (IQR): 443.0–1068.0 U/mL];2wA3D, 21927 U/mL [IQR: 15321.0–>25000.0 U/mL]). Median neutralizing activity using 100-fold sera against wild-type-, Delta-, and Omicron-derived variants was elevated from 84.6%, 36.2%, and 31.2% at 6mA2D to >99.9%, 99.1%, and 94.6% at 2wA3D, respectively. The anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels were significantly elevated in individuals with fever ≥37.5 °C, general fatigue, and myalgia, local swelling, and local hardness. Conclusion The booster effect, especially against the Omicron variant, was observed in the Japanese population. These findings contribute to the precise understanding of the efficacy and side effects of the booster and the promotion of vaccine campaigns.

2.
Frontiers in immunology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1710858

ABSTRACT

Background The role of type I interferons (IFNs) in the early phase of COVID-19 remains unclear. Objectives To evaluate the relationship between IFN-I levels in patients with COVID-19 and clinical presentation, SARS-CoV-2 viral load, and other major pro-inflammatory cytokines. Methods This prospective observational study recruited patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-α), interferon-beta (IFN-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL10) within 5 days after symptom onset were measured using an ELISA, in serum from blood collected within 5 days after the onset of symptoms. The SARS-CoV-2 viral load was determined via qPCR using nasal-swab specimens and serum. Results The study enrolled 50 patients with COVID-19. IFN-α levels were significantly higher in patients who presented with pneumonia or developed hypoxemic respiratory failure (p < 0.001). Furthermore, IFN-α levels were associated with viral load in nasal-swab specimens and RNAemia (p < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant association between IFN-β levels and the presence of pneumonia or RNAemia, despite showing a stronger association with nasal-swab viral load (p < 0.001). Correlation analysis showed that the serum levels of IFN-α significantly correlated with those of IFN-β, IL-6, and CXCL10, while the levels of IFN-β did not correlate with those of IL-6 or CXCL10. Conclusions Serum IFN-I levels in the early phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection were higher in patients who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure. The association between IFN-α, IL-6, and CXCL10 may reflect the systemic immune response against SARS-CoV-2 invasion into pulmonary circulation, which might be an early predictor of respiratory failure due to COVID-19.

3.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0056121, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546468

ABSTRACT

Vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 have been introduced. To investigate the relationship between vaccine-induced humoral immunity and patient age, we measured antibody levels and neutralization in vaccinated sera. Sera from 13 to 17 days after the second dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine were collected from health care workers at the University of Toyama (n = 740). Antibody levels were measured by the anti-receptor binding domain antibody test (anti-RBD test), and neutralization against wild-type (WT), α- and ß-variant pseudotyped viruses were assayed using a high-throughput chemiluminescent reduction neutralizing test (htCRNT; positivity cutoff, 50% neutralization at serum dilution 1:100). Basic clinical characteristics were obtained from questionnaires. Antibodies were confirmed in all participants in both the anti-RBD test (median, 2,112 U/ml; interquartile range [IQR], 1,275 to 3,390 U/ml) and the htCRNT against WT (median % inhibition, >99.9; IQR, >99.9 to >99.9). For randomly selected sera (n = 61), 100.0% had positive htCRNT values against the α- and ß-derived variants. Among those who answered the questionnaire (n = 237), the values of the anti-RBD test were negatively correlated with age in females (P < 0.01). An age-dependent decline in neutralization was observed against the variants but not against the wild-type virus (wild type, P = 0.09; α, P < 0.01; ß, P < 0.01). The neutralizing activity induced by BNT162b2 was obtained not only against the wild-type virus, but also against the variants; however, there was an age-dependent decrease in the latter. Age-related heterogeneity of vaccine-acquired immunity is a concern in preventive strategies in the era dominated by variants. IMPORTANCE Since mRNA vaccines utilize wild-type SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as an antigen, there are potential concerns about acquiring immunity to variants of this virus. The neutralizing activity in BNT162b2-vaccinated individuals was higher against the wild-type virus than against its variants; this effect was more apparent in older age groups. This finding suggests that one of the weaknesses of the mRNA vaccine is the high risk of variant infection in the elderly population. Because the elderly are at a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the age-dependent decline of neutralization against viral variants should be considered while planning vaccination programs that include boosters.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/classification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination , Young Adult , /immunology
4.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0056021, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546467

ABSTRACT

Serological tests are beneficial for recognizing the immune response against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). To identify protective immunity, optimization of the chemiluminescent reduction neutralizing test (CRNT) is critical. Whether commercial antibody tests have comparable accuracy is unknown. Serum samples were obtained from COVID-19 patients (n = 74), SARS-CoV-2 PCR-negative (n = 179), and suspected healthy individuals (n = 229) before SARS-CoV-2 variants had been detected locally. The convalescent phase was defined as the period after day 10 from disease onset or the episode of close contact. The CRNT using pseudotyped viruses displaying the wild-type (WT) spike protein and a commercial anti-receptor-binding domain (RBD) antibody test were assayed. Serology for the B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 variants was also assayed. Both tests concurred for symptomatic COVID-19 patients in the convalescent phase. They clearly differentiated between patients and suspected healthy individuals (sensitivity: 95.8% and 100%, respectively; specificity: 99.1% and 100%, respectively). Anti-RBD antibody test results correlated with neutralizing titers (r = 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22-0.38). Compared with the WT, lower CRNT values were observed for the variants. Of the samples with ≥100 U/mL by the anti-RBD antibody test, 77.8% and 88.9% showed ≥50% neutralization against the B.1.1.7 and the B.1.351 variants, respectively. Exceeding 100 U/mL in the anti-RBD antibody test was associated with neutralization of variants (P < 0.01). The CRNT and commercial anti-RBD antibody test effectively classified convalescent COVID-19 patients. Strong positive results with the anti-RBD antibody test can reflect neutralizing activity against emerging variants. IMPORTANCE This study provides a diagnostic evidence of test validity, which can lead to vaccine efficacy and proof of recovery after COVID-19. It is not easy to know neutralization against SARS-CoV-2 in the clinical laboratory because of technical and biohazard issues. The correlation of the quantitative anti-receptor-binding domain antibody test, which is widely available, with neutralizing test indicates that we can know indirectly the state of acquisition of functional immunity against wild and variant-type viruses in the clinical laboratory.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Neutralization Tests/methods , Protein Binding/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/classification , Young Adult
5.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 147-153, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363704

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in serum and its association with the clinical severity of COVID-19. This retrospective cohort study performed at Toyama University Hospital included consecutive patients with confirmed COVID-19. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia and the strength of its association with clinical severity variables were examined. Fifty-six patients were included in this study. RNAemia was detected in 19.6% (11/56) patients on admission, and subsequently in 1.0% (1/25), 50.0% (6/12), and 100.0% (4/4) moderate, severe, and critically ill patients, respectively. Patients with RNAemia required more frequent oxygen supplementation (90.0% vs. 13.3%), ICU admission (81.8% vs. 6.7%), and invasive mechanical ventilation (27.3% vs. 0.0%). Among patients with RNAemia, the median viral loads of nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs that were collected around the same time as the serum sample were significantly higher in critically ill (5.4 log10 copies/µl; interquartile range [IQR]: 4.2-6.3) than in moderate-severe cases (2.6 log10 copies/µl; [IQR: 1.1-4.5]; p = 0.030) and were significantly higher in nonsurvivors (6.2 log10 copies/µl [IQR: 6.0-6.5]) than in survivors (3.9 log10 copies/µl [IQR: 1.6-4.6]; p = 0.045). This study demonstrated a relatively high proportion of SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia and an association between RNAemia and clinical severity. Moreover, among the patients with RNAemia, the viral loads of NP swabs were correlated with disease severity and mortality, suggesting the potential utility of combining serum testing with NP tests as a prognostic indicator for COVID-19, with higher quality than each separate test.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Viremia , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16535, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360210

ABSTRACT

Adaptive immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) dynamics remain largely unknown. The neutralizing antibody (NAb) levels in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are helpful for understanding the pathology. Using SARS-CoV-2 pseudotyped virus, serum sample neutralization values in symptomatic COVID-19 patients were measured using the chemiluminescence reduction neutralization test (CRNT). At least two sequential serum samples collected during hospitalization were analyzed to assess NAbs neutralizing activity dynamics at different time points. Of the 11 patients, four (36.4%), six (54.5%), and one (9.1%) had moderate, severe, and critical disease, respectively. Fifty percent neutralization (N50%-CRNT) was observed upon admission in 90.9% (10/11); all patients acquired neutralizing activity 2-12 days after onset. In patients with moderate disease, neutralization was observed at earliest within two days after symptom onset. In patients with severe-to-critical disease, neutralization activity increased, plateauing 9-16 days after onset. Neutralization activity on admission was significantly higher in patients with moderate disease than in patients with severe-to-critical disease (relative % of infectivity, 6.4% vs. 41.1%; P = .011). Neutralization activity on admission inversely correlated with disease severity. The rapid NAb response may play a crucial role in preventing the progression of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
7.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(7): 1122-1125, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185070

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to assess the nasopharyngeal viral load at discharge or time of discontinued isolation in coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to our hospital and discharged under the current symptom-based criteria in Japan. Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and hospitalized at Toyama University Hospital were included in the analysis. Nasopharyngeal viral load was measured when symptom-based criteria for discharge or end of isolation in the accommodations were met, and examined the relationship between viral load and days after onset or age. From the perspective of virus isolation limit, the amount of infectious viral load was defined at 50 copies/µL by nasopharyngeal sample. Thirty-three patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were included in the analysis, after excluding critical and fatal cases. Mean nasopharyngeal viral load at discharge or end of isolation was 1.90 log-copies/µL, and 64% of patients were discharged with over 50 copies/µL. No correlation was apparent between age and viral load at discharge, and viral load remained relatively high at discharge or end of isolation in all age groups. Although attempts at infectious virus isolation are necessary, infection control precautions even after discharge or discontinued isolation in accommodations may be needed, as the date of onset mostly depended on self-reporting by patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Humans , Japan , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
8.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 33-35, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144720

ABSTRACT

As of October 2020, there is still no specific drug to treat COVID-19 as it rages worldwide. Favipiravir, indicated for the treatment of new and re-emerging influenza infections, has been suggested to be effective against SARS-CoV-2, although this is not yet fully validated. We administered favipiravir to a 64-year-old female patient with COVID-19. Her symptoms resolved quickly after the start of treatment, with reduction of SARS-CoV-2 viral load, but she developed a fever again on day 12. Since the fever was relieved by discontinuation of favipiravir, and based on positive results with a drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test, we diagnosed her with favipiravir-induced drug fever. A decrease in the serum concentration of favipiravir was observed along with resolution of the fever. The present case suggests that drug fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis of relapsing fever episodes in COVID-19 patients receiving favipiravir.


Subject(s)
Amides/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Fever/chemically induced , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Amides/pharmacology , Amides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Viral Load/drug effects
9.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e924476, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717813

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The effect of corticosteroids in the management of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is unclear. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old man who tested positive for COVID-19 by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis was admitted to our hospital. On admission, he had no dyspnea and his oxygen saturation (SpO2) level was normal. Chest imaging revealed ground-glass opacities (GGO) distributed in both lung fields. Four days after admission, bilateral lung shadows worsened, with a slight reduction in SpO2 levels. Short-term corticosteroid therapy was initiated, and SpO2 and radiographic findings promptly improved without use of antiviral agents. CONCLUSIONS More data are required to ascertain the role of corticosteroids in the management of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Drug Administration Schedule , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Oxygen/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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