Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(6)2022 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911281

ABSTRACT

Lockdown implementation during COVID-19 pandemic has caused many negative impacts in various aspect of life, including in the academic world. Routine disruption to teaching and learning environment has raised concerns to the wellbeing of university staff and students. This study aimed to examine the subjective wellbeing of the university community in Northern Malaysia during lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic and the factors affecting it. An online cross-sectional survey involving 1148 university staff and students was conducted between March and April 2020. The research tools include the Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI) to assess subjective wellbeing and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress 21 (DASS-21) scale for psychological distress. While we found the subjective wellbeing score in our study population was stable at 7.67 (1.38), there was high prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress with 27.4%, 18.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. The students reported higher levels of psychological distress compared to staff. The PWI score was seen to be inversely affected by the depression and stress score with a reduction in the PWI score by 0.022 (95% CI -0.037 to -0.007) and 0.046 (95% CI -0.062 to -0.030) with every one-unit increment for each subscale, respectively. Those who perceived to have more difficulty due to the lockdown also reported low subjective wellbeing. Thus, it is crucial to ensure policies and preventative measures are in place to provide conducive teaching and learning environment. Additionally, the detrimental psychological effects especially among students should be addressed proactively.

2.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268926, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the vaccination drive against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Malaysia progresses rapidly, the main challenge will gradually shift from procuring and distributing vaccines to ensuring the broadest possible acceptance among all population segments. Therefore, this study used the integrated framework of the health belief model (HBM) and the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to investigate the predictors of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccines in Malaysia. METHODOLOGY: A market research company in Malaysia was engaged to collect data during June 11-20, 2021 using self-administered questionnaires via its online panel, ensuring a nationwide random sample of 804 respondents. A logistic regression was subsequently estimated to determine the significant predictors of vaccination intention. RESULTS: The predictors that significantly affect COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Malaysia are age, susceptibility, religious beliefs, attitude, subjective norms, and trust in the vaccine. In particular, those who are more inclined to get vaccinated are older individuals, have a higher perceived risk of infection and social pressure to get vaccinated, have a positive attitude, and have high levels of trust in the vaccine. Individuals' who perceive that their religious beliefs are against vaccination are more likely to exhibit uncertainty toward it. CONCLUSION: This study showed that although a large proportion of respondents indicated that they were willing to be vaccinated against COVID-19, there are concerns about religious barriers and trust in the vaccine that the relevant stakeholders should address. Campaigns should also focus on shaping the nation's attitude toward COVID-19 vaccines, in parallel with encouraging people to use their social influence in helping those in their close circle who are unsure of vaccination to cross the line. These measures will prove to be pertinent as the nation begins to administer booster vaccines to tackle the waning effects of COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urinary Bladder Diseases , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Intention , Malaysia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
3.
The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 27(6):1-6, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1695634

ABSTRACT

In pandemic situations, data becomes more critical. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in early November 2019, we have seen a significant increase in the number of dashboards tracking COVID-19 cases. Preferably, data should be available in tabular formats, such as comma-separated values easily downloadable from the data.world website (https://data.world/), GitHub (https://github.com/) or the Ministry of Health Malaysias official COVID-19 resource centre. v) Responsible agencies must vet the data to ensure reliability and validity. The Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation mandated that funding recipients share data from research related to COVID-19 (13). ii) Researchers must provide a list of their COVID-19 research projects and links to access and download the data. iii) Researchers must provide a COVID-19 data dictionary and adequate metadata. iv) Researchers must document the data-wrangling process so that it is reproducible. v) Researchers must indicate to the human ethics committee that their COVID-19 data will be shared and will not be destroyed within a specific time. Specifically, data from COVID-19 surveillance will enable epidemiologists, physicians and health workers to: i) enable rapid detection, isolation, testing and management of cases;ii) monitor trends in COVID-19 deaths;iii) identify, follow up with and quarantine contacts;iv) detect and contain clusters and outbreaks, especially among vulnerable populations;v) guide the implementation and adjustment of targeted control measures while enabling the safe resumption of economic and social activities;vi) evaluate the pandemics impact on healthcare systems and society;vii) monitor longer-term epidemiologic trends and the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2;and virus;and viii) contribute to the understanding of the cocirculation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, influenza and other respiratory viruses and pathogens.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stroke is a chronic disease that requires stroke survivors to be supported long-term by their families. This is especially because of the inaccessibility to post-stroke rehabilitation outside hospitals. The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis and the pandemic restrictions in Malaysia are expected to exponentially increase the demand from family caregivers in supporting stroke survivors. Thus, this study aims to explore the burden, experience, and coping mechanism of the family caregivers supporting stroke survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODOLOGY: A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted from November 2020 to June 2021 in Malaysia. A total of 13 respondents were recruited from two public rehabilitation centers in Kota Bharu, Kelantan. In-depth interviews were conducted with the participants. Comprehensive representation of perspectives from the respondents was achieved through purposive sampling. The interviews were conducted in the Kelantanese dialect, recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three themes on burdens and experiences were identified. They were worsening pre-existing issues, emerging new issues, and fewer burdens and challenges. Two themes on coping strategies were also identified. They were problem-focused engagement and emotion-focused engagement. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the entire system of stroke management. While family caregivers mostly faced the extra burden through different experiences, they also encountered some positive impacts from the pandemic. The integrated healthcare system, especially in the era of digitalization, is an important element to establish the collaborative commitment of multiple stakeholders to compensate burden and sustain the healthcare of stroke survivors during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke Rehabilitation , Adaptation, Psychological , Caregivers , Family , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Malays J Med Sci ; 28(5): 1-9, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513329

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19 disease, which has become pandemic since December 2019. In the recent months, among five countries in the Southeast Asia, Malaysia has the highest per-capita daily new cases and daily new deaths. A mathematical modelling approach using a Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) technique was used to generate data-driven 30-days ahead forecasts for the number of daily cases in the states and federal territories in Malaysia at four consecutive time points between 27 July 2021 and 26 August 2021. Each forecast was produced using SSA prediction model of the current major trend at each time point. The objective is to understand the transition dynamics of COVID-19 in each state by analysing the direction of change of the major trends during the period of study. The states and federal territories in Malaysia were grouped in four categories based on the nature of the transition. Overall, it was found that the COVID-19 spread has progressed unevenly across states and federal territories. Major regions like Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya and Negeri Sembilan were in Group 3 (fast decrease in infectivity) and Labuan was in Group 4 (possible eradication of infectivity). Other states e.g. Pulau Pinang, Sabah, Sarawak, Kelantan and Johor were categorised in Group 1 (very high infectivity levels) with Perak, Kedah, Pahang, Terengganu and Melaka were classified in Group 2 (high infectivity levels). It is also cautioned that SSA provides a promising avenue for forecasting the transition dynamics of COVID-19; however, the reliability of this technique depends on the availability of good quality data.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154379

ABSTRACT

To curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus (COVID-19) in Malaysia, the government imposed a nationwide movement control order (MCO) from 18 March 2020 to 3 May 2020. It was enforced in four phases (i.e., MCO 1, MCO 2, MCO 3 and MCO 4). In this paper, we propose an initiative to assess the impact of MCO by using time-varying reproduction number (Rt). We used data from the Johns Hopkins University Centre for Systems Science and Engineering Coronavirus repository. Day 1 was taken from the first assumed local transmission of COVID-19. We estimated Rt by using the EpiEstim package and plotted the epidemic curve and Rt. Then, we extracted the mean Rt at day 1, day 5 and day 10 for all MCO phases and compared the differences. The Rt values peaked around day 43, which was shortly before the start of MCO 1. The means for Rt at day 1, day 5, and day 10 for all MCOs ranged between 0.665 and 1.147. The average Rt gradually decreased in MCO 1 and MCO 2. Although spikes in the number of confirmed cases were observed when restrictions were gradually relaxed in the later MCO phases, the situation remained under control with Rt values being stabilised to below unity level (Rt value less than one).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Basic Reproduction Number , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Malays J Med Sci ; 27(6): 1-6, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033638

ABSTRACT

The recent spike of transmissibility of COVID-19 was evident by a large number of COVID-19 cases and apparent quick spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the state of Sabah, Selangor and Negeri Sembilan in Malaysia. The question remains as to what are the main contributory factors for the impending COVID-19 second wave in Malaysia and why the current surveillance system fails to show signs of the impending second - or the third - COVID-19 wave. In public health surveillance, data are the ultimate indicator, and in the era of big data and the Industrial Revolution 4.0, data has become a valuable commodity. The COVID-19 data keeper must fulfil some criteria to ensure COVID-19 data are useful. Researchers are obligated to share their COVID-19 data responsibly. The surveillance for COVID-19 is paramount, and the guidelines such as the one published by the World Health Organization 'Public health surveillance for COVID-19: interim guidance' must be referred to. Data must be taken seriously and shared to enable scientists, clinicians, epidemiologists and public health experts fight COVID-19.

8.
Malays J Med Sci ; 27(2): 1-9, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-96129

ABSTRACT

When the first report of COVID-19 appeared in December 2019 from Wuhan, China, the world unknowingly perceived this as another flu-like illness. Many were surprised at the extreme steps that China had subsequently taken to seal Wuhan from the rest of the world. However, by February 2020, the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, had spread so quickly across the globe that the World Health Organization officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic. COVID-19 is not the first pandemic the world has seen, so what makes it so unique in Malaysia, is discussed to avoid a future coronacoma.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL