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1.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 464-474, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429159

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe the development of a protocol and practical tool for the safe delivery of telemental health (TMH) services to the home. The COVID-19 pandemic forced providers to rapidly transition their outpatient practices to home-based TMH (HB-TMH) without existing protocols or tools to guide them. This experience underscored the need for a standardized privacy and safety tool as HB-TMH is expected to continue as a resource during future crises as well as to become a component of the routine mental health care landscape. Methods: The authors represent a subset of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Telemental Health Consortium. They met weekly through videoconferencing to review published safety standards of care, existing TMH guidelines for clinic-based and home-based services, and their own institutional protocols. They agreed on three domains foundational to the delivery of HB-TMH: environmental safety, clinical safety, and disposition planning. Through multiple iterations, they agreed upon a final Privacy and Safety Protocol for HB-TMH. The protocol was then operationalized into the Privacy and Safety Assessment Tool (PSA Tool) based on two keystone medical safety constructs: the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist/Time-Out and the Checklist Manifesto. Results: The PSA Tool comprised four modules: (1) Screening for Safety for HB-TMH; (2) Assessment for Safety During the HB-TMH Initial Visit; (3) End of the Initial Visit and Disposition Planning; and (4) the TMH Time-Out and Reassessment during subsequent visits. A sample workflow guides implementation. Conclusions: The Privacy and Safety Protocol and PSA Tool aim to prepare providers for the private and safe delivery of HB-TMH. Its modular format can be adapted to each site's resources. Going forward, the PSA Tool should help to facilitate the integration of HB-TMH into the routine mental health care landscape.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health Services/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Child Health Services/organization & administration , Clinical Protocols/standards , Home Care Services , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Patient Safety , Privacy , Telemedicine , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Computer Communication Networks/standards , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Home Care Services/ethics , Home Care Services/standards , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/methods , United States
2.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
3.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 2021 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263300

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A consortium of 8 academic child and adolescent psychiatry programs in the United States and Canada examined their pivot from in-person, clinic-based services to home-based telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aims were to document the transition across diverse sites and to present recommendations for future telehealth service planning. METHOD: Consortium sites completed a Qualtrics survey assessing site characteristics, telehealth practices, service use, and barriers to and facilitators of telehealth service delivery prior to (pre) and during the early stages of (post) the COVID-19 pandemic. The design is descriptive. RESULTS: All sites pivoted from in-person services to home-based telehealth within 2 weeks. Some sites experienced delays in conducting new intakes, and most experienced delays establishing tele-group therapy. No-show rates and use of telephony versus videoconferencing varied by site. Changes in telehealth practices (eg, documentation requirements, safety protocols) and perceived barriers to telehealth service delivery (eg, regulatory limitations, inability to bill) occurred pre-/post-COVID-19. CONCLUSION: A rapid pivot from in-person services to home-based telehealth occurred at 8 diverse academic programs in the context of a global health crisis. To promote ongoing use of home-based telehealth during future crises and usual care, academic programs should continue documenting the successes and barriers to telehealth practice to promote equitable and sustainable telehealth service delivery in the future.

5.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(7): 404-413, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637071

ABSTRACT

Objective: Telemental health (TMH) is not well described for mental health service delivery during crises. Most child and adolescent psychiatry training programs have not integrated TMH into their curricula and are ill equipped to respond during crises to their patients' needs. In this study, we present the implementation of a home-based TMH (HB-TMH) service during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We describe the technological, administrative, training, and clinical implementation components involved in transitioning a comprehensive outpatient child and adolescent psychiatry program to a HB-TMH virtual clinic. Results: The transition was accomplished in 6 weeks. Most in-clinic services were rapidly moved off campus to the home. Owing to challenges encountered with each implementation component, phone sessions bridged the transition from in-clinic to reliable virtual appointments. Within 3 weeks (March 20, 2020) of planning for HB-TMH, 67% of all appointments were conducted at home, and within 4 weeks (March 27, 2020), 90% were conducted at home. By week 6 (April 3, 2020), reliable HB-TMH appointments were implemented. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic crisis created the opportunity to innovate a solution to disrupted care for our established patients and to create a resource for youth who developed problems during the crisis. Our department was experienced in providing TMH services that facilitated the transition to HB-TMH, yet still had to overcome known and unanticipated challenges. Our experience provides a roadmap for establishing a HB-TMH service with focus on rapid implementation. It also demonstrates a role for TMH during (rather than after) future crises when usual community resources are not available.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Home Care Services , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Washington/epidemiology
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