Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
iScience ; 24(11): 103215, 2021 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446746

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a life-threatening disease occurring several weeks after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Deep immune profiling showed acute MIS-C patients had highly activated neutrophils, classical monocytes and memory CD8+ T-cells, with increased frequencies of B-cell plasmablasts and double-negative B-cells. Post treatment samples from the same patients, taken during symptom resolution, identified recovery-associated immune features including increased monocyte CD163 levels, emergence of a new population of immature neutrophils and, in some patients, transiently increased plasma arginase. Plasma profiling identified multiple features shared by MIS-C, Kawasaki Disease and COVID-19 and that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 may be preferable to IL-1 or TNF-α. We identified several potential mechanisms of action for IVIG, the most commonly used drug to treat MIS-C. Finally, we showed systemic complement activation with high plasma C5b-9 levels is common in MIS-C suggesting complement inhibitors could be used to treat the disease.

2.
Eur J Pediatr ; 180(6): 1975-1979, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083097

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-COV-2 virus fortunately resulted in few children suffering from severe disease. However, the collateral effects on the COVID-19 pandemic appear to have had significant detrimental effects on children affected and young people. There are also some positive impacts in the form of reduced prevalence of viral bronchiolitis. The new strain of SARS-COV-2 identified recently in the UK appears to have increased transmissibility to children. However, there are no large vaccine trials set up in children to evaluate safety and efficacy. In this short communication, we review the collateral effects of COVID-19 pandemic in children and young people. We highlight the need for urgent strategies to mitigate the risks to children due to the COVID-19 pandemic. What is Known: • Children and young people account for <2% of all COVID-19 hospital admissions • The collateral impact of COVID-19 pandemic on children and young people is devastating • Significant reduction in influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in the southern hemisphere What is New: • The public health measures to reduce COVID-19 infection may have also resulted in near elimination of influenza and RSV infections across the globe • A COVID-19 vaccine has been licensed for adults. However, large scale vaccine studies are yet to be initiated although there is emerging evidence of the new SARS-COV-2 strain spreading more rapidly though young people. • Children and young people continue to bear the collateral effects of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Clin Exp Allergy ; 51(3): 393-401, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059747

ABSTRACT

Children and young people with asthma need regular monitoring to maintain good asthma control, prevent asthma attacks and manage comorbidities. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in healthcare professionals making fundamental changes to the way healthcare is delivered and for patients and families adapting to these changes. Comprehensive remotely delivered, technology-based healthcare, closer to the patients home (reducing hospital footfall and possibly reducing carbon footprint) is likely to be one of the important collateral effects of the pandemic. Telemedicine is anticipated to impact everyone involved in healthcare - providers and patients alike. It is going to bring changes to organization, work areas and work culture in healthcare. Healthcare providers, policymakers and those accessing healthcare services will experience the impact of technology-based healthcare delivery. Telemedicine can play an exciting role in the management of childhood asthma by delivering high-quality care closer to the child's home. However, unlike adults, children still need to be accompanied by their carers for virtual care. Policymakers will need to take into account potential additional costs as well as the legal, ethical and cultural implications of large scale use of telemedicine. In this narrative review, we review evidence regarding the role of telemedicine and related emerging technologies in paediatric and adolescent asthma. Although there are gaps in the current knowledge, there is evidence demonstrating the important role of telemedicine in management of childhood and adolescent asthma. However, there is an urgent need for healthcare researchers and policymakers to focus on improving the technologies and address the disparities in accessing novel technology-based management strategies to improve asthma care.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Child , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Spirometry
4.
J Asthma ; 58(12): 1597-1598, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814021

ABSTRACT

During the Covid19 pandemic there has been much discussion about in-hospital procedures that may generate aerosols. One such procedure, that has led to confusion and concern, is nebulisation of children. In this paper, we discuss the evidence around whether nebulisation procedures generate aerosols, and offer strategies around nebulisation of children with asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Aerosols , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Health Personnel , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
7.
Hosp Pediatr ; 10(9): 802-805, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Reports from China relating to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in children indicate a milder disease course compared with adults. Although a few pediatric COVID-19 reports from other parts of the world exist, there are none from the United Kingdom. We describe the clinical characteristics of children with COVID-19 admitted to a specialist children's hospital in United Kingdom. METHODS: Retrospective case-series of inpatients with a positive polymerase chain reaction test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, during a 6-week period from March 14 to April 24, 2020. RESULTS: Forty-five children tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 during the study period. Median (interquartile range) age was 3.5 (0.7-12) years, and 31 (69%) were male. Children with comorbidities constituted 64% (29 of 45) of the study population, including 44% (20 of 45) who were considered "extremely vulnerable." Fever (67%) and cough (55%) were the most common symptoms. High C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) was observed in 68% (19 of 28). Lymphopenia (<1.2 × 109/L) was observed in 23% (9 of 40) of children, but it was related to coexisting medical conditions in 6 children. Nine children required supplemental oxygen, two of whom received high-flow nasal cannula oxygen; one needed noninvasive ventilation and one child required invasive mechanical ventilation. Median length of stay of children with an admission outcome (n = 42, 93%) was 3 (2-7) days. There were no COVID-19-related deaths. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a relatively mild course of illness in majority of the hospitalized children that included a subgroup of vulnerable children with significant comorbidities. Confirmation of this in larger nationwide studies of children is required.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Status , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...