Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
Prev Med Rep ; 28: 101900, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926845

ABSTRACT

Adolescents are particularly vulnerable to health misinformation and are at risk for suboptimal adherence to protective health behaviors in the COVID-19 pandemic. Guided by factors consistent with the theories of planned behavior and rumor transmission, this study sought to analyze the impact of multiple information sources, including social media, television media, internet and parental counseling, on masking behaviors in adolescents. Responses from the December 2020 COVID-19 survey, representing 4,106 U.S. adolescents ages 12-14 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD) were analyzed. The majority of parents (61.1%) reported counseling their children on the importance of wearing masks all the time in the past week. A minority of adolescents reported more than one hour of daily exposure to COVID-19 related information on social media (9.1%), the internet (4.3%) and television (10.2%). In unadjusted and adjusted models, greater frequency of parental counseling and exposure to COVID-19 television or social media were associated with 'always masking' behaviors. Our findings provide support for the importance of parent counseling and suggest that socialmedia and television may overall support rather than dissuade protective COVID-19 health behaviors in adolescents.

3.
J Adolesc Health ; 70(6): 985-988, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783448

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Young adult anxiety/depression (mental health) symptoms have increased from prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study assessed young adult (aged 18-25 years) anxiety/depressive symptoms, mental health care utilization (prescription drug use, counseling, and/or either), and unmet counseling/therapy needs utilizing the national Household Pulse Survey data from June to July 2021. METHODS: Young adult (n = 2,809) rates and subgroup differences in mental health symptoms (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2 and/or Patient Health Questionnaire-2) were assessed, as were mental health care utilization and unmet counseling/therapy needs. RESULTS: In total, 48% of young adults had mental health symptoms. Among those, 39% received treatment and 36% reported unmet mental health counseling/therapy needs. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight young adults' ongoing mental health needs and low services receipt. Interventions and further research to reduce barriers to seeking and utilizing mental health care and to increase the capacity of providers to deliver culturally appropriate mental health care are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Young Adult
5.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 332, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690939

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the agreement between parent- and adolescent- reports of adolescent moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) and to determine sociodemographic factors associated with MVPA reporting differences during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We analyzed data collected in May 2020 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD, N = 4841), a U.S. prospective cohort study. We quantified past weekly adolescent MVPA levels as reported by the parent and adolescent (referent). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine the degree of agreement between parent- and adolescent- reports. RESULTS: When quantifying adolescent MVPA during the same recall period, median (p25, p75) MVPA (h∙wk.- 1) was 2.17 (0.00, 6.00) as reported by adolescents and 1.52 (0.29, 4.75) by parents with a mean difference of 4.89. Statistically significant differences in reports of MVPA were found in households with income > $75,000: on average, adolescents reported higher MVPA levels than their parents. Bland-Altman plots illustrated that, among adolescents reporting no or little MVPA, there was higher parent-adolescent agreement. However, among adolescents reporting high levels of MVPA, there was less agreement between the parent- and adolescent- reports. CONCLUSIONS: Despite more time spent together at home during the pandemic, there was generally low agreement between parent- and adolescent- reports of adolescent MVPA. Future research could examine parent-adolescent agreement of MVPA within the context of device-based measures (e.g., accelerometers), determine reasons for differences in parent-adolescent reporting of MVPA, and inform interventions for improved parental involvement and monitoring of MVPA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Parents , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Acad Pediatr ; 22(3): 413-421, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623287

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the relationship between parent and adolescent reports of adolescent recreational screen time and to determine sociodemographic predictors of recreational screen time reporting differences during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (N = 5335, ages 10-14) a national prospective cohort study in the United States collected in May 2020. We compared parent-reported, adolescent-reported, and a parent-adolescent differences in recreational screen time hours per day across 5 screen categories. RESULTS: Adolescents' total recreational screen time per day was reported as 4.46 hours by parents and 3.87 hours by adolescents. Parents reported higher levels of their child's texting, video chatting, and total recreational screen time, while adolescents reported higher multiplayer gaming and social media use. Larger discrepancies in total recreational screen time were found in older, Black, and Latino/Hispanic adolescents. Larger discrepancies in total recreational screen time were also found among unmarried/unpartnered parents. CONCLUSIONS: Given discrepancies in parent-adolescent recreational screen time reporting during the pandemic, a period of high screen use, pediatricians should encourage family discussions about adolescent media use through the development of a Family Media Use Plan. The digital media industry could provide more opportunities for parental monitoring of recreational screen time within product designs.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adolescent Behavior/psychology , Aged , Child , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parents , Prospective Studies , Screen Time , United States/epidemiology
7.
Prev Med Rep ; 25: 101685, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586853

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate adolescents' moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) during the COVID-19 pandemic with regards to sociodemographic characteristics and determine mental health and resiliency factors associated with MVPA among a diverse national sample of adolescents ages 10-14 years. Data were collected during the pandemic in May 2020 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD, N = 5,153), a national prospective cohort study in the U.S. MVPA was quantified as the product of reported duration and frequency (hours per week), which was further summarized as the proportion meeting age-appropriate 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. A similar estimate was generated using MVPA data collected prior to the pandemic. Mental health and resiliency measures were collected during the pandemic. Regression models examined associations between mental health or resiliency measures and MVPA during the pandemic. Median MVPA was 2 h per week (IQR 0, 6). Overall, the percentage of the cohort meeting MVPA guidelines decreased from 16.1% (pre-pandemic) to 8.9% (during the pandemic). Racial/ethnic minority adolescents and adolescents from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were significantly less likely to meet MVPA guidelines during the pandemic. Poorer mental health, COVID-related worry, and stress were associated with lower MVPA, while more social support and coping behaviors were associated with higher MVPA during the pandemic. In this large, national sample of adolescents, the proportion of those meeting MVPA Guidelines was lower during the COVID-19 pandemic, with significant disparities by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Interventions to promote social support and coping behaviors may improve MVPA levels among adolescents during the pandemic.

9.
Public Health Nutr ; 25(1): 76-81, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361603

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between food insufficiency and mental health service utilisation in the USA during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between food insufficiency and mental health service utilisation. SETTING: US Census Household Pulse Survey data collected in October 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Nationally representative sample of 68 611 US adults. RESULTS: After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, experiencing food insufficiency was associated with higher odds of unmet mental health need (adjusted OR (AOR) 2·90; 95 % CI 2·46, 3·43), receiving mental health counselling or therapy (AOR 1·51; 95 % CI 1·24, 1·83) and psychotropic medication use (AOR 1·56; 95 % CI 1·35, 1·80). Anxiety and depression symptoms mediated most of the association between food insufficiency and unmet mental health need but not the associations between food insufficiency and either receiving mental health counselling/therapy or psychotropic medication use. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should regularly screen patients for food insufficiency, especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Expanding access to supplemental food programmes may help to mitigate the need for higher mental health service utilisation during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Counseling , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Adolesc Health ; 69(3): 511-514, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309261

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Young adults have the highest cumulative incidence of COVID-19 infection in the country. Using March 2021 Household Pulse Survey data, an ongoing, cross-sectional nationally representative survey, we examined U.S. young adult intention to accept COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: Young adult (ages 18-25 years) Household Pulse Survey participants were queried on intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and related perspectives (N = 5,082). RESULTS: Most unvaccinated respondents (76%) indicated an intention to become vaccinated. The most frequently cited reasons for potentially rejecting vaccination included desire to wait and see if the vaccine is safe (56%); concerns over side effects (53%); and believing others are in greater need of the vaccine (44%). CONCLUSIONS: With 24% of young adults hesitant to accept a COVID-19 vaccine, public health interventions should target reasons for hesitancy, address concerns about safety and side effects, and underscore the importance of vaccinations for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination , Young Adult
11.
Psychiatr Serv ; 73(2): 206-209, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288491

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of unmet need for mental health counseling among U.S. adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data from the December 9-21, 2020, cross-sectional Household Pulse Survey (N=69,944) were analyzed. RESULTS: Overall, 12.8% of adults reported an unmet need for mental health counseling in the past month, including 25.2% of adults with a positive screen for depression or anxiety. Among adults with a positive screen, risk factors associated with an unmet need for mental health counseling included female sex, younger age, income below the federal poverty line, higher education, and household job loss during the pandemic, while protective factors included Asian and Black race. CONCLUSIONS: Over one-quarter of U.S. adults with a positive screen for depression or anxiety experienced an unmet need for mental health counseling during the pandemic. Policy makers should consider increasing funding for mental health services as part of pandemic relief legislation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Counseling , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Am J Prev Med ; 60(4): 453-461, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014305

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the rates of food insecurity and mental illness have been projected to increase in the U.S. owing to significant social and economic disruption. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of food insufficiency (often the most extreme form of food insecurity), the correlates of food insufficiency, and the associations between food insufficiency and symptoms of poor mental health in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from 63,674 participants of the U.S. Census Household Pulse Survey were collected and analyzed in 2020. Multiple Poisson regression models were used to estimate associations with food insufficiency. RESULTS: Food insufficiency rose from 8.1% to 10.0% from March to June 2020. Factors associated with food insufficiency included lower age, Black/African American or Latinx race/ethnicity, being unmarried, larger household size, recent employment loss, income below the federal poverty line, and lower education (all p<0.001). Food insufficiency was independently associated with all symptoms of poor mental health, adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic factors (adjusted RRs ranged from 1.16 to 1.42, all p<0.001). The association between food insufficiency and poor mental health was attenuated among people who received free groceries or meals. CONCLUSIONS: Food insufficiency has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic and affects vulnerable populations, placing individuals at higher risk for symptoms of poor mental health. Particularly in the current crisis, clinicians should regularly screen patients for food insufficiency and mental health outcomes as well as provide support in accessing appropriate resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Insecurity/economics , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/economics , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Supply/economics , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health/economics , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
14.
J Adolesc Health ; 68(1): 53-56, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922023

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to estimate the associations between job insecurity and symptoms of anxiety and depression among U.S. young adults amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We analyzed data on young adults aged 18-26 years from June 15 to June 30, 2020, from the weekly, cross-sectional Household Pulse Survey (n = 4,852) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Two job insecurity measures and four anxiety and depression measures were analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression models adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and marital status. RESULTS: Fifty-nine percent of participants experienced direct or household employment loss since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and 38% were expected to experience direct or household employment loss in the coming 4 weeks. Recent direct or household employment loss and expected direct or household employment loss, among participants who did not experience recent employment loss, were associated with a greater risk of poor mental health on all four measures. CONCLUSIONS: U.S. young adults experience a significant mental health burden as a result of job insecurity amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19/psychology , Depression , Employment/economics , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/ethnology , Anxiety/psychology , Censuses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/ethnology , Depression/psychology , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , United States , Young Adult
15.
Adv Nutr ; 12(2): 287-290, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792984

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, food insecurity has doubled overall and tripled among households with children in the United States. Food insecurity and COVID-19 may exacerbate one another through bidirectional links, leading to a syndemic, or sequential disease clusters, which exacerbate one another. Experiencing food insecurity may be associated with macronutrient and micronutrient deficiencies, which can weaken host defenses, thus increasing susceptibility to COVID-19. Food insecurity is associated with chronic medical conditions, which may afford a higher risk of severe COVID-19 illness. People experiencing food insecurity may have increased exposure to COVID-19 while procuring food. People with COVID-19 may be unable to work, generate income, and procure food while quarantined, which may exacerbate food insecurity. Clinicians should screen for food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide referrals to food-assistance programs when appropriate. Policymakers should expand benefits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to address increases in the depth and breadth of food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Assistance , Food Insecurity , Pandemics , Food Supply , Humans , Poverty , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL