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1.
2021 IEEE International Conference on Technology, Research, and Innovation for Betterment of Society, TRIBES 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1831872

ABSTRACT

In the current scenario, almost all the countries face one of the biggest disasters in COVID-19. This paper has to analyze the tweets related to COVID 19 and discuss the various machine learning algorithms and their performance analysis on the tweets associated with COVID-19. The implemented classification algorithms are applied to classify the sentiments to predict whether they relate to COVID-19 or non-COVID-19. Ten most popular classification algorithms implemented. The Linear Support Vector Machine (LSVM) achieved the highest test accuracy in these algorithms with 90.3%. Logistic regression has performed better in recall with 96.06%, F1 score of 90.46%, ROC_AUC with 90.48%. Random forest classifier has achieved the better specificity and precision of 99.16% and 96.3%, respectively. Out of all, stochastic gradient descent (SGD) has attained better results in all the computational parameters. © 2021 IEEE.

2.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816885

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A better understanding of the reality for cancer patients during COVID-19 will help us readapt current predication models. To further inform future clinical guidelines, we need a deep dive into rich data sources from apex Cancer Centres. We report on the outcomes of cancer patients receiving radical surgery between March-September 2020 (as well as 2019) in the European Institute of Oncology (EIO) in Milan and the South East London Cancer Alliance (SELCA). Methods: IEO is one of the largest cancer hospitals in Italy. SELCA includes 3 major hospital trust, treating about 8,000 new cancer patients per annum. Both institutions implemented a COVID-19 minimal pathway, whereby patients were required to shield for 14 days prior to admission and were swabbed for COVID-19 within 3 days of surgery. Positive patients had surgery deferred until a negative swab. Surgical outcomes assessed were: ASA grade, surgery time, theatre time, ICU stay>24h, pneumonia, length of stay (LOS), and admissions. For COVID-19, we focused on infection rate and mortality. Results: At IEO the number of radical surgeries (270 for gynaecological, 339 for head and neck, 377 for thoracic, and 491 for urological cancers) declined by 6% as compared to the same period in 2019 (n=1477 vs 1560). The main decline was observed for thoracic surgery (377 vs 460, i.e. -18%). Age, sex, SES, ethnicity, comorbidities, and performance status were all comparable between both periods (e.g. 58% male, 38% aged 70+, 48% high SES, 15% with existing cardiovascular diseases). Readmissions were required for 39%, and <1% (n=9) developed COVID-19, of which only 1 had severe disease and died. 11 died of other causes during follow-up (1%). At SELCA, the number of radical surgeries (321 for breast, 129 for colorectal, 114 for gynaecological, 152 for head and neck, 92 for liver, 56 for plastics/skin, 305 for thoracic, 72 for upper gastrointestinal, and 312 for urology) declined by 29% (n=1553 vs 2182). Even though a different geographical setting, characteristics were fairly comparable with the IEO: 58% males, 30% aged 70+, 34% high SES, 16% with existing cardiovascular diseases. Readmissions were required for 22%, <1% (n=7) developed COVID-19, and none died from it. 19 died of other causes within 30 days (1%). Conclusion: Milan and London were both at the epicentre of the first COVID-19 wave. Whilst a decline in number of surgeries was observed, the implemented COVID-19 minimal pathways have shown to be safe for cancer patients requiring radical treatment, with limited complications and almost no COVID-19 infections.

3.
Blood ; 138(SUPPL 1):3525, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1770434

ABSTRACT

Background - The WINDOW-1 regimen introduced first-line ibrutinib with rituximab (IR) followed by 4 cycles of R-HCVAD for younger mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients (pts) demonstrating 90% CR on IR alone and we aimed to improve the CR rate with the addition of venetoclax. We therefore investigated the efficacy and safety of IR and venetoclax (IRV) followed by risk-stratified observation or short course R-HCVAD/MTX-ARA-C as consolidation in previously untreated young patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Our aim was to use a triplet chemotherapy-free induction to reduce the toxicity, complications and minimize chemotherapy exposure in MCL pts. Methods - We enrolled 50 previously untreated pts in this single institution, single arm, phase II clinical trial - NCT03710772. Pts received IR induction (Part-1) for initial 4 cycles. Pts were restaged at cycle 4 and received IRV for up to eight cycles (Cycle 5 to Cycle 12) starting with ramp up venetoclax dosing in Cycle 5. All pts who achieved CR prior to cycle 12 continued to receive IRV for 4 cycles (maximum 12 cycles) and then moved to part 2. Pts were stratified into three disease risk groups: high, moderate and low risk categories from the baseline data for assignment to R-HCVAD/MTX-ARA-C as consolidation in part 2 (4 cycles, 2 cycles, or no chemotherapy for high, medium and low risk pts respectively). Briefly, low risk pts were those with Ki-67 ≤30%, largest tumor mass <3 cm, low MIPI score and no features of high risk disease (Ki-67 ≥50%, mutations in the TP53, NSD2 or in NOTCH genes, complex karyotype or del17p, MYC positive, or largest tumor diameter >5 cm or blastoid/pleomorphic histology or if they remain in PR after 12 cycles of part 1. Medium risk are pts which did not belong to low or high-risk category. Those who experienced progression on part 1 went to part 2 and get 4 cycles of part 2. Patient were taken off protocol but not off study, if they remained in PR after 4 cycles of chemotherapy, these patients were followed up for time to next treatment and progression free survival on subsequent therapies. After part 2 consolidation, all pts received 2 years of IRV maintenance. The primary objective was to assess CR rates after IRV induction. Adverse events were coded as per CTCAE version 4. Molecular studies are being performed. Results - Among the 50 pts, the median age was 57 years (range - 35-65). There were 20 pts in high-risk group, 20 pts in intermediate-risk group and 10 pts in low-risk group. High Ki-67 (≥30%) in 18/50 (36%) pts. Eighteen (36%) had high and intermediate risk simplified MIPI scores. Six (12%) pts had aggressive MCL (blastoid/pleomorphic). Among the 24 TP53 evaluable pts, eight pts (33%) had TP53 aberrations (mutated and/or TP53 deletion by FISH). Forty-eight pts received IRV. Best response to IRV was 96% and CR of 92%. After part 2, the best ORR remained unaltered, 96% (92% CR and 4% PR). The median number of cycles of triplet IRV to reach best response was 8 cycles (range 2-12). Fifteen pts (30%) did not receive part 2 chemotherapy, two pts (4%) received 1 cycle, 16 pts (32%) 2 cycles and 13 pts (26%) got 4 cycles of chemotherapy. With a median follow up of 24 months, the median PFS and OS were not reached (2 year 92% and 90% respectively). The median PFS and OS was not reached and not significantly different in pts with high and low Ki-67% or with/without TP53 aberrations or among pts with low, medium or high-risk categories. The median PFS and OS was inferior in blastoid/pleomorphic MCL pts compared to classic MCL pts (p=0.01 and 0.03 respectively). Thirteen pts (26%) came off study - 5 for adverse events, 3 for on study deaths, and 2 for patient choice, 2 patients lost to follow up and one for disease progression. Overall, 5 pts died (3 on trial and 2 pts died off study, one due to progressive disease and another due to COVID pneumonia). Grade 3-4 toxicities on part 1 were 10% myelosuppression and 10% each with fatigue, myalgia and rashes and 3% mucositis. One pt developed grade 3 atrial flutter on part 1. None had grade 3-4 bleeding/bruising. Conclusions - Chemotherapy-free induction with IRV induced durable and deep responses in young MCL pts in the frontline setting. WINDOW-2 approach suggests that pts with low risk MCL do not need chemotherapy but further follow up is warranted. This combined modality treatment approach significantly improves outcomes of young MCL pts across all risk groups. Detailed molecular analyses will be reported. (Figure Presented).

4.
Blood ; 138(SUPPL 1):133, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1770356

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphomas associated with poor outcomes following anthracycline-based chemotherapy, even when consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is used. CD30 expression is universal in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and is frequently expressed in other PTCL subtypes. Brentuximab vedotin (BV) is a CD30-directed antibody drug conjugate that prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) when combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHP) as compared to CHOP chemotherapy (Horwitz, 2020). Although a majority of pts treated with BV-CHP remained in durable remission (5y PFS 51%), there is room for improvement. Based on retrospective studies that demonstrated improved outcomes in younger pts, the addition of etoposide to CHOP (CHOEP) is commonly used as initial therapy for PTCL. We performed a multicenter phase 2 trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding etoposide to BV-CHP (CHEP-BV) followed by BV consolidation in pts with newly diagnosed CD30-expressing PTCL. Methods: Adults with newly diagnosed CD30+ (≥ 1% of tumor cells by local pathology) PTCL were eligible, including pts with ALK+ ALCL and IPI score ≥ 2, ALK-negative ALCL, PTCL not otherwise specified (NOS), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), adult Tcell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), among others. After accrual of 28 pts, the protocol was amended to allow enrollment of 20 additional pts with CD30+ non-ALCL PTCL (with ALCL allowed in Canada). Pts could receive prephase steroids and/or 1 cycle of CHOPequivalent chemotherapy prior to study entry. 6 pts were treated in a safety lead-in cohort and all pts received CHEP-BV at the recommended phase 2 dose: 6 x 21-day cycles of CHP+BV (1.8mg/kg) on d1 and etoposide 100mg/m2 on d1-3. G-CSF prophylaxis was mandatory. Pts in response after CHEP-BV could receive BV consolidation (1.8mg/kg q3w) for up to 10 additional cycles (16 total BV cycles) either after ASCT or CHEP-BV if no ASCT was performed. The co-primary endpoints were safety and the CR rate (Deauville score 1-3) by PET-CT after CHEP-BV assessed by investigators according to the 2014 Lugano classification. Secondary endpoints were PFS and OS. Results: Accrual has completed and 48 pts were enrolled;all were evaluable for toxicity, 46 were evaluable for efficacy. 16 pts had ALCL (13 ALK+, 3 ALK-) and 32 had non-ALCL PTCL subtypes, including 18 with AITL, 11 with PTCL NOS, 2 with T-follicular helper PTCL, and 1 with ATLL. Baseline characteristics are shown in Table. 43 pts completed CHEP-BV, 2 had progressive disease (PD) prior to completion, 1 pt discontinued CHEP-BV early (MD discretion), 1 pt died due to COVID-19, and 1 remains on CHEP-BV. Of 43 pts who completed CHEP-BV, 24 proceeded to ASCT and 19 did not. 33 (74%) pts received BV consolidation (20 after ASCT, 13 directly after CHEP-BV) and completed a median 8 of the planned 10 cycles (range, 1-10). 13 pts completed all cycles of consolidation;19 pts discontinued early-12 due to adverse events (AE), 5 due to PD, and 2 due to patient/physician choice. The most frequent CHEP-BV related AEs (all grades, G) include fatigue (73%), peripheral sensory neuropathy (67%), anemia (62.5%), nausea (56%), neutropenia (50%), lymphopenia (44%), leukopenia (42%), thrombocytopenia (40%), elevated transaminases (33%). The most common G3+ AEs were neutropenia (37.5%), febrile neutropenia (23%), lymphopenia (21%), anemia (19%), thrombocytopenia (19%). There were 5 deaths, 4 due to PD and 1 due to COVID-19 infection during C3 of CHEP-BV. The interim (n=46) ORR and CR rates (after 3 CHEP-BV cycles, except 1 pt after 2) were 96% and 59% (27 CR, 17 PR), respectively. At completion of CHEP-BV (n=46), the ORR was 91% with 80% CR (37 CR, 5 PR, 4 PD). The ORR/CR rates in ALCL (n=16) vs non-ALCL (n=30) pts were 94%/94% vs 90%/73%, respectively. The ORR/CR rates in pts with CD30 expression 1-9% (n=15) vs 10+% (n=31) were 93%/67% and 90%/87%, respectively. The median follow-up in surviving pts is 1 .1 months (range, 0.9-32.5). The overall 18mo PFS and OS were 61% and 89%;18mo PFS by subgroup: ALCL 81%, non-ALCL 49%, CD30 1-9% 48%, CD30 10+% 67%. Landmark 1y PFS from end of CHEP-BV in responding pts (n=41) was 82% in pts who underwent ASCT vs 48% in pts who did not Conclusions: In a cohort of pts with mostly non-ALCL CD30-expressing PTCL, CHEP-BV (+/-ASCT) followed by BV consolidation was tolerable and effective.

5.
12th International Conference on Computing Communication and Networking Technologies, ICCCNT 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1752372

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 that can arouse a respiratory tract infection. Therefore, a rapid identification of clearly visualized infections is urgently needed, which can assist early diagnosis and save the lives of suspected COVID-19 patients.Recent technological progress has made it possible to fuse deep learning classification and medical images that can accelerate and improve the accuracy of results when leveraged. This could particularly be important for disease where faster result and increased accuracy can help early detection of COVID-19 cases vis-à-vis the traditional RT-PCR tests. DNN classifier is designed such that, it automatically detects virus present in lungs using chest image is termed as Bimodal. This research article proposes an automatic frame work for identifying COVID -19 as early using chest X-ray images and CT Scan Images. For this experiment, 3 types of data set are used, 1) COVID X-ray chest 2) CT-scan SARS-COV-2, 3), X-Ray images in the chest (Pneumonia). This deep learning model can detect positive COVID-19 cases more quickly than RT-PCR tests for the detection of COVID-19 cases. The proposed model provides a relationship between COVID-19 patients and pneumonia patients. Color visualization approach on the basis of Grad-CAM is used to clearly interpret image radiology detection. The proposed deep learning model has achieved a total accuracy of 92.33%, with precision and recall of 0.94% and 0.93%. © 2021 IEEE.

6.
Indian Journal of Medical and Paediatric Oncology ; 43(01):5, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1721718
7.
BMC Mol Cell Biol ; 23(1): 2, 2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19 pandemic is a RNA virus prone to mutations. Formation of a stable binding interface between the Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) of host is pivotal for viral entry. RBD has been shown to mutate frequently during pandemic. Although, a few mutations in RBD exhibit enhanced transmission rates leading to rise of new variants of concern, most RBD mutations show sustained ACE2 binding and virus infectivity. Yet, how all these mutations make the binding interface constantly favourable for virus remain enigmatic. This study aims to delineate molecular rearrangements in the binding interface of SARS-CoV-2 RBD mutants. RESULTS: Here, we have generated a mutational and structural landscape of SARS-CoV-2 RBD in first six months of the pandemic. We analyzed 31,403 SARS-CoV-2 genomes randomly across the globe, and identified 444 non-synonymous mutations in RBD that cause 49 distinct amino acid substitutions in contact and non-contact amino acid residues. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggested independent emergence of RBD mutants. Structural mapping of these mutations on the SARS-CoV-2 Wuhan reference strain RBD and structural comparison with RBDs from bat-CoV, SARS-CoV, and pangolin-CoV, all bound to human or mouse ACE2, revealed several changes in the interfacial interactions in all three binding clusters. Interestingly, interactions mediated via N487 residue in cluster-I and Y449, G496, T500, G502 residues in cluster-III remained largely unchanged in all RBD mutants. Further analysis showed that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved in sarbecoviruses which use ACE2 for entry. Importantly, despite extensive changes in the interface, RBD-ACE2 stability and binding affinities were maintained in all the analyzed mutants. Taken together, these findings reveal how SARS-CoV-2 uses its RBD residues to constantly remodel the binding interface. CONCLUSION: Our study broadly signifies understanding virus-host binding interfaces and their alterations during pandemic. Our findings propose a possible interface remodelling mechanism used by SARS-CoV-2 to escape deleterious mutations. Future investigations will focus on functional validation of in-silico findings and on investigating interface remodelling mechanisms across sarbecoviruses. Thus, in long run, this study may provide novel clues to therapeutically target RBD-ACE2 interface for pan-sarbecovirus infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Mice , Mutation , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
8.
Blood ; 138:2752, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582239

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pomalidomide is a third-generation immunomodulatory drug approved for relapsed and/or refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM). In the phase 3 OPTIMISMM trial, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone demonstrated superior efficacy in patients with RRMM. PRIME study (CTRI/2019/10/021618) is testing this combination in Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM) Aim: To determine safety of Pomalidomide in combination with Bortezomib and dexamethasone (VPD) in NDMM Study design: A prospective, single arm, phase II study from a tertiary center. Both transplant eligible and ineligible patients with NDMM aged between 18-70 years are being recruited in the study. Patients with Plasma cell leukemia, POEMS and amyloidosis were excluded. The regimen consists of weekly Bortezomib 1.3mg/sq.m (subcutaneous), Tab. Pomalidomide 2-4mg once daily for 21days, and Tab Dexamethasone 20mg twice weekly, with the cycle repeating every 28 days, 9-12 cycles. Here we report the adverse events (AE) by NCI CTCAE v5.0, upon recruiting 26 patients, as predetermined in the study. Results: Of the proposed 45-50 patients, 26 patients were enrolled in the study between April 2020 to May 2021 and 23 (88.4%) have completed 4 cycles of VPD. The median age is 55years (18-70), and gender ratio 1:1. At disease presentation, bone lesions were the commonest (96.2%, n=25), IMWG high risk cytogenetics were seen in 42.4% (n=11), RISS-2 in 69.3% (n=18), IgG kappa paraproteinemia in 54% (n=14) patients and ECOG performance score 2-3 in 57.6%(n=15). Ten (38.5%) patients have completed 9 cycles, and 3 underwent auto-transplant (between Cycle 4 & 6). Protocol adherence was 96.1% (25/26 patients). Table-1 shows drug-induced toxicity, hematological toxicities were the commonest. Two patients withdrew consent in view of bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy. Serious adverse events (SAE) were reported in 9 (34.6%) patients and were considered unrelated to the regimen by the safety committee (PSVT=1, Bony pain=2, dyspnea=1, pneumonia=1, constipation=1, diarrhea=1, hypotension=1) and one death due to SARS-CoV2 pneumonia. Treatment delays of 2 weeks in 4 patients (SARS-CoV2 = 3, Syncope = 1) After 4 cycles (n=23), 6 (26%) patients were in stringent Complete Response (sCR), 17(74%) in Very Good partial response (VGPR) and 13 (56.5%) are Measurable Residual Disease (MRD) negative. Of 10 patients who completed cycle 9, 9 were MRD negative and 1 showed disease progression. Conclusion: Safety data from the PRIME study demonstrates that VPD regimen has a favorable tolerance profile in patients with NDMM. Early efficacy signals are encouraging, and recruitment continues. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Radhakrishnan: Dr Reddy's Laboratories: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Emcure Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Intas Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Janssen India: Honoraria;NATCO Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Novartis India: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Roche India: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;AstraZeneca India: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Bristol-Myers-Squibb India: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Cipla Pharmaceuticals India: Research Funding;Aurigene: Speakers Bureau. Garg: Dr Reddys Laboratories: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau. Nair: Dr Reddy's Laboratories: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau;Intas pharmaceuticals: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Mylan pharmaceuticals: Honoraria;Novartis India: Honoraria;Fresenius Kabi India: Honoraria;Cipla Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Janssen India: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau. Chandy: Janssen: Honoraria;Pfizer: Honoraria;Intas Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding.

10.
Turk. J. Electr. Eng. Comput. Sci. ; 29:2716-2727, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1478167

ABSTRACT

One of the most significant pandemics has been raised in the form of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID19). Many researchers have faced various types of challenges for finding the accurate model, which can automatically detect the COVID-19 using computed pulmonary tomography (CT) scans of the chest. This paper has also focused on the same area, and a fully automatic model has been developed, which can predict the COVID-19 using the chest CT scans. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated by classifying the CT scans of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and other non-pneumonia. The proposed deep learning model is based on ResNet 50, named CORNet for the detection of COVID-19, and also performed the retrospective and multicenter analysis for the extraction of visual characteristics from volumetric chest CT scans during COVID-19 detection. Between August 2016 and May 2020, the datasets were obtained from six hospitals. Results are evaluated on the image dataset consisting of a total of 10,052 CT scan images generated from 7850 patients, and the average age of the patients was 50 years. The implemented model has achieved the sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 96%, per scanned image with an AUC of 0. 95.

11.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 56: 103317, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register (UKMSR) established an electronic case return form, designed collaboratively by MS neurologists, to record data about COVID-19 infections in people with MS (pwMS). OBJECTIVES: Examine how hospital admission and mortality are affected by disability, age and disease modifying treatments (DMTs) in people with Multiple Sclerosis with COVID-19. METHODS: Anonymised data were submitted by clinical teams. Regression models were tested for predictors of hospitalisation and mortality outcomes. Separate analyzes compared the first and second 'waves' of the pandemic. RESULTS: Univariable analysis found hospitalisation and mortality were associated with increasing age, male gender, comorbidities, severe disability, and progressive MS; severe disability showed the highest magnitude of association. Being on a DMT was associated with a small, lower risk. Multivariable analysis found only age and male gender were significant. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that factors were significant for hospitalisation but not mortality. In the second wave, hospitalisation and mortality were lower. Separate models of the first and second wave using age and gender found they had a more important role in the second wave. CONCLUSIONS: Features associated with poor outcome in COVID-19 are similar to other populations and being on a DMT was not found to be associated with adverse outcomes, consistent with smaller studies. Once in hospital, no factors were predictive of mortality. Reassuringly, mortality appears lower in the second wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Male , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Neurology ; 96(15 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1407837

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess factors associated with recovery from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) Background: It is important to understand the recovery process from COVID-19 among pwMS to identify those who are most vulnerable to the long-term sequelae of infection. Design/Methods: The UK MS Register COVID-19 study is a community-based prospective cohort of pwMS launched on March 17th, 2020. We have been collecting data from participants (n=6,618 as of October 5th, 2020) every two weeks from the time of their enrolment in the study. We ask participants about COVID-19 and follow them through their recovery. The UK MS Register holds pre-COVID-19 longitudinal and prospectively collected patient-reported data including web-based Expanded Disability Status Scale (webEDSS), MS Impact Scale (MSIS-29), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores. Results: Out of 709 participants with self-diagnosed COVID-19, 391 responded to the follow-up questionnaires. 76% (n=297) had fully recovered, 15.9% (n=62) had mostly recovered, and 8.2% (n=32) were still experiencing symptoms at the time of their latest follow-up. Among participants with full recovery, the median (IQR) duration of disease was 10 (6-21) days. Participants who had not recovered completely had been followed up for a median (IQR) duration of 105 (35-131) days. PwMS who had a higher webEDSS score (OR 0.78, 95%CI 0.65-0.93) or physical component of MSIS-29 score (OR 0.97, 95%CI 0.96-0.98) were less likely to report a full recovery. The presence of anxiety (HADS-anxiety ≥11), recorded the year before the pandemic, was associated with a lower probability of complete recovery (OR 0.26, 95%CI 0.10-0.66). Demographics, diseasemodifying therapies, MS duration, or type of MS were not associated with recovery. Conclusions: Physical disability and anxiety prior to the pandemic are the main determinants of persistent COVID-19 symptoms among people with MS.

13.
International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1354370

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The study aims to co-create a “priority action roadmap for women's economic empowerment” based on women's top priorities to charting recovery directions. Doing so contributes to the growing body of knowledge on COVID-19 literature in at least four areas: assessing COVID-19 impacts on women entrepreneurs;mapping these impacts with four interdependent women's entrepreneurial ecosystem components;innovating a co-creation methodology based on remote participatory research;and providing a replicable model to perform action-oriented research in the context of COVID-19 impacts. Design/methodology/approach: A co-creation methodology is proposed, combining systems-thinking and remote participatory research to engage women entrepreneurs and institutional stakeholders to prioritize impact, response actions and recovery needs in the wake of COVID-19. A ranking exercise using the analytic hierarchy process was used to derive ranking and assess user inputs' consistency. Findings: The study exemplifies the integration of participatory methods and mathematical tool to engage stakeholders in prioritizing recovery work. PARWEE action items ranked by entrepreneurs and vetted by institutional stakeholders cover: access to finances, capacity building, health care, public and private partnership, marketing opportunities and formation of active advocacy groups to voice out women entrepreneurs' needs to institutional stakeholders. Results show a slight difference in the ranking of priority actions between experience owners and fresh starters. Originality/value: This study innovated a new co-creation methodology for remotely engaging stakeholders of the women's entrepreneurial ecosystem, which is grounded in evidence and provides a replicable model for performing action-oriented research. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

14.
World Journal of Engineering ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1304054

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This purpose of this study is to perfrom the analysis of COVID-19 with the help of blood samples. The blood samples used in the study consist of more than 100 features. So to process high dimensional data, feature reduction has been performed by using the genetic algorithm. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, the authors will implement the genetic algorithm for the prediction of COVID-19 from the blood test sample. The sample contains records of around 5,644 patients with 111 attributes. The genetic algorithm such as relief with ant colony optimization algorithm will be used for dimensionality reduction approach. Findings: The implementation of this study is done through python programming language and the performance evaluation of the model is done through various parameters such as accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under curve (AUC). Originality/value: The implemented model has achieved an accuracy of 98.7%, sensitivity of 96.76%, specificity of 98.80% and AUC of 92%. The results have shown that the implemented algorithm has performed better than other states of the art algorithms. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

15.
Hematological Oncology ; 39(SUPPL 2):307, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1283735

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mature T and NK-cell lymphomas represent a heterogeneous group of lymphoid disorders (29 subtypes according to the 2016 WHO classification) arising from mature T cells of post-thymic origin with different morphological characteristics, phenotypes, and clinical presentation. Following the success of the T Cell Project (TCP), which allowed the analysis of more than 1,500 cases of peripheral T-Cell lymphomas (PTCLs) collected prospectively in 18 Countries, in 2018 the TCP 2.0 was launched. Here we report the global distribution of PTCLs, from the cases registered so far based on the locally established histological diagnosis. Methods: The TCP2.0 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03964480) is a prospective, international, observational study which adapts to changes made in the new WHO classification. Results: Since the beginning of the study (October 2018), 648 patients with newly diagnosed PTCL were registered by 75 active centers across 14 countries. Of these data, 594 patients have been validated by the centralized trial office. Overall, PTCL-NOS, Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) ALK-negative, and Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), represent the most frequent subtypes, representing 31.3%, 18,9% and 13,5% of cases, respectively. As reported in Table 1, PTCL-NOS represents the most frequent subtype worldwide, whereas Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma was more frequent in Brazil, AITL and ALCL ALK-negative in Australia/ India, and ALCL ALK-positive in North America and Europe. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type was relatively frequent in Brazil and quite rare in the other Latin America Countries. Finally, many sub-types represent less than 5% of cases in all geographic areas. Conclusions: The TCP2.0 continues to recruit very well, despite the difficulties linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, and may represent a useful resource for the prospective study of this group of rare lymphomas.

16.
Indian Journal of Medical and Paediatric Oncology ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1258616

ABSTRACT

Objective Indian data on cancer patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and its outcome are limited. Infectivity and outcome among cancer patients staying in large congregations are not known. We conducted this study to address this lacuna in literature. Methods This was a retrospective-prospective, observational study of hospitalized cancer patients with proven COVID-19 infection, conducted at tertiary care hospital in New Delhi after ethical approval. We analyzed clinical, laboratorial parameters, and outcomes in these patients. Results All 32 admitted male patients became COVID-19 positive and 10 (31%) patients were symptomatic. Median age was 37.5 years (range: 16-64). Sixteen health-care workers (HCWs) were working in the cancer ward (paramedical staff: 4, nurses: 6, residents: 4, and consultants: 2). Among HCWs, two nursing staff and three paramedical staff contracted asymptomatic COVID-19. Eighteen (56%) and 14 (44%) patients were on curative and palliative treatment, respectively. Leukopenia (total leukocyte count <4,000/μL) was seen in 37.5% of cases. Grades 4, 3, 2, and 1 neutropenia were present in 12.5% of patents. Two (6.25%) patients had features of critical COVID-19. Eight (25%) patients received treatment with hydroxychloroquine + azithromycin. Five patients died. Three patients had features of progressive disease with poor performance status. One critical COVID patient survived and one succumbed to COVID-19. Patients shared a common dining room, sanitation area. Conclusion Seventy percent of cancer patients were asymptomatic. Cancer patients living in congregation areas are susceptible to COVID-19 with 3% mortality rate. Recent chemotherapy and associated cytopenias may not increase the risk in cancer patients with COVID-19 treated with curative intent. Palliative intended patients are at increased risk of death. N-95, personal protective equipment, and adherence to infection control measures should be encouraged. © 2021. Indian Society of Medical and Paediatric Oncology.

17.
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion ; 36(1 SUPPL):S121-S122, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1092839

ABSTRACT

Aims & Objectives: We conducted a clinical audit of patients with hematological disorders and SARS-CoV2 infection. Patients/Materials & Methods: A prospective registry was established in April 2020 for patients from the department of clinical hematology and HCT who were diagnosed to be positive for SARSCoV2 by PCR test. Out patients creening was symptom/contact-exposure driven, and in patients creening was symptomaticorpreemptive. This study is a part of ASHCOVID19 International collaborative and an interim analysis of the institute registry data from April 15, 2020 to October 7, 2020. Results: 1201 new patients were registered and 9539 patient-visits were recorded in the out patient service of the department during this period. 91 (0.08%) patients tested positive for SARS-CoV2. Baseline characteristics of the patients are listed in Table 1. 56 (61.5%) patients needed hospitalization. The median absolute neutrophil count was 3700/cu.mm, while the median absolute lymphocyte count 900/cu.mm. Inflammatory markers (n = 21):median D-dimer was 2845 ng/ml (243-140643) and median CRP level was 14 mg/dl (3.3- 34). Therapy directed against SARS-CoV2 included, Azithromycin (n = 52,60.4%), Dexamethasone (27 patients,29.7%), Remdesivir (n = 10,11.1%) and doxycycline (n = 9,9.9%). 2(2.2%) patients received tocilizumab and 1 patient (1.1%) received convalescent plasma. On univariate analysis, none of the therapies seemed to affect outcomes. The SARS-CoV2 infection mortality was 15% (14/91). 2 patients died due to non-COVID related causes [tumor lysis syndrome (n = 1), leukocytostasis with CVA (n = 1)]. 7/45(15.5%) receiving anti-B-lymphocyte directed therapy died as compared to 7/46(15.21%) not receiving Anti-B-cell therapies. Patients with low grade B-NHL (5/16,31.25%) had the highest mortality rate followed by high grade B-NHL (7/23,30.4%).There was a trend to higher mortality in patients>50 years (12/45,26.6% in those[=50 years age as compared to 4/30,13.33% in those<50 years age). With data available until the date of censoring, most patients were diagnosed in August (n = 32,35.2%) with numbers tailing off in September (n = 20, 22%). Discussion & Conclusion: In our subset of patients with hematological disorders, SARS-COV2 infectivity was found to be low, hospitalization rate was moderate, and mortality was high and commoner in patients>50 yr and a B-cell lymphoma diagnosis. A more aggressive screening approach will potentially improveoutcomes.

18.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 26(3 SUPPL):63-64, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1067133

ABSTRACT

Background: The UK MS Register captures longitudinal data directly from people with MS (pwMS) as patient reported outcome measures but also from NHS Trusts via electronic Case Return Form (eCRF). As part of our response to the COVID19 pandemic we designed an anonymised clinical capture instrument to allow clinicians from non affiliated NHS hospitals capture important clinical data on incident cases. Here we outline our current clinicians reported findings from these collected data. Objectives: Report on patients with Multiple Sclerosis and COVID as reported by UK National Health Service MS clinicians to the UK MS Register Methods: Data were captured using the RedCap platform to design forms and were stored on secured databases at Swansea University Medical School. The URL for data capture was shared on social media and via clinician groups to encourage as many clinicians as possible to report hospitalised pwMS and confirmed COVID. Variables included: Age, Gender, MS Type, Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS), Disease Modifying Therapy (DMT) Details, COVID clinical treatment and outcomes. Results: Between 27/03/2020 and 14/07/2020, 93 patients with COVID were reported. Their mean Age was 53.38 (±14.2) and median EDSS 6.0. Of these 11 patients died with mean Age 63.7(±10.9). Median EDSS 8.0. Multivariate regression showed increased EDSS score to be the most significant factor for mortality (P <0.01) with the other variables (age, gender, disease type, DMT,) not influencing mortality. All the patients that died had progressive MS and only one was on a DMT. Conclusions: Here we present the UK PwMS, with laboratory confirmed COVID19 as reported by hospital clinicians. We found increased disability rather than age or MS type to be the only predictor of mortality. These results are strikingly different from the patients reported UK MS register COVID study (separate abstract) that had a much milder COVID illness that led to hospitalisation in only 3% of the cases.

19.
Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India): Series B ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1064644

ABSTRACT

Learning through Internet is becoming necessary for easy understanding of complex problems and knowledge sharing process. A new pedagogy is being demanded in the teaching process which includes digital platforms for better understanding. Moreover, software and hardware have been developed for ease of access to the materials and smooth learning. The COVID-19 pandemic brought various challenges in livelihood of human life. One of these challenges is teaching and learning process. Although teaching and learning include usage of digital media, there exist a need to digitalize the education system. In this regard, this study aimed to analyse the drivers of digital learning in COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 scenario. Sixteen drivers pertaining to digital learning have been considered for analysis. Interpretive structural modelling (ISM) approach has been used to analyse drivers of digital learning and to develop a structural model. The developed structural model was further validated using MICMAC analysis. Results reveal that low Internet cost and government supports are the two prominent drivers of digital learning. The implementation of developed ISM model would create smooth learning environment in COVID-19 and motivates for innovation in post-COVID-19 scenario. © 2021, The Institution of Engineers (India).

20.
Journal of Engineering Education Transformations ; 34(Special Issue):566-573, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1058664

ABSTRACT

The current COVID situation has put the entire education system in a state of shock and has forced the educators to adopt online teaching at a rapid pace. Faculty and students are working hard to adapt to new and continuously evolving methods of and to make it as close to a classroom experience as possible. Hence an analysis of student satisfaction for a specific course is planned through analytical means in this article. Data is collected using the distance education learning environments survey as it closely resembles the current online teaching scenario. The survey captures the relationship between student satisfaction and parameters such as faculty support, student interaction, active learning, student autonomy, authentic learning and personal relevance. The survey is designed as a five point Likert type set of choices for each of the parameters. The participants of this study were 150 undergraduate students of Second year of Kalasalingam Academy of Research and Education who were taking a common course in Mathematics. From the survey results, correlation analysis and descriptive statistics is conducted to understand the parameters which considerably affect the student satisfaction considerably. The analysis shows that faculty interaction and student interaction were the most significant factors affecting student satisfaction. These results can directly act as an input to the institutions which are finding the aspect of online classes challenging and will motivate them to address the key issues directly to improve their student satisfaction. © 2021, Rajarambapu Institute Of Technology. All rights reserved.

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