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1.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 86(1): 21-42, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736733

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated neurological, mental health disorders, and neurocognitive issues. However, there is a lack of inexpensive and efficient brain evaluation and screening systems. As a result, a considerable fraction of patients with neurocognitive or psychobehavioral predicaments either do not get timely diagnosed or fail to receive personalized treatment plans. This is especially true in the elderly populations, wherein only 16% of seniors say they receive regular cognitive evaluations. Therefore, there is a great need for development of an optimized clinical brain screening workflow methodology like what is already in existence for prostate and breast exams. Such a methodology should be designed to facilitate objective early detection and cost-effective treatment of such disorders. In this paper we have reviewed the existing clinical protocols, recent technological advances and suggested reliable clinical workflows for brain screening. Such protocols range from questionnaires and smartphone apps to multi-modality brain mapping and advanced imaging where applicable. To that end, the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) proposes the Brain, Spine and Mental Health Screening (NEUROSCREEN) as a multi-faceted approach. Beside other assessment tools, NEUROSCREEN employs smartphone guided cognitive assessments and quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) as well as potential genetic testing for cognitive decline risk as inexpensive and effective screening tools to facilitate objective diagnosis, monitor disease progression, and guide personalized treatment interventions. Operationalizing NEUROSCREEN is expected to result in reduced healthcare costs and improving quality of life at national and later, global scales.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain Mapping , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Male , Quality of Life
2.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1563-1601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468319

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders significantly impact the world's economy due to their often chronic and life-threatening nature afflicting individuals which, in turn, creates a global disease burden. The Group of Twenty (G20) member nations, which represent the largest economies globally, should come together to formulate a plan on how to overcome this burden. The Neuroscience-20 (N20) initiative of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) is at the vanguard of this global collaboration to comprehensively raise awareness about brain, spine, and mental disorders worldwide. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the various brain initiatives worldwide and highlight the need for cooperation and recommend ways to bring down costs associated with the discovery and treatment of neurological disorders. Our systematic search revealed that the cost of neurological and psychiatric disorders to the world economy by 2030 is roughly $16T. The cost to the economy of the United States is $1.5T annually and growing given the impact of COVID-19. We also discovered there is a shortfall of effective collaboration between nations and a lack of resources in developing countries. Current statistical analyses on the cost of neurological disorders to the world economy strongly suggest that there is a great need for investment in neurotechnology and innovation or fast-tracking therapeutics and diagnostics to curb these costs. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, SBMT, through this paper, intends to showcase the importance of worldwide collaborations to reduce the population's economic and health burden, specifically regarding neurological/brain, spine, and mental disorders.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , International Cooperation , Mental Disorders , Nervous System Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Burden of Disease/organization & administration , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Global Health/economics , Global Health/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/economics , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Nervous System Diseases/economics , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurosciences/methods , Neurosciences/trends , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int Ophthalmol ; 41(3): 1141-1147, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002117

ABSTRACT

AIM: The current world has changed in all shapes since the emergence of the novel coronavirus (nCoV-2) also known as COVID-19. Among the extra-pulmonary manifestations of nCoV-2, ophthalmic symptoms have less been systematically studied. The so far existing body of evidence indicates that nCoV-2 has the potential to affect both anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. Albeit, the exact mechanisms which underlie ophthalmic manifestations of nCoV-2 are yet to be elucidated. METHODS: The present brief review is an attempt to put together and highlight the significant yet limited number of studies which have spotlighted ophthalmic issues in nCoV-2 patients using a systematic literature search strategy. RESULTS: All case series or reports (including both published and preprint articles) which described ocular manifestations of patients with COVID-19 and/or documented testing of SARS-COV-2 in ocular secretions via various sampling or detection methods were sought to be included. CONCLUSION: The ophthalmic presentations in SARS-COV-2 are often found to be salient. Raising awareness in this respect may help defining evidencebased protective measures in today's practice of ophthalmology and allied disciplines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/virology , Eye Infections, Viral/virology , Humans
4.
Trials ; 21(1): 1023, 2020 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of mental health disorders is increasing globally, and the prevalence of COVID-19 has made it worse. Evidence has indicated a major mental health burden and elevated anxiety associated with the new coronavirus outbreak in the general population. This study aims to evaluate an evidence-based web application (Naranj) for stress management among Iranian college students. METHODS AND DESIGN: This study aims to present a protocol related to a randomized controlled trial among Iranian college students. The study will be conducted on 100 students from two colleges of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Iran. The participants will be randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups. The intervention group participants will be provided with a web application, whereas the control group ones will be provided with an app unrelated to stress management. The primary outcome for this study will be the Perceived Stress Scale, and the two groups will be compared with respect to stress level and sleep quality. DISCUSSION: A web application will be developed according to psychological theories and will be scientifically approved for managing college students' stress and improving their sleep quality during the COVID-19 outbreak. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT20160427027647N2 . Registered on 14 May 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet-Based Intervention , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Students/psychology , Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , Adult , Breathing Exercises , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Iran , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Relaxation Therapy , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Treatment Outcome , Universities , Young Adult
5.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 585893, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940209

ABSTRACT

In today's ever-growing concerns about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, many experience sleep insufficiencies, such as difficulty falling or staying asleep, sleep-related behavioral symptoms, and out-of-phase circadian rhythmicity despite the lack of history of earlier such symptoms. Meanwhile, the disruption in sleep bioparameters is experienced more in people with a history of sleep disorders. The behavioral sleep disorders in the current situations are prevalent given the today's amount of anxiety everyone is feeling about COVID-19. On the other hand, evidences indicated that the cross-link between impaired sleep efficiency and disrupted innate immunity makes people susceptible to viral infections. The present brief review highlights the links between psychosocial stress, sleep insufficiency, and susceptibility to viral infections in relevance to COVID-19 situation. The stress management measures, including addressing sleep-related disorders and sleep hygiene, will have a notable impact by harnessing immune response and thus reducing the susceptibility to viral infections.

6.
J Clin Med ; 9(8)2020 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717748

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has catastrophically affected the world's panoramic view of human well-being in terms of healthcare and management. With the increase in the number of cases worldwide, neurological symptoms and psychological illnesses from COVID-19 have increasingly upsurged. Mental health illness and affective disorders, including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, phobia, and panic disorders, are highly impacted due to social distress. The COVID-19 pandemic not only affected people with pre-existing mental and affective illnesses, but also healthy individuals with anxiety, worrying, and panic symptoms, and fear conditioning. In addditon, the novel coronavirus is known to impact the central nervous system in the brain, resulting in severe and certain long-lasting neurological issues. Owing to the significance of neurological and psychological events, the present perspective has been an attempt to disseminate the impact of COVID-19 on neural injury through inflammation, and its interrelation with psychological symptoms. In this current review, we synthesize the literature to highlight the critical associations between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the nervous system, and mental health illness, and discuss potential mechanisms of neural injury through psycho-neuroimmunity.

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