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1.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 669397, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34513861

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular events (CVEs) are the first cause of death in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Depression is a recognized risk factor in cardiovascular events and is frequently associated with PsA. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) is a widely used method for assessing endothelial dysfunction, a parameter with strong prognostic implications for CVEs. The study aims to explore the relationship between FMD, depressive symptoms and serum cytokines in a cohort of patients with PsA. Patients and Methods: FMD was assessed in 50 consecutive PsA patients aged between 30 and 75 years without known cerebrovascular and coronary heart disease or diabetes. Depressive symptoms were reported using the related subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HDS). Disease features, activity indexes, and adjusted Framingham risk score (aFRS) were calculated. Serum level of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-17A were also assessed. Results: In PsA patients (age 50.7 ± 10.2 years, male 42%, disease duration 5.9 ± 3.3 years, Disease Activity in PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) score 14.0 ± 9.4) FMD inversely correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms according to HDS (ρ = -0.339, p = 0.016), age (ρ = -0.507, p = 0.001), aFRS (rs = -0.453, p < 0.001), duration of PsA (ρ = -0.507, p = 0.001), intensity of pain (ρ = -0.507, p = 0.001), and DAPSA (ρ = -0.507, p = 0.001). No statistically significant correlation was found between FMD or HDS and serum cytokines concentrations. HDS predicted FMD in a model adjusted for age, aFRS, PsA duration, and pain intensity (ß = -0.271, p = 0.008), with depressive symptoms contributing directly to 6.4% of the variance. Conclusions: Depressive symptoms correlate with endothelial dysfunction with an exposure-response pattern in our cohort of PsA patients.

4.
EClinicalMedicine ; 27: 100553, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33043284

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interleukin-6 signal blockade showed preliminary beneficial effects in treating inflammatory response against SARS-CoV-2 leading to severe respiratory distress. Herein we describe the outcomes of off-label intravenous use of Sarilumab in severe SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia. METHODS: 53 patients with SARS-CoV-2 severe pneumonia received intravenous Sarilumab; pulmonary function improvement or Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission rate in medical wards, live discharge rate in ICU treated patients and safety profile were recorded. Sarilumab 400 mg was administered intravenously on day 1, with eventual additional infusion based on clinical judgement, and patients were followed for at least 14 days, unless previously discharged or dead. FINDINGS: Of the 53 SARS-CoV-2pos patients receiving Sarilumab, 39(73·6%) were treated in medical wards [66·7% with a single infusion; median PaO2/FiO2:146(IQR:120-212)] while 14(26·4%) in ICU [92·6% with a second infusion; median PaO2/FiO2: 112(IQR:100-141.5)].Within the medical wards, 7(17·9%) required ICU admission, 4 of whom were re-admitted to the ward within 5-8 days. At 19 days median follow-up, 89·7% of medical inpatients significantly improved (46·1% after 24 h, 61·5% after 3 days), 70·6% were discharged from the hospital and 85·7% no longer needed oxygen therapy. Within patients receiving Sarilumab in ICU, 64·2% were discharged from ICU to the ward and 35·8% were still alive at the last follow-up. Overall mortality rate was 5·7%. INTERPRETATION: IL-6R inhibition appears to be a potential treatment strategy for severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and intravenous Sarilumab seems a promising treatment approach showing, in the short term, an important clinical outcome and good safety.

5.
Clin Rheumatol ; 40(5): 1893-1902, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009969

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Depression is commonly associated with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but its risk factors in these patients are largely unrecognized. Pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of PsA have been associated with depression in patients without autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to establish whether PsA patients with and without depressive symptoms differed for general or clinical variables and serum cytokines milieu. METHODS: One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with PsA were screened for depressive symptoms with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). Patients with and without depressive symptoms were compared according to the prevalence of general risk factors for depression, comorbidities, PsA features and serum IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-17A. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patient (38.7%) had a depressive mood. Depressive symptoms were associated with female sex (p = 0.03) and current smoking (p = 0.05). Patients with and without depressive symptoms did not differ for general risk factors for depression and comorbidities. Depressed patients had more frequently psoriatic nail disease (p = 0.02) and significant physical disability (HAQ-DI ≥ 0.5) (p < 0.01) and were more frequently in moderate or high disease activity according to DAPSA score (p = 0.01). Depressed patients had higher serum IL-6 (p < 0.01) and comparable serum IL-17A and TNF-α. A cutoff of 2.27 pg/ml of serum IL-6 had the best ability to predict an HADS-D ≥ 8 (AUC 0.666 ± 0.044; p < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that serum IL-6 ≥ 2.27 pg/ml was independently associated with depressive symptoms (OR 3.5; CI 1.6-7.8; p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Higher serum Il-6 is associated with depressive symptoms. This association suggests a direct role of systemic inflammation in the modulation of mood in PsA patients. Key Points • High PsA disease activity and physical disability are associated with depression. • Higher serum levels of IL-6 are independently associated with depression in PsA. • IL-6 might play a direct role in the development of depression in PsA patients.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Depression , Arthritis, Psoriatic/complications , Cytokines , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
6.
Microvasc Res ; 133: 104071, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32949574

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Increasing evidence points to endothelial dysfunction as a key pathophysiological factor in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). No specific methods have been identified to predict, detect and quantify the microvascular alterations during COVID-19. Our aim was to assess microvasculature through nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We performed NVC in patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia. Elementary alterations were reported for each finger according to a semi-quantitative score. Capillary density, number of enlarged and giant capillaries, number of micro-hemorrhages and micro-thrombosis (NEMO score) were registered. RESULTS: We enrolled 82 patients (mean age 58.8 ± 13.2 years, male 68.3%) of whom 28 during the hospitalization and 54 after recovery and hospital discharge. At NVC examination we found abnormalities classifiable as non-specific pattern in 53 patients (64.6%). Common abnormalities were pericapillary edema (80.5%), enlarged capillaries (61.0%), sludge flow (53.7%), meandering capillaries and reduced capillary density (50.0%). No pictures suggestive of scleroderma pattern have been observed. Acute COVID-19 patients, compared to recovered patients, showed a higher prevalence of hemosiderin deposits as a result of micro-hemorrhages (P = .027) and micro-thrombosis (P < .016), sludge flow (P = .001), and pericapillary edema (P < .001), while recovered patients showed a higher prevalence of enlarged capillaries (P < .001), loss of capillaries (P = .002), meandering capillaries (P < .001), and empty dermal papillae (P = .006). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients present microvascular abnormalities at NVC. Currently ill and recovered subjects are characterized by a different distribution of elementary capillaroscopic alterations, resembling acute and post-acute microvascular damage. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical relevance of NVC in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Capillaries/pathology , Microscopic Angioscopy , Nails/blood supply , Vascular Diseases/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Vascular Diseases/etiology
8.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 10(9)2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32887318

ABSTRACT

Multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion is the gold standard in the management of interstitial lung disease (ILD). The rheumatologist is not routinely involved in MDT, even if up to 20% of ILD are related to systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). The study aims to assess the agreement and its variation over time between rheumatologists and pulmonologists in the screening of SARD and between rheumatologists and an MDT extended to rheumatologists (eMDT) in evaluating the progression of SARD. We computed the agreement between the pulmonologist and rheumatologist in the identification of red flags for SARDs of 81 ILD cases and between the rheumatologist alone and eMDT in the confirmation of 70 suspected SARD-ILD progressions. The agreement between rheumatologists and pulmonologists was moderate for the detection of autoimmunity test positivity (κ = 0.475, p < 0.001) and family history of SARD (κ = 0.491, p < 0.001) and fair for the identification of extrapulmonary symptoms (κ = 0.225, p = 0.064) or routine laboratory abnormalities consistent with SARD. The average agreement between the rheumatologist and eMDT in the identification of ILD progression was moderate (κ = 0.436, p < 0.001). The class of agreement improved from the first to the third semester. The average agreement with the rheumatologist ranged from fair to moderate, suggesting that a shared evaluation of SARD-ILD in eMDT could improve the diagnostic work-up and the evaluation of ILD progression.

9.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 38 Suppl 125(3): 73-84, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32865168

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare multi-organ disorder with a prominent gastrointestinal (GI) involvement. Altered gut microbiota is now considered a pivotal factor associated with the development of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. We performed a 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-sequencing analysis of fecal microbiota in a cohort of SSc patients and matched healthy controls (HCs), with the aim to obtain some hints about a possible role of dysbiosis in the onset, progression, and severity of the disease. METHODS: We analysed stool samples from 63 SSc patients with different disease duration, phenotype, and nutritional status and from 17 HCs through 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-sequencing. RESULTS: Microbial richness was lower for patients with long-standing disease. A similar observation was made for patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dsSSc) compared to those with limited variant (lcSSc) and for patients who reported a recent weight loss. Consistent with previous reports, we noted a deviation of the intestinal microbial composition in patients with SSc compared to HCs, with a greater expression of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus and a depletion of Sutterella. Nutritional status, assessed using BMI as a surrogate, appeared to have a marked impact on the gut microbiota, with overweight patients showing lower richness compared both to underweight and normal-BMI patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings expand the current knowledge of gut microbiota in SSc and could be useful to identify patients who would most benefit from treatments aimed at restoring the eu-biosis.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Scleroderma, Systemic , Dysbiosis , Feces , Humans , Nutritional Status , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
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