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1.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36190965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms (DVBFAs) have poor natural history when left untreated and high morbimortality when treated with microsurgery. Flow diversion (FD) with dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is feasible but carries high risk of perforator occlusion and progression of brainstem compression. Elaborate antithrombotic strategies are needed to preserve perforator patency while vessel remodeling occurs. We compared triple therapy (TT (DAPT plus oral anticoagulation)) and DAPT alone in patients with DVBFAs treated with FD. METHODS: Retrospective comparison of DAPT and TT in patients with DVBFAs treated with FD at eight US centers. RESULTS: The groups (DAPT=13, TT=14) were similar in age, sex, clinical presentation, baseline disability, and aneurysm characteristics. Radial access use was significantly higher in the TT group (71.4% vs 15.3%; P=0.006). Median number of flow diverters and adjunctive coiling use were non-different between groups. Acute ischemic stroke rate during the oral anticoagulation period was lower in the TT group than the DAPT group (7.1% vs 30.8%; P=0.167). Modified Rankin Scale score decline was significantly lower in the TT group (7.1% vs 69.2%; P=0.001). Overall rates of hemorrhagic complications (TT, 28.6% vs DAPT, 7.7%; P=0.162) and complete occlusion (TT, 25% vs DAPT, 54.4%; P=0.213) were non-different between the groups. Rate of moderate-to-severe disability at last follow-up was significantly lower in the TT group (21.4% vs 76.9%; P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with DVBFAs treated with FD in the TT group had fewer ischemic strokes, less symptom progression, and overall better outcomes at last follow-up than similar patients in the DAPT group.

2.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32657330

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Neurosurgery ; 87(2): E239-E240, 2020 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32379310
5.
World Neurosurg ; 130: e272-e293, 2019 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31207370

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze a consecutive series of patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms who needed an adjunctive cerebral revascularization procedure to achieve aneurysm occlusion with preservation of flow through all MCA branches. METHODS: A total of 42 patients with 43 MCA aneurysms underwent 52 bypass procedures over 13 years. The location of the aneurysm were M1 trunk, M1 bifurcation, M2 and beyond. The bypasses performed included intracranial bypasses (resection with end to end anastomosis, end to side implantation, side to side anastomosis, and short interposition graft), extraintracranial bypasses (superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery anastomosis, and radial artery bypass graft, or saphenous vein graft), double bypasses, Y-grafts, and combined techniques. RESULTS: Forty-two of 43 aneurysms (98%) had patent bypasses at long-term follow-up. All 43 aneurysms were completely occluded at last follow-up. Six patients (14%) developed strokes related to the surgical treatment. At last follow-up, 36 patients had a modified Rankin score of 0-2, 5 patients had modified Rankin score 3-5, and 1 died. In this series, 31 (73.8%) patients improved, 8 (19%) patients had same functional status, and 3 (7.2%) patients deteriorated, including 1 patient who expired due to sepsis. The mean clinical follow-up duration was 39.3 months (0.4-124 months) and the mean radiological follow-up was 37 months (0.4-134 months). CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral revascularization is an important adjunct for treating MCA aneurysms and can be done safely. The article provides the insights we gained by rising through the learning curve.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Revascularization/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Vascular Surgical Procedures/methods , Adult , Aged , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/surgery , Cerebral Revascularization/trends , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Middle Cerebral Artery/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Treatment Outcome , Vascular Surgical Procedures/trends
6.
Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) ; 12(3): 250-259, 2016 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29506112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute basilar artery occlusion causes devastating strokes that carry high mortality and morbidity. OBJECTIVE: To report the outcomes of mechanical thrombectomy in the posterior circulation with a focus on safety and efficacy of stent retrievers. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our endovascular database for all patients treated with stent retrievers for posterior circulation stroke between June 2012 and June 2014. Twelve patients were identified. The following data were analyzed: thrombus location, previous stroke or transient ischemic attack, thrombus etiology, comorbidities, time from presentation to initiation of endovascular treatment, time from start of angiography to revascularization, and whether intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was administered pre-thrombectomy. Outcome was considered poor when modified Rankin Scale score was >2. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 63.42 years (median, 64.5; range, 28-83 years); 7 were women. Successful recanalization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction grade 2b or 3) was achieved in 11 of 12 patients (91.7%). Mean discharge modified Rankin Scale score was 2.3 (median, 2.0; standard deviation 1.96; range, 0-6), with a favorable discharge outcome in 9 of 12 (75%) patients. Two patients died as inpatients. Mean follow-up modified Rankin Scale score was 1.4 (median, 1.00; standard deviation 1.075; range, 0-4). Good outcome was achieved in 9 of 10 (90%) patients at last follow-up (mean follow-up duration, 132.42 days [median, 90.50; standard deviation 80.2; range, 8-378 days]). CONCLUSION: Our single-institution study has shown that good clinical outcomes and successful recanalization with acceptable mortality can be achieved with current stent retrievers.

7.
Neurosurg Clin N Am ; 28(3): 375-388, 2017 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28600012

ABSTRACT

Flow diversion after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the last treatment option for aneurysm occlusion when other methods of aneurysm treatment cannot be used because of the need for dual antiplatelet therapy. The authors' general protocol for treatment selection after aneurysmal SAH is provided to share with readers our approach to securing the aneurysm before embarking flow diversion for primary treatment or delayed adjunctive treatment to primary coiling. The authors' experience with flow diversion after aneurysmal SAH, review of pertinent literature, and the future of flow diversion after aneurysmal SAH are discussed.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/surgery , Aged , Endovascular Procedures/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Regional Blood Flow , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Young Adult
8.
Neurosurgery ; 82(4): 497-505, 2018 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28541411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The benefit of surgical treatment of ruptured aneurysms is well established. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether ultra-early ruptured aneurysm treatment leads to not only improved outcomes but also reduced hospitalization cost. METHODS: Using 2008-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample data, we analyzed demographic, clinical, and hospital factors for nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients who were "directly" admitted to the treating hospital where they underwent intervention (clipping/coiling). Patients treated on the day of admission (day 0) formed the ultra-early cohort; others formed the deferred treatment cohort. All Patient Refined Diagnosis-Related Groups were also included in regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 17 412 patients were directly admitted to a hospital following nontraumatic SAH where they underwent intervention (clipping/coiling). Mean patient age was 53.87 yr (median 53.00, standard deviation 14.247); 68.3% were women (n = 11 893). A total of 6338 (36.4%) patients underwent treatment on the day of admission (ultra-early). Patients who underwent treatment on day 0 had significantly more routine discharge dispositions than those treated >admission day 0 (P < .0001). In regression analysis, treatment on day 0 was protective against other than routine discharge disposition outcome (P < .0001; odds ratio 0.657; 95% confidence interval 0.614-0.838). Total cost incurred by hospitals was $4.36 billion. Mean cost of hospital charges in the ultra-early cohort was $239 126.05, which was significantly lower than that for the cohort treated >day 0 ($272 989.56, P < .001), Mann-Whitney U-test). Performance of an intervention on admission day 0 was protective against higher hospitalization cost (P < .0001; odds ratio 0.811; 95% confidence interval 0.732-0.899). CONCLUSION: Ultra-early treatment of ruptured aneurysms is significantly associated with better discharge disposition and decreased hospitalization cost.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Embolization, Therapeutic/economics , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/economics , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Costs , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Neurosurg ; 125(1): 111-9, 2016 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26654175

ABSTRACT

OBJECT Pessimism exists regarding flow diversion for posterior circulation aneurysms because of reports of perforator territory infarcts and delayed ruptures. The authors report the results of patients who underwent Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) flow diversion using novel strategies for treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms, and compare these results with those from previously reported series. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of data from consecutive patients with fusiform vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms treated with the PED. RESULTS This review resulted in the identification of 12 such patients (mean [± SD] age 55.1 ± 14.1 years). Eleven patients had symptoms; 1 had a dissecting aneurysm identified on imaging for neck pain. The average aneurysm size was 13.25 ± 4.5 mm. None of the aneurysms were ruptured or previously treated. The average clinical follow-up duration was 22.1 ± 10.7 months and radiological follow-up was 14.5 ± 11.1 months from the index PED treatment. One patient suffered a perforator stroke and had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 4 at last follow-up. Another patient had a retained stent pusher requiring retrieval via surgical cut-down but recovered to an mRS score of 0 at last follow-up. Eleven (91.7%) of 12 patients recovered to an mRS score of 0 or 1. Two patients had aneurysmal remnants at 7 and 10 months, respectively, after the index PED, which were retreated with PEDs. At last follow-up, all 12 aneurysms were occluded and PEDs were patent. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months from the index PED treatment; no patient experienced delayed hemorrhage, stroke, or in-stent stenosis. CONCLUSIONS Flow diversion with selective adjunctive techniques is evolving to become a safer treatment option for posterior circulation aneurysms. This is the longest clinical follow-up duration reported for a single-center experience of flow-diversion treatment of these aneurysms.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic , Endovascular Procedures , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Adult , Aged , Cerebral Angiography , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
11.
J Neurosurg ; 124(5): 1228-37, 2016 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26452123

ABSTRACT

OBJECT In this study, the authors used information provided in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to study the impact of transferring stroke patients from one facility to a center where they received some form of active stroke intervention (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, thrombectomy, or a combination of both therapies). METHODS Patient demographic characteristics and hospital factors obtained from the 2008-2010 acute stroke NIS data were analyzed. Discharge disposition, hospitalization cost, and mortality were the dependent variables studied. Univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Data analysis focused on the cohort of acute stroke patients who received some form of active intervention (55,913 of 1,311,511 patients in the NIS). RESULTS When overall outcome was considered, transferred patients had a significantly higher number of other-than-routine (OTR, i.e., other than discharge to home without home health care) discharge dispositions (p < 0.0001). In multivariate regression analysis including pertinent patient and hospital factors, transfer-in patients had significantly worse OTR discharge disposition (p < 0.0001, odds ratio [OR] 2.575, 95% CI 2.341-2.832). Mean hospitalization cost including an intervention was $70,325.11 for direct admissions and $97,546.92 for transferred patients. Transfer from another facility (p < 0.001, OR 1.677, 95% CI 1.548-1.817) was associated with higher hospitalization cost. CONCLUSIONS The study showed that hospital cost for acute stroke intervention is significantly higher for a transferred patient than for a direct admission. Moreover, the frequency of OTR discharge was significantly higher among transferred patients than direct admissions. Future strategies should focus on ways and means of transporting patients appropriately and directly to stroke centers.


Subject(s)
Hospital Costs , Hospitalization/economics , Patient Discharge/economics , Patient Transfer/economics , Stroke/economics , Stroke/therapy , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Cohort Studies , Combined Modality Therapy/economics , Costs and Cost Analysis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Plasminogen Inactivators/economics , Plasminogen Inactivators/therapeutic use , Stroke/mortality , Survival Analysis , Thrombectomy/economics , Thrombolytic Therapy/economics , United States , Young Adult
12.
Neurosurgery ; 77(4): 531-42; discussion 542-3, 2015 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26308641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Demographics and vascular anatomy may play an important role in predicting periprocedural complications in symptomatic patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS). OBJECTIVE: To predict factors associated with increased risk of complications in symptomatic patients undergoing CAS and to devise a CAS scoring system that predicts such complications in this patient population. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted that included patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis during a 3-year period. Demographics and anatomic characteristics were subsequently correlated with 30-day outcome measures. RESULTS: A total of 221 patients were included in the study. The cumulative rate of periprocedural complications was 7.2%, including stroke (3.2%), myocardial infarction (3.2%), and death (1.4%). Renal disease increased the risk of all complications. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥10 at presentation, difficult femoral access, and diseased calcified aortic arch increased the risk of stroke and all complications. Type III aortic arch correlated with increased risk of stroke. Pseudo-occlusion and concentric calcification of the carotid artery increased the risk of myocardial infarction, death, and all complications. Carotid tortuosity and anatomy hostile to the deployment of distal protection devices increased the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, death, and all complications. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CAS should be avoided in patients with multiple anatomic risk factors. High presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and renal disease also increase the complication risk. The CAS scoring system devised here is simple, reproducible, and clinically valuable in predicting complications risk in symptomatic patients undergoing CAS.


Subject(s)
Carotid Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Carotid Stenosis/surgery , Severity of Illness Index , Stents , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carotid Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Carotid Arteries/surgery , Carotid Stenosis/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Radiography , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Stents/adverse effects , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/etiology , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Vasc Interv Neurol ; 8(3): 50-5, 2015 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26301032

ABSTRACT

UNLABELLED: A 57-year-old woman with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 26 was found to have an acute left carotid occlusion with tandem left M1 thrombus within 1.5 hours of symptom onset. After no neurologic improvement following standard-dose intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), emergent neuroendovascular revascularization with carotid stenting and intracranial thrombectomy were performed under conscious sedation. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI)-3 flow restoration and symptom resolution were achieved postprocedure; however, complete carotid stent thrombosis was noted on final angiographic runs (25 minutes later), correlating with neurologic decline. Rapid administration of an intraarterial (IA) bolus dose of eptifibatide resulted in TIMI-3 flow restoration, with neurologic improvement. The patient was discharged three days postrevascularization on dual antiplatelet therapy with an NIHSS score of 1. Intraarterial (IA) eptifibatide can be an effective option for acute stent occlusion during emergent neuroendovascular revascularization after IV rtPA administration. ABBREVIATIONS: CLEARCombined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and RtPACTcomputed tomographicFrFrenchGPglycoproteinIAintraarterialICAinternal carotid arteryIVintravenousMCAmiddle cerebral arteryNIHSSNational Institutes of Health Stroke ScalertPArecombinant tissue plasminogen activatorTIMIthrombolysis in myocardial infarction.

14.
J Vasc Interv Neurol ; 8(3): 62-7, 2015 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26301034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The preliminary results of a prospective consecutive series of 20 patients who underwent Enterprise-assisted recanalization for acute ischemic stroke were recently reported. Recanalization to thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) grade 2 (n = 6) or 3 (n = 12) flow was achieved in 18 patients (90% revascularization rate). Good outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score of ≤2) was obtained in 10 patients (50%) at 30 days. Here, we report the 2-year clinical follow-up data for patients enrolled in that prospective study. METHODS: Study patients were scheduled for examinations 2 years postprocedure at which time mRS and Barthel indices were obtained. RESULTS: Among 12 survivors at 2 years, 11 of the 20 (55%) study patients improved to mRS score ≤2 and 1 (5%) patient was disabled with an mRS 4. Of the 11 patients with mRS 0-2 scores, 10 patients had a Barthel index of 100, and the 11th had a Barthel index of 95. One patient improved from mRS 3 to 2 during the interval between the 6- and 12-month postintervention evaluations after intervention. Eight of 13 (62%) survivors underwent follow-up imaging at 6 months without evidence of instent stenosis or thrombosis. CONCLUSION: At 2 years of follow-up, improvement in quality of life after acute stroke intervention was sustained; and 11 of 12 (92%) survivors had an excellent functional outcome. Improvement in functional status can occur even up to 1 year after stroke intervention. These results 2 years after acute stroke intervention demonstrate sustained benefit from acute intervention. ABBREVIATIONS: AISacute ischemic strokeCTcomputed tomographicFDAFood and Drug AdministrationIVintravenousMCAmiddle cerebral arterymRSmodified Rankin ScaleNIHSSNational Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ScoreSWIFTSolitaire FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT)TIMIthrombolysis in myocardial infarctiontPAtissue plasminogen activatorTREVOThrombectomy REvascularization of large Vessel Occlusions.

15.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 9(e1): e10-e11, 2017 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26071385
16.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 19(6): 16, 2015 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26017708

ABSTRACT

Headaches from vascular causes need to be differentiated from primary headaches because a misdiagnosis may lead to dire consequences for the patient. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying patients with vascular headaches and identifying the nature of the pathologic disorder causing these headaches. In addition, the imaging findings guide the physician regarding the optimal treatment modality for these lesions. This review summarizes the nuances of differentiating patients with secondary headaches related to vascular disease and discusses pertinent neuroimaging studies.


Subject(s)
Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnosis , Headache Disorders, Secondary/diagnosis , Neuroimaging , Cerebral Angiography , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Headache Disorders, Secondary/etiology , Headache Disorders, Secondary/physiopathology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Predictive Value of Tests , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
17.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 8(3): 240-3, 2016 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25634902

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endovascular treatment of wake-up strokes (WUS) has been previously described, mostly with the use of pharmacological thrombolysis or first generation thrombectomy devices. OBJECTIVE: To describe outcomes of WUS treated with modern endovascular therapy since the Food and Drug Administration approval of stent retrievers, and to identify predictors of good clinical outcome in this population of stroke patients. METHODS: We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with WUS who underwent thrombectomy with stent retrievers Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) and Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA), or primary aspiration thrombectomy. We correlated favorable clinical outcomes with demographic, clinical, and technical characteristics. RESULTS: 52 patients were included in this study; 46 (88%) cases were treated with stent retrievers and 6 (12%) were treated with primary aspiration thrombectomy alone. Successful recanalization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) 2b/3) was achieved in 36 (69%) patients. Favorable clinical outcome at 3 months, defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2, was achieved in 25 (48%) patients. Duration of intervention <30 min and its success, defined as TICI 2b/3 recanalization, were strong predictors of favorable clinical outcome at 90 days (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that endovascular treatment of WUS with stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy is safe and effective.


Subject(s)
Device Removal/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Stents , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Wakefulness , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis
18.
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J ; 10(4): 214-9, 2014.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25624975

ABSTRACT

The worldwide prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is estimated to be between 5% and 10%, with some demographic variance. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysm results in devastating neurological outcomes, leaving the majority of victims dead or disabled. Surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms remained the definitive mode of treatment until Guglielmi detachable coils were introduced in the 1990s. This revolutionary innovation led to the recognition of neurointervention/neuroendovascular surgery as a bona fide option for intracranial aneurysms. Constant evolution of endovascular devices and techniques supported by several prospective randomized trials has catapulted the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms to its current status as the preferred treatment modality for most ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We are slowly transitioning from the era of coils to the era of flow diverters. Flow-diversion technology and techniques have revolutionized the treatment of wide-necked, giant, and fusiform aneurysms, where the results of microsurgery or conventional neuroendovascular strategies have traditionally been dismal. Although the Pipeline Embolization Device (ev3-Covidien, Irvine, CA) is the only flow-diversion device approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States, others are commercially available in Europe and South America, including the Silk (Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France), Flow-Redirection Endoluminal Device (FRED; MicroVention, Tustin, CA), Surpass (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI), and p64 (Phenox, Bochum, Germany). Improvements in technology and operator experience and the encouraging results of clinical trials have led to broader acceptance for the use of these devices in cerebral aneurysm management. Continued innovation and refinement of endovascular devices and techniques will inevitably improve technical success rates, reduce procedure-related complications, and broaden the endovascular therapeutic spectrum for varied aneurysm morphology.


Subject(s)
Endovascular Procedures , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures , Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Stents
19.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 157(3): 379-87, 2015 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25572632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tandem intracranial aneurysms are aneurysms located along a single intracranial vessel. Adjacent tandem aneurysms arise within the same vascular segment and their presence often suggests diffuse parent vessel anomaly. Endovascular management of these rare lesions has not been well studied. In this retrospective observational study, we describe our experience treating adjacent tandem intracranial aneurysms with endovascular embolization. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with these lesions who underwent endovascular treatment between 2008 and 2013. RESULTS: Thirteen patients (mean age 60.8 years; 12 women) with 28 adjacent tandem aneurysms were treated during the study timeframe. Aneurysms were located along the clinoidal, ophthalmic, and communicating segments of the internal carotid artery in 12 patients and at the basilar apex in one patient. Average size was 8.4 mm. Six patients (12 aneurysms) were treated by flow diversion via the Pipeline embolization device (PED) and seven (16 aneurysms) by stent-assisted coiling, with coils successfully placed in 11 aneurysms. Clinical follow-up was available for an average of 26.1 months; postprocedural angiography was performed for 12 patients. Complete occlusion was achieved in nine of ten (90 %) PED-treated aneurysms and eight of 11 (72.7 %) treated by stent-assisted coiling (p = 0.44). Two patients treated by stent-assisted coiling required re-coiling for aneurysm recanalization. Overall, modified Rankin scale scores were 0-1 for 12 patients and 3 for one patient. CONCLUSIONS: Adjacent tandem intracranial aneurysms can be safely and effectively treated by either stent-assisted coiling or flow diversion. We prefer PED flow diversion due to better parent vessel reconstruction and lower recanalization risk.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Stents , Adult , Aged , Embolization, Therapeutic/instrumentation , Endovascular Procedures/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
20.
Surg Neurol Int ; 5(Suppl 14): S497-500, 2014.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25525555

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Common causes of oculomotor nerve palsy are diabetes, aneurysmal compression, and uncal herniation. A lesser-known cause of third nerve dysfunction is ischemia, often due to carotid artery dissection. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 80-year-old man presented with an acute ischemic stroke with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of >20 from a high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection and a tandem ICA terminus embolic occlusion with extension of clot into the adjacent fetal posterior cerebral artery (PCA). We used a stentriever to perform selective PCA thrombectomy, with immediate postthrombectomy development of ipsilateral anisocoria. The anisocoria progressed into complete oculomotor nerve palsy over 8 h after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical course described in this case is consistent with injury to the third nerve due to mechanical injury or occlusion of perforator supply to the nerve during thrombectomy. Oculomotor nerve palsy is a rare but known complication after ischemia; however, to our knowledge, this is the first case after thrombectomy for a PCA embolus.

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