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Acta Medica Iranica ; 60(6):338-344, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033505

ABSTRACT

Dyspnea and decreased O2 saturation are the most common causes of hospitalization in noncritical COVID-19 patients. Breathing exercises and chest physiotherapy are used for managing the patients. These treatments are, however, not well supported by scientific evidence. In a randomized controlled trial, 80 patients were randomly assigned to planned breathing exercises (n=40) and control groups (n=40). The participants in the intervention group were instructed to blow into a balloon five times a day while lying down. Other therapies were similar in both groups. The severity of dyspnea at rest/after activity and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) with/without O2 therapy were compared between the two groups on the first, second, and third days. The study findings showed no statistically significant difference in SpO2 with/without O2 therapy on the first, second, and third days between the two groups. Although the severity of dyspnea showed no significant difference between the two groups, the mean score of dyspnea at rest (2.72±2.25 vs. 1.6±1.21, P=0.007) and after activity (4.53±2.04 vs. 3.52±1.66, P=0.017) improved in the intervention group on the third day. Balloon-blowing exercise improves dyspnea in noncritical Covid-19 patients, but it does not significantly improve oxygenation.

2.
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine ; 9(1), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1635899

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Many reports have stated that patients admitted for COVID-19 may also suffer from cardiovascular diseases, suggesting cardiovascular involvement in COVID-19. Since there is direct association between electrocardiography (ECG) data and the prognosis of cardiovascular disease, a systematic literature review was performed in the present study to address this association and make a conclusive agreement on the early diagnostic and prognostic values of ECG in patients with COVID-19.

3.
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine ; 9(1):10, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1070320

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Many reports have stated that patients admitted for COVID-19 may also suffer from cardiovascular diseases, suggesting cardiovascular involvement in COVID-19. Since there is direct association between electrocardiography (ECG) data and the prognosis of cardiovascular disease, a systematic literature review was performed in the present study to address this association and make a conclusive agreement on the early diagnostic and prognostic values of ECG in patients with COVID-19. Methods: Electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched for "COVID-19" and "ECG" using all their equivalents and similar terms as search words. Afterwards, the recordswere limited to English articles and irrelevant documents, as well as articles that reported drug-induced cardiac dysfunction or patients with previous history of cardiovascular complications were excluded. Results: Overall, 31 articles with 2379 patients were found and used for qualitative data extraction. Findings showed that there is a significant association between COVID-19 infection and ECG findings. Also, ST-segment changes, T wave inversions, QT prolongation, and atrial fibrillation were found to be early indicators of cardiac involvement of COVID-19, which were associated with worse outcomes. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ECG as a valuable diagnostic and prognostic tool for cardiac evaluation of patients with COVID-19.

4.
Journal of Environmental Treatment Techniques ; 8(3):884-893, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-822629

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a virus that causes acute respiratory syndrome. Although it is less deadly than other members of its family, i.e. SARS and MERS, its extremely rapid transmission rate has become a widespread concern today. Airborne droplets, environmental surfaces, nasal mucosa, urine and fecal samples are among the routes for the transmission of this virus. Both temperature and humidity factors affect the viability of the virus and its mortality rate. Increasing the ambient temperature makes the virus unstable, while lowering the temperature contributes to its stability. Due to the fact that the main route for the transmission of this virus is the particles containing the virus, observing the social distance of at least one meter, using masks as well as air purification systems can reduce the risk of virus transmission to some extent. This contagious virus has made life difficult for everyone in the community, especially pregnant women, children and the elderly. This viral infection can be diagnosed in many ways, including laboratory tests, molecular tests, the chest X-ray and CT scan. It is worth noting that chest CT scan is more sensitive than other methods and is used as the first line of diagnosis. Despite numerous efforts, no definitive cure has yet been found and isolation of those involved is recognized as first-line treatment. The treatments so far can be divided into three categories: general treatments, pharmacological treatments, and diet. General treatments involve isolation, mask use, oxygen therapy, room ventilation and more. Because of the rapid spread and the many challenges that this viral infection has created, scientists have used many of the drugs that were previously used to treat the influenza, malaria, AIDS, etc., some of which have been used to treat the viral infection. It should be noted that some of these drugs were very effective on some people's bodies. Some of these drugs were even used for pregnant mothers. A proper diet and the use of certain vitamins such as iron, zinc, vitamins A, B, C, E can also be effective in preventing and treating this viral infection. Many efforts to develop a vaccine against this virus infection began about two weeks after the outbreak and the attempts to reach this goal continues. © 2020, Dorma Journals. All rights reserved.

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