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1.
Critical Care Medicine ; 51(1 Supplement):37, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2190464

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Burnout results from physical and mental exhaustion and affects the intentionality to leave the profession. Unfortunately, burnout scenarios have been quite common among Critical Care Advance Practice Providers (APPs). The calls to action to sustain the critical care workforce were in full force before COVID-19 attacked the world and rapidly turned into a pandemic. Already overburdened and depleted critical care workforce was further exacerbated by overwhelming work demands. Our research was aimed at understanding the influence of COVID-19 on the critical care APPs. METHOD(S): We utilized a cross-sectional REDCap survey to understand the self-perceived extent to which the burnout among critical APPs had changed. A single link to survey was emailed to 2775 SCCM physician assistant and nursing section members. There were 578 responses (response rate 20.8%). After excluding 60 non-APPs responses, our sample size was 518. Survey questions asked about the symptoms of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, perception of reduced personal accomplishments and intention to leave. RESULT(S): We found an increase in burnout and related dimensions. Emotional exhaustion increased from 28.8%- 69.9%, depersonalization increased from 17.2%-37.6%%, and perception of reduced personal accomplishments increased from 18.1%-38% among our study population. We also asked about the intentions to leave critical care and a total of 513 participants engaged with this question. Twenty-two percent (n=114) of our sample expressed an intention to leave critical care. We also asked about the intention to leave the profession altogether and only 21.8% (n=113) participants responded. A total of 43.3% (n=49) respondents reported the intention to leave the profession altogether within the following 2-5 years. Of those who responded, 22.1% (n=25) intended to leave within 1 year and 25.7% (n=29) intended to leave between 5-10 years while 8.9% (n=10) stated that they intended to stay beyond 10 years. CONCLUSION(S): COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the burnout and its dimensions among critical care APPs. It is crucial to attend to the trends in burnout and intention to leave and mitigation strategies must be employed to sustain the critical care workforce which is key to planning the future of critical care in the US and globally.

2.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):1110, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063405

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Kidney transplantation has become the optimal treatment for end stage renal disease (ESRD), allowing dialysis free survival. Despite widespread availability of transplant programs;rural patients have limited access to transplantation due to several barriers including increased travel time and financial burden. We report outcomes after establishment of a kidney transplant program serving rural West Virginia. Method(s): A retrospective review of the first 15 kidney transplants performed at a newly established Appalachian transplant program was conducted. Primary outcomes measured were graft survival and function. Other outcomes included graft rejection, patient survival and complications. Data related to patient demographics, etiology of ESRD, type of renal replacement therapy, time on transplant waitlist and average travel to transplant center were also collected. Result(s): The first 15 kidneys transplanted had an overall death censored graft survival rate of 100%. Median patient age was 53 (Range 31- 73 years) and a median follow-up of 6 months (Range 1-13 months). The average time on dialysis for this cohort was 4 years (n=13, Range 1-6 years) and average time on waitlist was 4.06 months (Range 0.4-13.2 months). The most common type of dialysis was hemodialysis (77%) followed by peritoneal dialysis (15%). Two patients were predialysis. Diabetes with hypertension (20%), IgA nephropathy (13%) and diabetes without hypertension (13%) were the most common causes of ESRD. Median graft creatinine was 1.51 mg/dL (Range 1.26 - 1.83 mg/dL) with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 51.38 (Range 41.86-70) at one year. One patient developed acute antibody mediated rejection and one developed borderline T cell mediated rejection (13.3%), which were successfully treated with steroids, plasmapheresis and immune globulin therapy. Two patients died (13.3 %);one from acute respiratory failure following coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and one from cardiac arrest secondary to myocarditis (possible COVID-19). Patients experienced COVID-19 infection at a rate of 13.3 %. The average distance patients had to travel was 94 miles (Range 12 - 164 miles) with a travel time of 1 hour and 52 minutes on average (Range 20 minutes - 2.5 hours) to reach the transplant center. Conclusion(s): We report comparable outcomes from our new rural transplant program despite several barriers to delivery of quality care to our population.

3.
BMJ Mil Health ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1973862

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic placed significant global pressure on public health, with the demand for specialist clinical input, equipment and therapeutics often outweighing supply in many well-established healthcare systems. The UK was no exception to this burden, resulting in unprecedented demands being placed on its NHS. Throughout the pandemic, the UK Defence Medical Services (DMS) aided the civilian healthcare sector, while concurrently adapting as an organisation to meet its enduring commitment in promoting the operational output of the wider UK Armed Forces. This paper serves to provide an overview of some of these key activities while offering proposed lessons which can be learnt, in order to promote the DMS' output in times of future crises. Of note, the DMS aided to mitigate surge demands placed on the NHS' supply chain, assisting in promoting its resilience to provide key materials to civilian clinical personnel. Adaptation of military policy generation mechanisms, together with adoption of novel technological approaches to promote remote working, empowered efficient DMS operational output throughout the pandemic. Direct provision of personnel to assist in the NHS' clinical output served to foster mutually beneficial interorganisational relationships, while providing objective benefit for the UK public.This paper was selected as the BMJ Military Health Royal Society of Medicine Colt Foundation National Essay Prize Winner 2021.

4.
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation ; 40(4):S211-S211, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1187412
5.
Geophysical Research Letters ; 47(22):6, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-989691

ABSTRACT

Governments restricted mobility and effectively shuttered much of the global economy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Six San Francisco Bay Area counties were the first region in the United States to issue a "shelter-in-place" order asking non-essential workers to stay home. Here we use CO2 observations from 35 Berkeley Environment, Air-quality and CO2 Network (BEACO(2)N) nodes and an atmospheric transport model to quantify changes in urban CO2 emissions due to the order. We infer hourly emissions at 900-m spatial resolution for 6 weeks before and 6 weeks during the order. We observe a 30% decrease in anthropogenic CO2 emissions during the order and show that this decrease is primarily due to changes in traffic (-48%) with pronounced changes to daily and weekly cycles;non-traffic emissions show small changes (-8%). These findings provide a glimpse into a future with reduced CO2 emissions through electrification of vehicles.

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